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JANUARY 1950 • $8.00 a Year 




Railroads need 
better radio — p. 30 

Backstage at Lennen & Mitchell — p. 21 



A N os aaoA *3N 

7<:w, ° 08N 

S3O03H S WW 

6LVZI 09-01 




s, . 



TV Critics 
Club 

page 32 



commercials 

page 26 



Behind the 
scenes 

page \ 



.J* 



\ 







^JW-* "*"** 







How to up 
deposits 

page 28 



TV Results 

page 38 



Mr. Sponsor: 
Van Bomel 

page 16 



Mr. Sponsor 
Asks 

page 36 



? 




page 


18 


New & 
Renew 

page 


1 


Compjra 
graph 

page 


1 


page ij 


Applause 

pagi 






HOW TO PUT 
YOUR BEST FOOT 
FORWARD 
IN RICHMOND 



( 



If you're looking for national sales you can't 

overlook Virginia's first market. 

Fast expanding Richmond is well worth knowing. 

It's a city of traditions, a city of pride. It's 

a city with a heart. 

Throughout the metropolitan Richmond market you'll 

discover that The First Stations of Virginia command 

a respect and warmth that add up to advertising results. 

There are good and understandable reasons for this. 

Any Blair man will be glad to explain them. 



Havens & Martin Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institutions in Virginia. 



WMBGam 

TV FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 



Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
Represented nationally by 
John Blair & Company. 




TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



2 January 1950 



Spot volume soon 
may pass network 



Rail vs. air 

advertising battle 

looms 



At present expansion rate national spot volume may pass national net- 
work in two or three years. In 1948 spot moved up to $14,800,000, 
from $91,000,000 in 1947. After summer slump, it gained again last 
fall and is expected to show $110,000,000 for year 1949. Four coast- 
to-coast networks meanwhile billed-after discounts-$133,000, 000 in 1947 
and 1948, and dipped in 1949 about 4% to about $128,000,000. Local 
broadcasting followed retail sales trend down 5-7 per cent. 

-SR- 

1950 may be big year for rail air advertising as a result of airlines 
aggressive drive for passenger business. Railroads have been feeble 
air advertisers to date; airlines somewhat stronger. Television will 
be used by many in both categories because of travel picture possi- 
bilities (see page 30). 

-SR- 

With stations reps at year's end busier than ever getting contracts. 
Some estimates place national spot in first half of 1950 at 15-20 
per cent above first half of 1949. Foods, soaps, drug products (in- 
cluding antihistamine cold tablets) and watches lead the parade. 
Motor makers will use spots not only to announce new models but for 
sustained campaigns. One watch company, Longines-Wittnauer, is re- 
ported dropping two network shows to return to spot. 

-SR- 

More Chiquita Chiquita Banana is gaining new applause for United Fruit as it cau- 
Banana public tions New Yorkers on the necessity for conserving water. Chiquita 
service frequently pitches in on public service jobs these days. 



Estimates see 
spot up 15-20% 



Mitchell urges 
harder selling 



Networks start 
Happy New Year 



-SR- 

Aggressive, intelligent selling turned tide of receding business 
in broadcasting in 1949, said Maurice Mitchell, director of BAB, in a 
year-end report. Many broadcasters discovered, he said, that "poten- 
tial advertisers in every market just weren't being asked to buy 
broadcast advertising. If broadcasters continue to use every avail- 
able selling tool, on every available advertiser, 1950 will see new 
record established." 

-SR- 

Final figures are expected to show NBC ahead of CBS in 1949 time 
billings. But CBS announces new business starting in January will 
total $3,800,000 on annual basis. 



SPONSOR, Volume 4. No. 1. 2 January. 1950. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publication! Inc.. 3110 Elm Ave. Baltimore 11. Ml Executive. Editorial. (Mr. illation 
Office 510 Madison Ave. N Y $8 a year In V S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1919 at Baltimore. Md iiostoffire under Act 3 March ls79 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR R 



Mutual sells 
$3,000,000 time 



Coincident with denial of report Mutual network would be sold to 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, Frank White, MBS prexy, announced net 
has sold $3,000,000 time on annual basis. In first nine months of 
1949 MBS revenue was down 11 per cent from paralled period of '48— 
but Mutual is optimistic about new year. 



-SR- 

Woods stresses Mark Woods, president of ABC, emphhasized video in annual statement 
TV expansion but added that, ABC has been "equally vigorous in the field of radio." 
Net announced its daytime mystery (SR, 19 December) will be "Hannibal 
Cobb," half-hour, five-a-week afternoon show. . . ABC revenue was down 
in 1949, and reports still persist net may be sold. 

-SR- 



Stanton boasts 
high ratings 



Frank Stanton of CBS found plenty to crow about at year's end in cur- 
rent Nielsen and Hooperatings , where CBS respectively had 16 of the 
top 20 and nine of the top 15 nighttime programs. "Time sales for 
both radio and TV in 1949", he pointed out, were highest in company's 
history. 

-SR- 



FCC reports 
more stations 



FCC reports these stations on air at year's end: AM, 2072; FM, 740; 
TV, 94. Deletions include 60 AM, 204 FM, and 12 TV stations. Con- 
struction permits are pending for 320 AM, 48 FM and 354 TV stations. 



-SR- 



Union network 
signs up K-F 



Kaiser-Frazer has become first "union network" sponsor, effective 2 
January, with news commentaries on six-stations: WFDR, New York; KSMV, 
Los Angeles (both owned by Ladies' Garment union) ; WDET, Detroit, and 
WCU0, Cleveland, owned by United Auto Workers; WCMF, Washington, co- 
operatively owned, and WFLN, Philadelphia. Some 75 stations are now 
either owned by unions or run by groups friendly to them. 



-SR- 



ILCWU matches 
Pope bid for WINS 



International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union has matched Generoso 
Pope's $512,000 bid for purchase from Crosley Broadcasting of 50,000- 
watt WINS, New York. ILGWU already owns FM station WFDR there, and 
Pope, Italian Language newspaper publisher, owns WHOM. 



-SR- 



Ncws broadcasts 
get more interest 



WOR has found in study of average ratings of major news programs 
covering last eight years in New York that "more people spend more 
time listening" to such programs now than during early part of World 
War II, and "average rating for all 15-minute newscasts currently tops 
average for comparable months in all war years." 

Please turn to page 34 



SPONSOR 




LAT£ AGAIN ? 

CALL, WIRE, WRITE FOR INFO ON RADIO'S 
ONLY NEW AND PROVEN TRANSCRIBED SERIAL - 

"SECOND SPRING" 

Also Great Musicals 

PLANTATION HOUSE PARTY HOSPITALITY TIME EDDY ARNOLD SHOW 




RADIO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

MONOGRAM BUILDING NASHVILLE 3, TENNESSEE 

SALES AGENCY: MONOGRAM RADIO PROGRAMS, INC. 



CHICAGO 
AN 3-7169 



NASHVILLE 

4-1751 



2 JANUARY 1950 




Vol. 4 no. 1 



2 January 1950 



FEATURES 



Sponsor Reports 

40 West 52 

On the Hill 

New and Renew 

Mr. Sponsor: L. A. Van Bomel 

P.S. 

Mr. Sponsor Asks 

TV Results 

Comparagraphs 

Sponsor Speaks 

Applause 



1 
6 
8 
13 
16 
18 
36 
38 
47 
62 
62 



President & Publisher: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Ellen L. Davis 

Senior Editors: Frank M. Bannister, Irving Marder, 
Hope Beauchamp, Miles David 

Assistant Editors: Joe Gould, Fred Birnbaum 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice President in charge advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Director: Lester J. Blumenthal 

Advertising Department: Jerry Glynn, Jr. (Chicago 
Manager), Edwin D. Cooper (West Coast Man- 
ager), M. H. LeBlang, Beatrice Turner 

Business Manager: Bernard Piatt 

Circulation Department: Emily Cutillo, Victoria 
Woods 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Publlihed biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. Ki • 
ocutlio, Bdllorlll, •ml Advcrtlilng Odlro: 40 Weil 52 Street. 
New York la. N v. Telephone: I'lia 3-6216. Chicago OIBce 
360 N MMilgan Avenue Telephone: Financial 1566. Print- 
ing Offlre: 311(1 Klin Arc. Baltimore 11, Md Huhirrlpllona: 
I'nlled Hlalci JK ■ year Canaila and foreign $9. Single roplcn 
sOc Printed In r s ,\ Addrc all correepondi i 10 

Madiaon Arcnue N'ch York 20, N Y Copyrigl 
SP0N80R PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Backstage at 
Lennen & Mitchell 



Radio saves the 
day 



Hottest thing in 
radio 



Louisville's 
Mr. Sponsor 



Railroads need 
better radio 



Before you junk 
your commercial 



Jingles graduate 
to TV 



The waiting 
farm market 



After midnight 
programing 



Critique 
on Co-op 



Lightning that 
Strikes 




ARTICLES 



How a top-flight agency approaches prob- 
lems of client, solves them by integrated 
effort 



The big flood looked likely to cancel Joske's 
sale of the year, till radio came to the rescue 



If there are still a few sponsors who have 
no singing commercials on the air, chances 
are they'll follow the trend in the near 
future 



How a radio-wise Louisville Savings & Loan 
association boosted deposits from $25,000 
to $31,000,000 



Sponsor survey reveals haphazard thinking 
on broadcast advertising is no boon to na- 
tion's roads 



Analysis of reactions of 1,000 members of 
TV Critics Club show that the commercials 
they like best don't necessarily sell them 
on the product 



IN FUTURE ISSUES 



Production problems are a major headache, 
but sponsor-agency execs can take a bow 
on the quality of the work produced to date 



Farm income and demand for electrical 
appliances hit an all-time high, but radio is 
generally missing the boat 



What goes on the air after 12 o'clock, who 
sponsors the programs, and who listens 



Co-op radio is growing 
wrong way 



but often in the 



All-radio presentation film will be fully de 
scribed in SPONSOR'S Souvenir Edition 



21 



25 



26 



28 



30 



32 



1 



16 Januar 



16 Januar 



16 Januar 



16 Januar 



30 Januar 






$&&& 



makes mornings merrier! 



WGY area listeners get a merry 
start for the day, every morning, 
Monday through Friday between 
7:15 and 8:45. That's when master 
showman, EARLE PUDNEY, takes 
over for an hour and a half, with 
a combination of piano, vocals, 
and favorite recorded selections. 
Advertisers get a break too. Com- 
mercials are woven neatly into the 
fabric of the show with carefully 
planned intros and segues. The 
outcome — better listening — more 
listeners — tangible sales results. 



CUNTON 

43 



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A/burgh^r.. ... •wgterbury „,„& 

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NEWARK*^. 

Amboy 
d Bonk 
Long Branch 

SlAsb.ry Pork 

StNeotune 



SCAlf or MUfS 

I = 



Our name is Wideman. We are one of 65,310 
radio families that live in Albany County. Last 
year the four of us spent 3300 dollars for 
necessities. With two children, our household is 
a busy place in the morning — but not too busy 
to include Earle Pudney of WGY at the break- 
fast table. His wonderful piano playing, singing 
and general comment help make our mornings 
merrier. I hear him at home and during the 
16-mile drive to my place of business. Plum 
puddings to Pudney! 



BMB— STUDY NO. 1—1946 



Represented Nationally by NBC Spot Sales 



l A^UC 




CENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 



KEY TO SYMBOLS 



* Over 250,000 



100,000—250,000 • 50,000—100,000 ® 25,000 — 50,000 



10,000-25,000 O Under 10,000 



ITS EASY, 



IF YOU 
KNOW HOW! 




A, 



L t KWKH we don't know how to do handstands, or 
"fingerstands" either, but we do know how to get and 
hold the greatest radio audience in our booming four- 
state area. 

Shreveport Hoopers prove that KWKH gets the 
greatest Share of Audience in our great metro- 
politan market. Oct. -Nov., '49 figures, for in- 
stance, showed a 41.5% greater Share of Audi- 
ence than Station B for Total Rated Periods. 

Mail-pull figures, paid attendance at "live" 
shows and BMB percentages prove that KWKH 
is tops with the rural audience, too. 

By any measurement, KWKH is the best buy in this rich 
Southern market. May we send you all the proof? 



KWKH 



50,000 Watts 



CBS 



Texas 
Arkansas 

Mm' ■ •____• 
ISSISSIppI 



40 West 52nd 



MAIL ORDER SELLINC 

^ our story "Is Mail Order Good for 
Radio" seems overly charitable to the 
station practice of selling time on a 
per inquiry basis. From personal ob- 
servation I submit that current abuses 
are harming station reputations and 
disturbing thoughtful advertisers who 
pay card rates. 

Only yesterday my wife mentioned 
the keen dissatisfaction of a friend 
who bought a tablecloth through one 
of these P.I. ads. No outright false- 
hoods may have been told, but the 
cloth received was not hemmed, it had 
several other demerits which I have 
forgotten, and the purchaser said she 
would never again trust anv advertis- 
ing she heard on that station. 

This was not a struggling station; it 
was upper crust. Clearly its censor- 
ship of copy is not what it is cracked 
up to be. 

Oliver B. Capelle 

Sales Promotion Manager 

Miles Labora'ories 

Elkhart, Indiana 



In view of the fact that many radio 
stations owe a substantial share of 
their billing to mail order accounts, 
and at the same time provide a genu- 
ine service to their listeners, I think 
your recent article on the subject was 
realistic, informative, helpful and con- 
structive, showing as it did, both pros 
and cons of the situation. 

Hubert K. Simon, President 
11. K. Simon Advertising 
New York City 



We've read with interest the article 
in the December 5th issue concerning 
the stations which accept percentage- 
of-inquiries deals. Would you be good 
enough to let us have a list of stations 
in this mail order network? 
Jack L. Levin 
Louis E. Schecter Advertising 
Baltimore. Maryland 

• l.isl <>T MO> station., is not n\ nil .|M< I.ul fur- 
ther inforni.it ton ma, hi- obtained by »nhii:' to 

Mail Order Network, llln Broadway, N.%. York. 



The Branham Company, Representatives 
Henry Clay, General Manager 



READING VS. LISTENING 

Kecenth. \ou sent us a reprint from 
si'c»\M>l< Magazine containing "Read- 
ing vs. Listening" 1>\ Dr. Lazarsfeld. 

It made such a favorable impression 
on our sales statT that the men are 



SPONSOR 



TON-SALEM 




How To Lose An Account 

A Winston - Salem dry 
cleaner, using WAIRadio ex- 
clusively, cancelled his news 
strip. Reason: He outgrew 
his plant and could not 
handle the increased busi- 
ness WAIRadio brought. We 
lost this account for six 
months. Now he's back on 
the air, the new plant in 
operation and business is 
booming. 



NORTH CAROLINA 
National Rep: Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



in Sound 
Reproduction 




UNO-WORTH 



IMG-WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS. I in 

113 WEST 57th STREET, 
NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

Network Calibre Programs 
at Cocal Station Cost 



2 JANUARY 1950 



clamoring for additional copies which 
they can put in their sales kit. If it 
would not be imposing on you too 
greatly, please send us ten additional 
reprints, if you still have them avail- 
able. I assure you they will he great- 
ly appreciated by all of us at WQAM. 
Harky Camp 
Asst. General Manager 
WQAM, Miami, Florida 



MAXON INQUIRIES 

\\r have been unable to scare up a 
November issue of SPONSOR — appar- 
ently your story on Gillette is the 
cause for disappearances! If you have 
a spare copy, we would certainly ap- 
preciate having it. 

Jean llERLim 

Merchandising Dept. 

Maxon Inc. 

Detroit, Mich. 



In In your article "The Forgotten 
15 Million" in the October 24th issue 
you say "Negro disc jockeys . . . have 
now multiplied to more than 100.' 
Have you even a partial list of the sta- 
tions with programs slanted to the Ne- 
gro market? I am particularly inter- 
ested in the stations of Illinois, Miss- 
ouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, 
Oklahoma. Louisiana, and Mississippi. 
Aside from WDIA in Memphis most 
of those we heard about are north of 
the Mason-Dixon line. 

Preston H. Pumphrey 

Maxon, Inc. 

New York City 

• SPONSOR has ... . - ...... I to send a lint of Negro 

disk jockeys to Mr. Pumphrey. 



MORE RE BMB 

I'd like to congratulate you on the 
excellent presentation of the story on 
BMB in your November 7 issue. I 
think that you have comprehensively 
and forcefully told a very important 
story. 

Roger W. Clipp 
General Manager 
WFIL, Philadelphia 



FARM FACTS 

Congratulations on 
Facts Handbook."" It 
treatment of COMMERCIAL 
casting in the farm field that 
ever seen. 

i Please turn to page (ill 



your "Farm 

is the finest 
broad- 
[ have 



WTAL 




TALLAHASSEE 

5000 Watts — Day and Night 
the ecu tor of 

Capitaland 



Serving 

and 
Selling 

12 

I iniii i|iii Counties 

and 

11 

Florida Counties 

Ask your John Blair 
man to tell you the full 
story on Capitaland and 
North Florida's most 
powerful radio voice — 
WTAL! 

WTAL 

TALLAHASSEE 

L. Herschel Graves, Gen'l Mgr. 
John H. Phipps, Owner 

FLORIDA GROUP 

Columbia 

Broadcasting 

System 




fj, 







OK THE HILL 



Taxes and investigations 
slow growth of business 

While Senator O'Mahoney's committee is trying to find 
out what can be done to get risk capital flowing again in- 
to the bloodstream of business, other governmental factors 
at the start of 1950 tend to impede economic progress. 
High "luxury" taxes, for example, are still in effect. Sec- 
retary of Commerce Sawyer has proposed a new inter- 
agency committee to study "monopoly," and the Justice 
Department is piling up testimony in its anti-trust action 
against the A&P stores. Both the FTC and Food and Drug 
Administration have started inquiries into advertising 
claims for the new anti-histamine cold "cures.'" 

But, somehow, business 
still forges ahead 

Despite restraints and uncertainty, the business indexes 
move into a new half-century on a sharp upward trend. 
Business Week's index not only shows recovery of all the 
ground lost since the steel strike started in October but 
currently is at about the level of last March. 

South and West lead 
in economic progress 

In the I'Mll-W period, business in the Southeast. Southwest 
and Far West moved ahead much faster than the national 
average the Commerce Department reports. The number 
of business concerns in the country increased 913.000 
over the five-year period, totalling 3,935,000 at end of 
1949. Forty-eight per cent of this increase was made by 
these three areas. Florida, Arizona and California led 
with respective gains of 71, 67 and 59 per cent. 

Color and UHF decisions 
will spark TV expansion 

Sometime next spring the FCC probabl) will adopt policies 
ending the freeze on new VHF T\ stations and releasing 
I I IF and color. I!\I \ has been getting commissioners' re- 
actions to a proposed new National Television System 
Committee to formulate eoloi standards. FCC will resume 

hearings on all three questions 20 February. Meanwhile. 
even without decisions on them, industry generally agrees 
thai 1,500,000 to 5,000,000 TV sets will be sold in 1950. 

Iln- would double the number now in use. 



Heinz, CF credit sales 
rise to advertising 

The Justice Department's suit against A&P continues to 
bring forth some interesting figures. Howard Heinz, presi- 
dent of H. J. Heinz Company, said that of his 1949 volume 
of $126,146,500. advertising represented 5.2 per cent. 
Charles G. Mortimer of General Foods credited advertising 
with a major part in lifting GF sales in 10 years from 
$135,000,000 to $500,000,000 annually. 

Some increase seen 
in 1950 ad budgets 

Advertising budgets in 1950 will "at least equal 1949's 
outlay." the W all Street Journal has concluded, and "final 
decisions may boost the total above 1949." Increases are 
expected, among others, by General Motors. Ford. Kaiser- 
Frazer, National Airlines, International Silver, and du 
Pont. Association of American Railroads and New York 
Central, however, are among advertisers currently reducing 
budgets. VanHeusen shirts will spend a record $1,000,000. 

Paul Willis predicts 
more food advertising 

Total food store sales in 1949 were about $30.2 billion, as 
compared with $30.5 billion in 1948 — the decline being 
due to "lower prices rather than to decreased tonnage 
sales." said Paul S. Willis, president of Grocery Manufac- 
turers of America. He lound a "hopeful outlook" for 
1950: Aggressive manufacturers will increase their ad- 
vertising as the sale becomes harder to make.'" 

Advertising Council starts 
"half-century" campaign 

The Advertising Council reviews the economic progress 
of the last half-century and suggests how the trend can be 
continued, in a campaign guide for 1950. Titled The Bet- 
ter We Produce the Better We Live it offers advertising 
ideas and general plans for campaigns o nthis theme. 
Broadcast messages on this theme thus far total more than 
two Billion listener impressions. 

Sawyer proposes single 
agency on transportation 

The Government is "fostering and promoting competition" 
in transportation on one hand and restricting it on the 
other. Commerce Secretary Sawyer pointed out in a 100- 
page report to President Truman. The railroads have long 
complained of the "unfairness" of government subsidies 
to airline-, water carriers and trucks and buses, through 
outlays for road-building. Mr. Sawyer asked formation of 
a sigle government agenc) to handle subsidies and other 
promotional activities for all forms of transportation. 

D. C. Commission puts 
okay on transit radio 

District of Columbia Public I tilities Commission has dis- 
missed ilv investigation of transit radio, and has ruled that 
musc-as-you-ride "is not inconsistent with public con- 
venience, comforl and safety." Washington Transit Radio. 
Inc.. has equipped 212 buses and trolley cars with transit 
radio, and plans extending it to 1,500 more. 



8 



SPONSOR 



Over 500 have already subscribed lo the 

ALL-RADIO PRESENTATION 



HOW ABOUT YOU? 



The eagerly-awaited ALL-RADIO PRESENTATION film 
is almost ready for release— ready to sock borne its mes- 
sage throughout tin- length and breadth of America, sell- 
ing Radio to all types of advertisers everywhere. The offi- 
cial preview will be February 1. with nationwide release 
on February I"). 

So if yon haven't subscribed— as 500 already have— note 
thai this is the LAST CALL! Only subscribing broadcasters 
will be able to present this convincing, fact-filled motion 
picture, different from anything ever prepared before— a 
film that actually shows Radio at work selling goods! 

The dosing date for all subscriptions is February 15. Cost 
is low in ratio to your station's billings, and you'll have 
available three different editions on 16 mm. sound film 
(or 35 mm. if desired): 

■Jf a 45-minute edition that puts the full story of Radio 
before any audience of businessmen, up to the topmost 
management, right in your own community. 

■X- a 20-minute version for showings at sales meetings, and 
business organization luncheons such as Chamber of 
Commerce. Kiwanis. Rotary, etc. 

# a 20-minute educational edition for showings at schools, 
P.-T.A. meetings, women's clubs, etc. 

Radio has kept silent about itself long enough. Join the 
chorus. Speak up and help ALL 1\M)I() sing \LL the 
praises of Americas greatest advertising medium. Send in 
the coupon right away for complete details on how ^ 01 
can join the rest of the industry in benefiting from the 
All-Radio Presentation. 



ALL-RADIO 

PRESENTATION 

COMMITTEE 



THE COMMITTEE- Gordon Gray, WIP, Chairman - Maurice B. 
Mitchell, ItAlt — Herbert 1.. Krueger, WTAG, Treasurer — Eugene S. 
Thomas, WOIC— Leonard Vsch, WBCA III.- Itterberry, K< k\ 
Lewis Avery, Avery-Knodel -Will Baltin, TBA Bond Geddes, RM \ 
— IvorKenway, \H<: Harrj Maizlish, KFWB— W.B.McGill.West. 
inghouse Stations -Frank Pellegrin, Transit liailm. Inc. -Victor M. 
Ratner, It. II. Mac] — Uanque E.Ringgold, Edward I *<• i r > \ Co. — 
Erring Rosenhaus, WAAT — F. I.. Spencer, Jr., Hollingbery Co. — 
George- \\ all ace, NBC— Ralph \\ eil, \\ U\ . 



THE ALL-RADIO PRESENTATION 

tells Radio s unique story to nil adver- 
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shows how Radio helps build and main- 
tain good business in the smallest as well 
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demonstrates what a money-saving buy 
Radio is. 

stresses the enormous size of the Radio 
audience and the intensify of its listen- 
ing attention. 

sells Radio as the most practical way of 
reaching more customers til less cost. 



The ALL-Radio 

Presentation Committee 

Yessir, I do want to be part of the ALL-Radio Presentation. Please 
send me further details on how I can subscribe at once. 



Name 



Station 



Address 



City_ 



-State- 



Send your coupon to: 

Broadcast Advertising Bureau 

270 Park Avenue, New York 17. N. Y. 



Travelings 





I 




Entertainment has always drawn a crowd. 
The crowd has always sought it. or waited for 
it to come to them. Wherever there was 
a crowd, there were customers. And wherever 
there were customers, there were people with 
tilings to sell. (A crowd that was /it a good 
mood always bought more). 

Todav the entertainer still gets the crowd. 

only he gets it faster and bigger. 

Through radio he reaches crowds of ten and 

twentv millions in a split second. 

And along with him goes the advertiser. 

In radio the largest crowds gather at that 
point on the dial where the entertainment is 
the best. That point today is CBS. 

For the Columbia Broadcasting System 
continues to be the most creative network in 
providing the kind of entertainment which 
captures the largest audiences. 

Only on CBS will you find most of the 
sponsored programs with the largest audiences 
in radio (11 out of the "top 15"). 

And only on CBS can advertisers find most 
of the available programs with the largest 
audiences (7 out of the "top 10"). 

This is what makes CBS the most effective 
traveling salesman in radio . . . reaching more 
people with better entertainment ... making 
the strongest impressions in all advertising. 



' 






r 



V\\ 





— where 99,000.000 people gather every week 




Reminder, for a SHAMPOO manufacturer: 



\ 



SPOT _ 

RADIO works blondes, brunettes, and red-heads 

^^^ into a buying lather! 




\P 



You've got to sell the girls if you want 
to build big shampoo volume. You've got to keep 
selling them, too . . . again and again and again! 
Spot Radio lets you do just that, economically 
and profitably. For, Spot Radio will deliver and 
sell an audience of women where and when you 
want it . . . once a week or twenty times a day, 
in one market or all markets! 

Spot Radio gives you your choice of 
audience, markets, stations, times, programs, 
seasons. This complete flexibility, backed by 
radio's impact, makes any budget — large or 
small — do its full selling job! Ask your 
John Blair man about it. 
He knows Spot Radio ! 



ASK 
YOUR 
JOHN 



BLAIR 



MAN! 

JOHN 
IS I BLAIR 

REPRESENTING LEADING RADIO STATIONS 

I COMPANY 

OFFICES IN CHICAGO • NEW YORK • DETROIT ST. LOUIS • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 

50 SPONSOR 



2 JANUARY 1950 




0m New National Spot Business 



and rvneu 



THE REPORTS LISTED BELOW APPEAR IN ALTERNATE ISSUES 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MKTS CAMPAIGN, start, duration 




American Express-Cath- Trai el 

olic Travel League 
for 1950 M.. I. Year 
Jubilee 



Beechnut Cum 



Bicycle Institute of 
America 



Bri»tol Myers 

Delaney 

D. Mm & Dougherty 
Eagle Lion Picture* 



Guv 



Km v eld 



Frozen food 

Heet Division 
Movies 



General Food* Swan»down Cakt 

Mix 

Procter & Gamble I 1 ,. M 

Ren ault Automobiles 

Union Oil Co Oil 

* Station list set at moment 



Ka> McCurlh* ( V V) 



hen von & Kekhardl 
(N. IT.) 



'. Ill j. I.. I II V. .,1,1 

<N. V.) 



Renvon & Krkharcil 
<N. Y.) 

Foote, Cone & Re Id in? 
(N. Y.) 

II. .ii if & Ryan 



Young A Ki.l... 
(N. Y.) 



Benton A llo%* I, - 
(IN. Y.) 



Smith, Smallev »X I est- 
er, Ine (N. Y.) 



New ^>rk City onlj 
Possibility of expending 
into 15-20 mkts at a 

later date 

65-70 stns; 60 mkts (all 

ea-I of Mississippi exet -pi 

L. A. & S. F.) 

."> t -,1ns* ; 26 cities 



Over 100 stns* 

Northeast U. S. 



N.irth & South 
Carolina 



Vanker Network i Boston 

area): WLW (Cincinnati 

area) 

California 



Major mkta 

Indef 

6 stns* 



Radio spots; Oct. 10 



Hi. ,k around lir,» of >ear 



Breaks : abl V.* 2 1 < 4gencj doesn't 
plan to run any announcements 
m . ,-k before Xmas ) 

Three-week campaign starting Dec L2 



< i ii»-- m i ii ut.- spots campaign rnd 
early in January. 

Radio spot* 

Spotn; Feb 18 
Spots; Feb 15 



Spot*; early In Jan for abt 241 wkl 



Spots; probablv early In Jan for 
26 wks 

Spots ; probably late Jan or earl> 
February 

Daily 15-min newscasts; 52 wks 



Station Representation Changes 



STATION 



AFFILIATION 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Kill Houston, Texas 
Radio Programas Continental 
Radio Sarrebruck, Saarbrucken. 
WAPA, San Juan, Puerto Rico 
WNEB, Worcester, Mast. 



Independent 
Republic of Panama 
Independent 
Independent 
Independent 



Adam J. Young Jr Inr, \. *. . 
Melchor (Guzman Co Inc, N. Y. 
Pan American Broadcasting Co, N. 
Clark -Wandleas-M an n Inc, N. Y. 
The Boiling Co Inc, N. Y. 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Frederick Anderson 
Hal Mare Arden 
George Balterman 
Harry I Barnett 
M. Oakley Bidwell 
William H. Botsford 
Frank R. Brodsky 

Austin Byrne 



Compton, N. Y., vp 

WMGM, N. Y\, dir 

Schenley Distributor* Inc, N. Y., adv mgr 



Benton & Bowles, N. Y., acct exec 

Sills Inc, Chi., vp 

Lever Bros. (Pepsodent Division), Chi., dir of ad 

Byrne, Harrington A Roberts, N. Y., pres (age 
dissolved ) 



McCann-Erick-on. V Y., dir radio and tv 

Robert A. Boric* Organization, N. Y., radio and tv dir 

Storm & Klein Inr, N. Y., exec 

Doremni A- Co Inc, Boston, acct exec 

"".line, vp 

Den in a n & Bctteridgr Inc. De4roit, pub rel dir and acct rire 

Open own agency in Chi. (Resignation from Lexer Bros, eff 

Dec 31) 
Owen & Chappell, IS*. Y., exec 



• in next issue: Mew National Spot Business; Mew and Renewed on Television: 
Station Representation Changes; Advertising Agencg Personnel Changes 



88: 
88 









:■"■ 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes (Continued) 



NAME 



llarrv W . Calvert 
llarrv Campbell 
John Churchill 
Hal Davis 
John <!•■ Bevco 
Ralph E. de ( astro 
Edward F. Evans 
Kendal] Foster 

II. i> i.l S. t.arla.ul 
Jacob II. Ccise 
Lloyd Gibbons 
W alter II II...,-. 
Harold Hartogensis 

tlberta Hays 
Ralph II. Herbert 
Marshall Hurl 
Ernest I). K..Mi„^ 
Doroth; I). M.I ami 

Mai. ...... 

Jerald II. Mel..... 
Jack Melvin 
Donald C. Miller 
Frederick V. Mitchell 

II Mover 

Marlin J. Murphv 
Martin Oechsner 
Bill Prescotl 

Patricia M. Randolph 
Florence Richards 
Paul Roberts 
Fred Schactcr 
Margol Sherman 
Dav id Sil v erman 
Qnentin I. Smith 
llgol E. Swans,,., 
Jan I angdclius 

llarrv Torp 
Nathan Albert Tufts 
Benjamin It. Vinevar 
(..-..rue A. \„l, 

II. Lawrence W hittemo 
Martin Willsted 
Robert II. Wolfe 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



/.iiiuiier-keller. Detroit 
C. M. Itasford Co., V ■> . 

Broadcast Measurement Bureau, V i 

Kenyon .V Eckhardt, V V. publ .lir 

BBD&O, V V. 

Kiithr.uitr & Ryan, N. Y. 

American Broadcasting Co, N. Y., res 

w llliam Estj ( .. I.... N. ■» . 



Young vx Rubicam, V ^ .. treasurer 



assl 



Equit) Cor| 
Olian, St. I 
McCann.Erickson, N. t .. 



op 



tp 



arch .lir 



id 



Bauerlein, New Orleans, vp 

I M Mathes Inc., V \.. a lal - .lir 

McCann-Erickson, N. Y., exec P r...l in ra.li..-i 

Ncwcll-i ....... II ( ... V ^ .. partner 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, V i. 

Hunt Foods, I . A., i ... I . I r.l dir 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, Detroit office mgr 

N.-e, I). am. Louis ,x Brorb} Inc. Chi., acct ex. 

John Blair, H'« I 

Ruthrauft" & Ryan, V V 

Collier's, N. Y., editorial and a.l> prom .lir 

Bishop & \ ■ Inr. L. A., ae.t exec & r. 

tv rep 



,„l, 



McCann-Erickson, N. ^ .. acct ex 

NBC, N v 

Hirshon-Garfield Inc. N, Y., accl 

McCann-Erickson, N. ^ .. cop> K , 

Evron Co, Chicago, head of lirni 

Mhert Frank-Guenthcr Law Inc. N. i .. ... . 

Los Ingelcs Independent. ;„l> supervisor 
Brooke, Smith. French & I l..rr ...... V 

supervisor 
k.i .von ,x Eekhar.lt. V * . 

W. Earl Bothwell Inc, H'wood, vp 

Kennedy ci I ... Chi. 
Gardner, St. I... acct exec 



1 



ice Advertising, \. Y., 
Ken,.,.. & Fckhardl, H - 



ffic 



Same, exec vp 

i.e.r. DuBoia Inc, N. i .. in charge of marketing ; 

It.-.. ton ,x Bowles, N, I., exec 
Same, .p 

Ward Wheel.,, 'k I ... \. \ .. media dir 
C. J. LaRoche & I ... N If., vp 

J. D. Tardier & Co, N. Y,, research dir 

William Esty Co Inc, N. V. vp in charge <»f tv 

than. hers & Wiswell, Boston, head of cop] dipt 

Same, vp in charge of finai.ee 

J. Waller Thompson, N. Y., aeet ex.-, 

American Association of Advertising Agencies, N. 

McMahan-Horwitz Co, St. I... . i> 

Same. \p 

lt..s- Jurnej .x Vssociates, Salt lake City, acct exc< 

Walter Weir Inc, N. V. exer 

Owen & Chappell Inc, N. V.. associate cop) dir 

Same, vp 

Cecil & Presbrey Inc, V V. exec officer (effective 

Monroe F. Drcher Inc. \. \ .. exec 

co-head of Mel\ in-Silv.-rj.ian Inc. H'w I 

Same \ p 

Same, dir of reseach 

Raymond Keane, H*wood, dir of radio and tv 
^ oung & Rubicam, N. V.. ,r time buyer 

K ul In .11. li o* Ryan. !\. V.. acct ex.-. 

Hall vx Davidson, Denver, acct exec and radio an. 

Adrian Bauer Inc. Phila., dir of radio and i. 

Same, vp 

Benton tt Bowles, V ^ .. radio .lir of radio depl 

Partner in new W Misled & Schactcr Agency, V 

Same, vp 

Melvin-Silv erman Inc., H'wood, co-head 

Same. \ p 

The Fadell Co. M'npls., act exec 

Fulton, Morrisey Co, Chi., vp 

Owen .x Chappell, N. Y., media dir 

BBD&O, H'wood. asst to vp 

Carl Riblet jr Co. Chi., accl exec 

Same. \p 

Alley ci Richards. N. Y., pres (effective Jan 11 

Partner in new Willsted .x Schactcr Agency, V V 



•> .. asst l.i 



3 SO) 



V 






88888888, 

' ''- A 

■ill 



8i88g: 



: 












' 



I 



w. 






m 



■■:■■'-.■■■ ■';■ ■ 
1 






New and Renewed Television (Network and Spot) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY NET OR STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time start, duration 



Anheuser-Busch Inc 

( ltu.lv.. is. r Iter) 

trnold Bakers Co 
Beverwych Breweries 
Brown S W ill,.,,,,-.,.. 
Tobacco < .. ( Kools) 



Bulova W ,.n I. Co 
(California Fruit (.rower- 
Exchange < Sunk isi i 
D. I.. Clark Co 
Doublcda) ,x Co 
Drugstore Television 

Products 

Emerson Drug ( *> 

Evcrsharp I'"' 
fashion Frocks I", 

General Tire It.str ,,i t 

llu.lson Dealers 
Kendall Mfr Co 

Francis II. Liggett Co 

I „,|,,,- In. 

Mil. ola Mini.it .V Mtr 

I ., 

v! llliam Montgomer) < .. 

National Carbon < •■ 

Pcler Paul 1... ( Mound.) 

Philip Morris & Co 1 id 

P Scientific < orp 

Pond's Extract < .. (Tissues 
Procter .x Gamble I •• 

(Oxydol) 
It J Reynold, I ., I ( ,,,,.!. 
It.,.,.,,,, Art Metal \\ „rk- 

Semca Watch Co 
Sterling Drug i n 

Transcontinental .K w . ■• . 

Mrlin.s In, 

I ,,,,..1 \,, I In. 

I ,,,.. .1 I roil I n. 
W . si.,,, ni.rull < .. 



Harry 

llento. I & Howies 

MrCann-Frirk 

led Hates 



Biow 

Foote, < one .x Belding 

BBD&O 
Huber Hogc 
Fisher 

BBD&O 

Biow 

llruck 

BBD&O 

Klor. s-( arlcr 

Bennett, W alther « 

Mc.dailicr 
Peck 

Mathes 

BBD&O 



Van Sant-Daycall 

Estj 

Brisacher, Wheeler .x 

Staff 
II,.,,. 
( ayton 

I \\ II,. .nips.,., 

Ii,,,,. ., I Itzgerald .v 

Sample 
I tj 

(.rev 

Moss 

Dancer, Fitzgerald .x 

Snmt.lc 
BBD&O 



N W. Vver 

BBD&O 

Calkins .x II. ,1,1, 



W I Its. I V net 

WNBT, N. Y. 
W BZ-TV, Boston 

W Mil. N. •* . 
w Mt\\ . W ash. 
WBZ-TV, Host,,,, 

KMtll. Hollywoo 

\\ PI /. Phila. 

\\ Mll.t. Chi. 

W'RCK. S, h. ... 

W ABD, N. ■. . 

WCHS-T\ . V ■* . 
WNBT, N 1 
DuMont-1 \. net 

WNBQ, ( hi 
\\( It-.- I \ VI 

W Mtl . \ ■* 

W Villi. V ■* . 

V. PI /. Phila. 
W Mill. \. \ 
W PTZ, Phila. 

W ABD, N. > 

W Mtl. V ■» . 
W Mt\\ . W ash. 
W It/- I \ . Host,,,, 
W PTZ, Phila. 
W PTZ, Phila. 

KMtll. Hollywoo 

WPTZ, Phila. 

WNBT, V t 

« Mt(>. Chi. 
\\ Mt\\ . W ash. 

wcns-i\ n . 

w i it-.- 1 \ ... I 

W .nil. N. i 
w ilili. \. Y, 
DuMont-1 \ net 

w Mtu. < hi. 

\\ Mill N 1 
W MID. V V 
WNBT, N. x . 

W \lt\\ . W ash. 

WBZ-TV, Boston 
WPTZ Phila. 



sat 8-9 p 



Ken Murray's Blarkoi 

( 52 » ( .. ) 
film -pots; Dec I; 52 wks (n) 
film annemts; Dec 3: 21 wks (rl 
Film spots; Dec 21 : 52 wks (,,) 



film spots; Nov 21 : .52 wks Ir) 
film spots; Dec 12; 2(1 wk- ( .. | 



Film spots; Jan 7; 13 wks In) 

You \r. \n \rlisl; Tu 11-11:1(1 pm; Dec 2<) ; I .-. wks In) 

Cavalcade of Hands; I.. 9-10 pm; 52 wks In) 

film spots; Jan 5; 52 wk- In) 

film annemts; Jan .1 : .t") wks (r) 
Film a. inc. ..Is; Jan " ; 13 wks In) 
film -pots; Nov 2!t; 1.1 wks (r) 

I.,-, Ices; W.d 7:45-8 pm; Dee It; 52 wks In) 

film annemts: Dec 15; 13 wks (r> 



It. i 



m: M-l 12:30-1 pm; Jan .1; 52 



Johnnj Olscn's «>. 

(n> 
Slid..; Jan 2; II wks In I 
Film spots; Jan 1; I.l wks (r) 



film s ; \,,, 2H: 52 wk. In) 

Film spot- ; Jan 2; 2 1 wk. In) 
lil... spots; Nov 23; 2(. wk- In) 

Film spots; 1 I : 52 wk. (r) 

lil... .pots; Dec <>; 52 wks (r) 
Film spots; Jan I; 21 wks lii) 
Film spots; Jan 7; 52 wks I n > 

1,1 Wynn -!...» ; -s.ii 9-9:30 pm l Ian 7; 52 wks In) 

film spots; Jan 25: 52 wks III) 
film .,...!-: Nov 2(.: 52 wk- In) 
(Ikav Mother: M-f 1-1 :.'!<» pm: 11.. 12; 52 wk. (rl 



I 



s; Jan I ; 



I .. I 



film spot.; Nov 19; 2<> wk. In) 
film spots; Dec 12: 52 wk. In) 
film .! ; Dec 12; 52 wks (r) 



,,...8;;^::*i 




12.5% OF ALL 
IOWA BARN 
OWNERS HAVE 
RADIOS IN 
THEIR BARNS 





47.5% OF ALL 
IOWA FAMILIES 
HAVE TWO OR 
MORE RADIOS IN 
THEIR HOMES 



i 


yS ^A 















IOWA 

EXTRA SETS 

MEAN EXTRA 

LISTENING! 



51.9% OF ALL 
IOWA CAR OWNERS 
HAVE RADIOS 
IN THEIR CARS 





9.7% OF ALL IOWA 
TRUCK OWNERS 
HAVE RADIOS IN 
THEIR TRUCKS 



A HE 1949 Iowa Radio Audience Survey* proves 
that multiple-set ownership means additional lis- 
tening — that the number of hours of extra listen- 
ing is in almost direet proportion to the number 
of extra sets. (In homes having four or more sets, 
for example, an average of 67.7% of the families 
use two sets simultaneously, daytime, as against 
26.4% with only two sets.) 

Iowa families are really radio-equipped. 45.7% 
of them have two or more sets in their homes 
. . . 51.9% of all car-owners have car radios . . . 
9.7% of the truck-owners have radios in their 
trucks . . . 12.5% of the barn-owners have 
radios in their barns! 

More than that, the 1949 Survey shows that radio- 
minded Iowa families listen more than twice as 
much to WHO as to any other station. This top- 
heavy preference for WHO of course applies to 
multiple-set families as well as to single-set families 
— hence gives advertisers a substantial bonus audi- 
ence that is mil ordinarily measured. 

The Iowa Radio Audience Survey is a Ml ST for 

2 JANUARY 1950 



every advertiser who wants to know all about Iowa 
listening. Ask us or Free & Peters for your free 
copy, today! 



* Tin- 1919 Edition is the twelfth annual 
Study of radio listening habits in Iowa. 
It was made by Dr. F. L. Whan of V> ichita 
I niversity — is based on personal inter- 
\iews with over 9.000 Iowa families, sci- 
entifically selected from cities, towns, vil- 
lage* and farms all over the State. It is 
widel) recognized as one of the nation's 
most informative and reliable radio re- 
search projects. 

WHO 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. It. J. Calmer. President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 




FREE & PETERS, INC. 

National Representatives 



15 



for profitable 
selling 

000* 

WDEL 

WDEL-TV 

WILMINGTON 

O E L AWA R E 

WEST 

EASTON 

PEN N S YLVA N 



HARRISBURG 

PENNSYLVANIA 



WORK 



YORK 

NN SYLVAN I I 



WRAW 

READING 

PENNSYLVANIA, 



WGAL 

WGAL-TVl 

LANCASTER 

PtNNSYLVAN I A 



Clair K. McColIough 
Managing Director 

Repmon tod by 



robert MEE KER 

ASSOCIATES 

loi Anqelei New York 

Son Froociico Chicago 



STEINMAN STATIONS 





Mr. Sponsor 



i^eroy A, Van Bomel 

President 
National Dairy Products Corporation, New York 



Leroy A. Van Bomel. nattv. gray-haired president of National 
Dairy Products Corporation, is a man who has never wasted too 
much time nor missed many opportunities. Van Bomel became head 
of the corporation in 1941. Eight years later Dairy's annual record 
of sales jumped from 431,000,000 to more than 900.000.000. In 
1946. when Bing Crosln balked at doing live shows, after selling 
Kraft products for a decade. \ an Bomel signed Al Jolson. At that 
lime Jolson was the most highly publicized and sought-after enter- 
tainer in tlie country. It was the year his picture The Jolson Stor\ 
gripped the heart ol the nation. For the next two seasons the aging, 
tan-faced singer kept Kratt sales geared to peaks set b\ Crosby. 

The stor\ of Van Bomels fruitful career reads like a Hollywood 
scenario of an American saga. National Dairy s first executive has 
been an errand boy, clerk, bookkeeper, store manager and milkman. 
In 1908 he was graduated from the New York I Diversity School of 
Kngineering. The following year he was a junior engineer for the 
Sheffields Farms Company; 21 \ears later he was president of the 
firm. From delivering milk to guiding the operations of a multi- 
million dollar national concern, Lero) \. Van Bomel has made the 
transition with supple grace. 

Throughout the years. Van Bomel has been eager to find new im- 
provements for the dair\ industry. As president of Sheffields Farms, 
he was the firsl to introduce \ ilamin I) and homogenized milk. He 
began using radio a- an advertising medium for Sheffields as earl) 
as 1031. 

Today, the major portion of National Dairy's estimated $18,000,- 
nun annual advertising budget is used to sponsor three AM network 
programs: The (heat Gilder sleeve: Marriage For Two: and Dorothy 
Dix At Home; in addition to local, regional spot> and programs for 
7d of tin- corporation s OS subsidiaries. For 1950 the compam will 
spend approximately $1,000,000 in television. It will continue to 
sponsor the high-Hooperated kid show Kukla, Fran and Ollie, Tues- 
daj and Thursday, CBS-TV net. 6-6:30 pm. Among national adver- 
tisers Dairv has the seventh largest TV budget in the country but 
ranks first among food corporations. Since Dair\ has alwavs spir- 
itedly supported new media, the corporation may increase its planned 
television appropriation for 1950 and raise its video budget standing. 



16 



SPONSOR 



WE'RE JUST N(/TS 
ABOUT BASKETBALL 

■n INDIAN iV 




# Along about this time of year — every year— all Indiana goes a little wacky 
over basketball . . . both collegiate and high school basketball. 

The so-called Hoosier hysteria lasts from late fall— after the football 
season — until early spring. It's been that way for 2 5 years or more. 

Located as we are in Bloomington, the home of Indiana University which 
also has two good-sized high schools, we're right in the middle of things. 
It's just good programming to give the people all the basketball they want 
... in great big doses. 

WTTS (the designated sports station for I.TJ.) is the ONLY station carry- 
ing ALL Indiana University games, both at home and away. And, that isn't 
all. WTTV is televising EVERY home game of the two Bloomington high 
schools. Our listeners tell us they like it. And, so do our sponsors, for we're 
really delivering the audiences. 



LET OUR NATIONAL REPS. GIVE YOU THE COMPLETE STORY 



k WTTS 

m. A Regional Station 
on the Air 20 Hours 
a Day. — - 



RADIO AND TELEVISION CENTER • BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA 1 

Owned and Operated by Sarkes and Mary Tarzian 



WTTV 

Indiana's Second 
TV Station. 



Represented Nationally by 

WILLIAM G. RAMBEAU CO. 

360 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 



National Representatives 
BARNARD & THOMPSON, INC. 
299 Madison Avenue, New York 



2 JANUARY 1950 



17 



Y«»ir developments on SPO\SOR stories 



|I.S 



Spp • "They're seasonal advertisers" 
Issue: March, 1948, p. 44 

C,.L: _i. . New antihistamine drug 

->uDjecr. c|jcks 



Less than one month alter Bristol-Myers C pan) en- 
tered its product in the newl) created and highl) com- 
petitive antihistamine cold tablet market, sales totaled 
mure than $500,000. Resistab ranks high among the 

leader* and show- signs of soon leading the park. 

The new drug has been produced, marketed and sold 
at a blistering pace. Twenty-nine days after the formula 
was established, the product was being sold in 38,000 
drugstores in 23 Midwestern and eastern states and parts 
of Canada. It look Bristol-Myers onl) three days to 
select an agenc) (Kenyon and Eckhardt) to decide upon 
a budget, product-name and package design. In a prece- 
dent-breaking decision, the compan) s top brass sched- 
uled an estimated SI .()()( ).()()() advertising budget for Re- 
sistab. This is the largest sum that Bristol-Myers has 
ever spent to advertise a new product. In the past, the 
compan) has used conservative amounts to publicize its 
new drugs. The public has long been waiting for a cold- 
stopper drug and Bristol-Myers is prepared to convince 
it that Resistab is the best buy. 

\ sizable part ol the Resistab budget is being used for 
an extensive radio announcement campaign. Kenyon and 
Eckhardt has placed these announcements on 1 15 stations 
in the iia'ion s cold-suffering areas. 



|».$. 



See ! "How terrific is transit radio?" 
IsSlie: September 1948, p. 44 

Subject' Transit Radio wins D. C. 
decision 



The decision of the District of Columbia Public Serv- 
ice Commission to uphold Transit Radio will probabl) 
halt am contemplated action against the organization in 
other <ities. Officials of Transit Radio confidently feel 
that the favorable ruling will be followed b) other city 
commissions in the event similar complaints are lodged 
against it b\ groups opposing the system. 

Surveys taken in Washington. I). C. showed that the 
residents overwhelmingly favored entertainment on street- 
ears and busses. Onlv 6.6' < of those interviewed op- 
posed Transit Radio. In almost all of the 17 additional 
cities where Transit Radio is in use. surveys revealed that 
more than 90' < of the people polled approved of the 
novel idea. Of the 1300 streetcars and busses operated 
b\ the Capital Transit Compan) in 1). C. radio equip- 
ment has been installed in 212. The rest will be equipped 
shortly after year's end. Programs are beamed to the 
vehicles b) WWDC-FM. 

In St. Louis, the Post-Dispatch has heatedl) cam- 
paigned against Transit Radio. Radio men have been 
stunned by the furv of the Post's attacks, in view of the 
lavish praise accorded Transit Radio bv < itv inhabitants. 
When St. Louis riders were polled, 87.1 f c favored the 
program: 7.3' < had no opinion; and only 5.6$ object- 
ed. Transit Radio is here to stav. and b) the end of 1950 
it will be unveiled in ">2 more cities. 




18 



SPONSOR 




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BAY AREA WITH... 



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KKON-TV's modern antenna was created espe- 
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Telecasting from "Television Peak"- —atop 
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For "Clear Sweep" television advertising in 
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New York, Chicago, Detroit, Atlanta. Fort Worth. Bollywood. 
KRON-TN offices and studios in tlie San Francisco 
Chronicle Building, 5th and Mission Streets, San Francisco 



2 JANUARY 1950 



19 





Dancing cigarette pack is one of TV's outstanding commercials. Keesely is doing the briefing. 



Backstage 
al Leiineii 




A report on how 

an acl agency radio 
department functions 



over-ail 



Last Fall comedian Fred 
Allen's handy Hooperating 
nosedived from a comfortable spot in 
the 20"s to half that within a few 
months. As his Hooper fell. Allen's 
famous blood pressure rose. At one 
[joint — in a wr\ gesture of defiance — 
lie took out a $5,000 insurance policj 
to cover am listener who lost out on 
prizes offered b\ the show had lured 
his audience. But. month after month. 
Slop the Music kept stopping Mien. 
It eventually became number two on 
the Hooper parade. Lennen & Mitchell 
— first agencj to take an option on 
Stop the Music had picked anothei 
w inner. 

Because Lennen & Mitchell has a 
long record of such successes — and be- 
cause it's one of the top twentj agen- 
< ies in the country — SPONSOR has se- 
lected it for tlii- reporl on how an 
agenc) radio department function-. 



21 




Clark Agnew, Keesely discuss new TV ideas with Ray Vir Den, president of Lennen & Mitchel 



ft<*i/ to cover photo 

1. Nicholas E. Keesely, V.P. in charge of 
radio department. 

2. Larry Holcomb, radio and television di- 
rector, talent specialist. 

,"{. Bernard McDermott, traffic manager; 
mails records, film to stations. 

|. Clark Agnew, TV art director; designed 
TV stage from this model. 

.>. Peter Keveson, copy chief who writes all 
TV commercials. 

ii. Prank Daniel, chief timebuyer, show.i 
reading SPONSOR. 

7. Sidney Hertzel, assistant timebuyer, with 
coverage map. 





WEEKLY CONFERENCES BRING TOGETHER MEM 



The agency's list of radio winners 
md firsts reads like a pinpoint history 
>f broadcasting. It was: 

1. First to air play-by-pla\ base! all: 

2. First to put big bands like Paul 
Whiteman and Fred Waring on 
radio; 

3. First to put microphones in front man who's directly responsible for ex- 
of such personalities as Eddie penditure of this money is Nicholas F. 
('alitor. Tyrone Power, and Bob (Nick) Keesely, agency vice president 
Hope. in charge of radio and television. 

Currently, a large slice of L&M's Working under him is a staff which 

per thousand dollars of billing is 
probabh the most compact of any 



a large slice of L&M's 
nnual billing I one-third i 
iocs into radio and television. The 



$15,000,000 annual billing (one-third) 



Ray Vir Den (left), members of radio staff listen to new Lustre-Cream musical commercial 



22 





m 



■j 




!lHE LENNEN & MITCHELL RADIO DEPARTMENT AND ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES. KEESELY GIVES THEM UP-TO-DATE PICTURE OF WEEK'S ACTIVITIES 



agenc) radio department in the coun- 
try. It is built around seven ke\ men: 
Larry Holcomb, radio and television 
director; Frank Daniel, chief time- 
buyer: Sidne\ Hertzel. assistant time- 
buyer; Peter Ke\eson. vice president 
in charge of TV and radio copy; Frank 
Buck I no relation to the explorer), 



radio writer; Clark \gnew, TV art di- 
rector; and Bernard McDermott. traffic 
The department is small because its 
members have the efficiency that comes 
with long experience, keesely points 
mil that "the radio background of 
I. airs Holcomb and myself alone adds 
up to more than fort\ \ears." lAMs 



philosophy in general is that compact- 
ness, with good men in each job. is 
preferable to having an abundance of 
half-baked men around. (As Ray \ ir- 
den. president of L&M puts it: "We 
don't have a gang of impio-ai io- 
wearin^ suede shoes. These are all 
solid radio men."' i 



Dennis James, Old Gold TV announcer, confers on script with Keesely Keesely and Larry Holcomb give AM Amateur Hour usual going over 




RrflTRE-tT instead of 

Old Golds 




Poker-playing cartoon figures are from animated film L&M made for Lysol; they represent germs 




The exuberant peanut man is Bert Parks, MC of both AM and TV editions of "Stop the Music' 



To get a closeup picture of how 
keeselev's staff functions, lets take a 
spo ific radio problem and follow it 
through from beginning to end. A new 
L&M sport radio campaign for Lustre- 
Creme shampoo is ideal for this pur- 
pose — and it's just getting into full 
sw ing as \ ou read this. 

The campaign features a "Dream 
girl, dream girl . . . Lustre-Creme 
shampoo girl" song set to the music 
of Victor Herbert's "Toyland." The 
idea for this commercial, incidently. 
came from Phil Lennen. chairman of 
the board at L&M. This illustrates a 
cardinal principle at L&M: anyone 
from top to bottom in the agency is 
likel) to contribute ideas. If you 
wanted to come up with a slogan for 
L&M. "Every man an idea man," 
would be as good as an\ . 

The Lustre-Creme song is the first 
and. to date, onl) commercial use of 
Victor Herberts music which the com- 
poser's estate has allowed. Officials of 
the estate permitted this use because 
the) felt it was dignified and non- 
offensive. Originally, the "dream-girl"* 
hitchhiked on various Colgate network 
shows. But she was such an effective 
saleswoman that the L&M radio execu- 
t'\e idecided to suggest a "dream girl" 
spot campaign to the client. The 
Lustre-Creme people thought well of 
the suggestion, approved a test cam- 
paign. 

The test was carried out in three 
representative cities. I tica. Harris- 
lung, and Peoria. To get an accurate 
measurement of the spot campaign's 
effectiveness, the radio department 
called in L&M's research staff under 
Todd Franklin (as it usualK does on 
a spot campaign). The researchers 
compiled cross-sectional lists of resi- 
dents in the three cities. Then, be- 
fore the -pots went on the air. they 
interviewed residents, asked questions 
about Lustre-Creme advertising. The 
questions were designed to test remem- 
brance value, or "penetration." as the 
research men put it. 

\fter the spot- bad been used over 
the air for thirteen week-, the research- 
ers started asking questions again. 
Answers llii- time -bowed a definite in- 
< ica.-c in penetration which was direct- 
K attributable to the radio spots. On 
purpose, the cop) used for the spots 
had emphasized different points from 
copy used in other media. Things 
local residents remembered about 
Lustre-Creme showed to what extent 
i Please turn to page 40 I 



24 



SPONSOR 



The rains time, 




KITE weather reports helped get them back to normal, and Joske's 



the merchandise went 



San Antonio was submerged, but Joske's 

department store was a sellout 



®\\ hen Joske's Department 
Store. San Antonio, Texas, 
planned a four-day sale be- 
ginning Monda\ . 24 Oetober, it looked 
like clear sailing ahead. The public 
was well aware of it via newspaper ads 
and Sunda\ announcements on radio 
stations WOAL and KITE. The Joske 
staff — largest in Texas — was on its 
toes to start the tremendous stock of 



bargain-price merchandise moving at 
the word go. 

Fifteen minutes after the store 
opened, it was plain the word "go" had 
been countermanded in higher-up 
headquarters having nothing to do 
with department store advertising and 
sales. The heavens let go with a tor- 
rential cloud burst which deluged San 
Antonio, resulting in a citywide flood. 



Two people drowned, firemen rescued 
scores from flooded homes and sub- 
merged automobiles. Bus service was 
suspended, or re-routed on most lines. 
Bridges were declared unsafe, some 
disappeared completely. Business and 
communications were largely washed 
awa\ . 

Chances for the success of the sale 
i Please turn to i><iiic 60 I 



Abandoned cars were a common sight the morning of the big Joske sale By nightfall, all was clear in Alamo city except Joske's aisles 





fl NEVER PUT # 

BANANAS IN THE . f 
J REFRIGERATOR J' f 





NOBODY5 GOING TO 
TELL A\E WHAT E 
NOT TO DO 




Hottest thing in radio 



If you haven't got a 



singing commercial, chance* are you'll have one soon 



f X Singing commercials are a 
]jj going institution — and get- 

\^ _y tin- Wronger. Jingles arc 
here In sta\ because the\ are selling 
the goods. 

The commercial technique that ger- 
minated with the Pepsi-Cola jingle of 
1939 has produced a bumper crop. It s 
a rare radio hour that passes without 
at least one sample. The listeners can- 
not escape them; it's logical to assume 
that fewer sponsors will escape them 
in the future. Singing commercials 
have become a part of the American 
scene, not onh in the field of radio. 



but via l\. juke boxes, sheet music 
and the all-embracing worlds of slang, 
catch-phrases and humor. 

To date, the majority of jingles are 
aired to sell low-priced, quick turn- 
over items. The concensus is that it is 
largel) limited to such categories as 
foods, drugs, soft drinks, cosmetics 
and clothing because of the competi- 
tive angle. The advertiser in any cate- 
gor) follows the leader when a proven 
technique is developed. But the versa- 
tile jingle, employed as an institution- 
al device, and as a heaw industry 
salesman, would be as successful. Lack- 



awanna Railroad and De Soto cars, in 
the institutional and heavy-goods group 
— use jingles, and they mav well be 
starting a trend. \t present, however. 
they are not designed to sell, being 
used for their remembrance value. 

\\ li\ is the jingle concept expanding? 
Listeners, questioned indi\ idualh . tend 
to sum up jingles as an abomination 

To clarif) the picture, sponsor pub 
lishes. on these pages, results of a con 
hdential survej recent!) completed bv 
one of the top advertising agencies 
These findings are highh enlightening 
and useful. 



Ifotr '/»«•!/ Ii/cc> siiM/iiMj commercials: in irhol«» and part 



ailHlPIIrP rPArtinil showin, 3 preference +o singing versus 

CIUUICIIl/C I CQvllUII non-singing 60-second announcement 



68% 



preferred 

singing 
oonmerolhle 



28% 



preferred 

non-singing 
commercials 



4% 

|.|.».>.-H-K' t.MI 



To gain first-hand audience reaction, listeners were exposed to a 
single announcement for a tobacco product in two versions, 
asked to state a preference. Jingle version won hands down. 



second-by-second approval and 



bined singing -talking commercial 



96% 



like 
singing 

introduction 



like 

straight 
talk 
section 



Ilka 

singing 
conclusion 



Reaction to component parts of commercial was gained via 
paper and pencil technique. On attitude scale, listeners checked 
boxes marked very interesting, fairly interesting, not interesting. 



26 



SPONSOR 



I his stud) reveals the reactions <>l 
over 600 men and women evaluated on 
a behavior, rather than a verbal, basis. 
The agency corralled uninhibited re- 
sponses b\ asking its questions <<\ 
studio audiences during actual broad- 
casts of singing and straight commer- 
cials. The results show an almost com- 
plete about-face on the verball) ex- 
pressed "I cant stand those singing 
commercials." 

Entrance into this increasingl) com- 
petitive held is not, as some uniniti- 
ated advertisers suppose, a matter <>l 
hiring someone who contributed to the 
poetry corner in the school paper. Nor 
is it a form of advertising which can 
be bought for a song. It's a highl) 
specialized, often expensive, technique. 
Jingles can varj in the cost of creation 
from no appreciable cost i when writ- 
ten by an agency staffer I to $1,000 
and up when written by a freelancer. 
Production costs range from several 
hundred dollars to over $3,000 for re- 
cording sessions. 

Pepsi, widely thought ol as papa of 
the jingle, wasn't the first to use it. 
Sachs Quality Furniture pioneered in 
the technique in the crystal set era. 
The theme songs of such old-timers as 
the Julia Sanderson - Frank Crumit 
show and the Blackstone Plantation 
were so well-known as to qualifv as 
commercials of a sort. Put Pepsi was 
first to win a nation. More impor- 
tant, it wrapped up the entire sales 
story in four simple lines — an achieve- 
ment rarelv equalled. 

The Pepsi-Cola commercials was 
written by Alan Kent and Austin Her- 
bert Chrome-Johnson, who teamed up 
in '38. Kent, then an NBC announcer, 
I Please turn to page 52 I 




PIONEERS Alan Kent and Austin Chrome-Johnson knocked off Pepsi jingle in five minutes 




■ 



"THE STORE that jingles built." Singing commercials were responsible for Sattler's new plant 

mat's tiours? - "RED TOP BEER/" 




MERCHANDISING of jingles is brisk and bright, giving added impact to forceful technique 



II hat men and women like and dislike iiio.sl in eommereial announcements* 



like 



after being asked to name an example of the "best" 
advertising they had heard, and why they liked it 



Men 

1. Short 

2. Good taste, natural 

3. Humor, entertaining 

4. Jingle 

5. Part of program 



Women 

1. Jingle 

2. Interesting, human 

3. Short 

4. Instructive 

5. Straight, simple 



dislike 



after being asked to name an example of the "worst" 
advertising they had heard, and why they disliked it 



Men 
7. Stupid, childish 

2. Repetitious 

3. Jingle 

4. Too long 

5. Noisy, irritating 



Women 
7. Stupid, childish 

2. Jingle 

3. Noisy, irritating 

4. Too long 



'Survey completed by leading advertising agency late in 1949 reveals what listeners specially like and dislike in commercials generally. Con- 
ducted on a behavior, rather than a verbal basis, the survey uncovered actual studio reactions of over 600 persons. 



2 JANUARY 1950 



21 




Greater Ixtuisville First Federal Savings and I.oan Association 

iit Wtm M«*i —mi i ......n. j ...,..>. 

CONDENSED STATEMENT 

At tbr Dom of Biuoraa Orlobrr 31, IMS 



On results: Flexner .vutit.v up 25 years' experience 



"The outstanding lesson I have 
learned in atlvertisiiifi in my 
many years' experience with 
radio is this — / do not believe 
advertising is a thing that ran 
be tried. It must be done con- 
sistently through the years. I 
see many advertisers who try 
n thirteen-titnes contract on the 
radio, or who run a whole page 
advertisement in the local 
newspaper and expect the cus- 
tomers to rush in in droves. I 
have found by experience that 
it tloesn'l happen that way. 
It takes consistent hammering 
iff the message." 



Resources 




Liabilities 




Caah and 


I 74. 730, 703 IS 
». <K O0JI 


Pull-paid Income Shares and 

Option*] Savings Sham 1 25 MS.Mtt 1 4 


F»*pf»] Horn* J.nan Bank Stock. . 


. ... <. 


PWdfrd Sham-Mortfaf* LoAIU. 


11 211 1(1 




42X70 00 








:*.mo 34 


Du» Borrow m doani bring rlnaad) 


382,187.00 




126.514 01 


Paid in by Borrm-m for Tum . 


930 MO 31 




Hi hM 41 

34,021 M 


Accrued Riprnar* aivd Tain. . . . 
R«n« and Undivided Profit* . 






2 IM.780.7fl 


Tatal 


1 11.7M.22S4A 




r_ 







Tk« i-ary«r.t Savings and Loan Association In lb* Slat* of Kentucky 
Fa-aaale* 1 Orlsferr I. 10 U Fed»Talu#d Marti) », 1114 , . . InaruM October 29. 1)14 

r/»nsvnxr,*s leading home financing wsTnvnoN 

jr HI Y YOt R SAt I1VCS BOFSOS AM) STAMPS FROM IS * 




J 




Hon a radio-wi 
deposits from S25.04 

["his i> the story of a loan 
association that grew from a 
one-room business to a $31,- 
000,000 organization — and hands the 
credit to radio. 

\\ hen the Greater Louisville First 
Federal Savings and Loan Association 
set up shop on October 2, 1915, the) 
had a paid-in capital of $25,000. Their 
idea was to go into business, securing 
as many savings and investment de- 
posits as possible and then re-investing 
the mone) 1>\ lending it for home 
building. In 1027. after two years of 
radio advertising, the company had 
resources of three millions. Today. 22 
years and thousands of air-hours later, 
the Greater Louisville has deposits of 
more than $30,000,000 and an adver- 
tising budget that is three times the 
size of their original capitalization. 

From their early start in radio, back 
in l')25. when there was only one 
radio station in Louisville, to the pres- 
ent time, when the company sponsors 
52 programs a week, the Greater 
Louisville Wociation has steadily ex- 
panded their radio activit) and their 
business. "'When we first went on the 
air." savs Gustav Flexner. secretary- 
treasurer of the organization, "there 
was onl) one station. Hut v\e pioneered 
with ever) station that came into the 
field bought time on them. \nd I 
would sa\ that we have grown with 
radio in that we have made it the main 
medium of selling our Wociation." 

Gustav Flexner is in a good posi- 
tion to know. He is not the ordinary 
advertising executive. Not onl) was 
he responsible for his company's pio- 
neering in radio when it was a new 
and untried medium, hut with few ex- 
ceptions he has also written and read 
iiraclicallv everv commercial since his 



28 



SPONSOR 



Hr. Sponsor 

ivings association boosted 
» $31,000,000 




In the company's own studio, Flexner reads all commercials for the Association's program 



company first went on the air in 1925. 
The thinking behind the Flexner 
personal touch is simple enough con- 
sidering how fabulously well it has 
paid off: "Of course, there's the fact 
that customers get a kick out of com- 
ing into the office and talking to the 
person they heard over the air. But 
more important than that," Flexner 
says, "it just seems natural to me that 
I would know better how to talk about 
our business than an outsider would. 
And I think that knowledge gets across 
to the listener. He absorbs the confi- 
dence reflected in the announcer's 
voice. 1 think that if more organiza- 
tions who buy radio time could have 
their announcers come in and live with 
the business for a time, they'd see re- 
sults. When a listener hears a knowl- 
edge of what he's talking about in the 
announcer's voice, hes in a better 



mood to be sold." 

Flexner's name is never given over 
the air. although by now practically 
everyone in Louisville knows him. And 
he is modest about his own talents. "I 
recall one year at Derby Time,'' he 
says, "when I discussed reading the 
commercials with Graham McNamee. 
He told me one thing that I've tried 
to stick to all these years — to be my- 
self on the air. I don't believe I have 
the best voice in the country, but I do 
believe that I have developed the finest 
radio voice in the country for selling 
our institution." 

Transcribing the commercials for 
Greater Louisville's 52 programs takes 
about four hours of Flexner's busy 
week. He transcribes all of them i with 
the exception of the commercials for 
their live weekly Greater Louisville 
Hour i from his office desk, where he 



has a microphone and direct lines to 
each of his stations. After the tran- 
scriptions are made, the script, to- 
gether with the catalogue number of 
the musical selections chosen by Flex- 
ner's secretary, is sent to the various 
stations for broadcasting. For seven 
\ears Flexner not only wrote and an- 
nounced the commercials for his pro- 
grams, but also wrote and produced 
all the sound effects for a daily half- 
hour children's program. The pro- 
gram, which centered around the ad- 
ventures of a poin and a train, was 
dropped only because the Associations 
business was increasing so fast that 
Flexner could no longer spare the time 
to write it. Hut there are still a lot of 
Louisville adults who feel that the) 
grew up with a pom named Dixie and 
the Greater Louisville Special. 
(Please turn to page 59) 



This release reached the offices of SPONSOR after this article was written. We consider it so unusual and revealing that it is reproduced here 



ADVERTISING ASSOCIATES — COMPLETE ADVERTISING AND MARKETING SERVICE 



REGULAR AGENCY REPORT 



Louisville radio stations are planning a 
tribute on December 31 to the Greater Louis- 
ville First Federal savings & Loan association 
for their uilver Anniversary in radio advert- 
ising. The Company will begin its 25th consecut- 
ive year of radio advertising, starting the 
first of the year. On December 31, radio stat- 
ions VJHAS, WAVE, ;/AVE-TV, V.'GRC, IKSW, iXNH and 
3CKL0 will hold a special couuaemoration for 
Greater Louisville and for Jir. Gustav Flexner, 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Company and the aan 
behind the many successful years of Company ad- 
vertising. In addition, there will be a special 
dedication*- broadcast of one-half hour to be carried 
over all the local stations. 

Greater Louisville has grown with radio 
and has made radio the main medium of selling. 
The Company's first acquaintance with radio 



began on the night of December 31 , 1 '.•- . , 
a two-hour program of the opera, "Faust," was 
presented in its entirety. At that time, there 
were few stations on the air, few sponsored 
broadcasts and few radio sets, but the program. 
wqs well received. From then on. Greater Louis- 
ville sponsored a weekly broadcast each aturde- 
ni h t on ./HAS, kno;vn as "The Greater Louisvl. 
Hour." The program was broadcast for 24 con- 
secutive years, and it can still be heard ever 
ilKN and 7/KLO. This program is believed to be 
the oldest continuous radio show in the country. 

,«.a other Louisville radio stations ca^e 
Into beln,-, Greater Louisville bought tiue 
on them. Of the budget set aside for advertisi nc, 
the Company devotes three-fourths or it to 
radio, which takes care of its 57 shows per 
#ee!c . 



2 JANUARY 1950 



29 




1 *M I 

TOP RADIO SHOW IS ASSOCIATION'S "RAILROAD HOUR" ON N3C. GORDON MacRAE APPEARS HERE WITH LUCILLE NORMAN 

Railroads need better radio 

SPONSOR survey reveals few of them use broadeasting 

eonsistentlv or well 




To induce more of the pub- 
lic to use the nation's rail- 
roads when traveling, the roads must 
sell their product. 

Toda\. railroads do a minimum joh 
of informing the public that they exist, 
occasionally stress new facilities, and 
emphasize (heir important Tole in the 
building of America. 

The initiative <>f the railroads in 
purchasing impressive new rolling 
stock is mil matched b) a desire t<> ex- 
ploil what the) have to offer. I he 

point has been made thai most railroad 

heads are operational experts, not pro- 



"Railroad Hour's" promotion includes rail station posters, car cards, and some dining car menus motional experts. 

30 



SPONSOR 



Railroads use radio sparingly in 
their overall advertising campaigns, 
which are inadequate to start. Glen 
K. Bedenknapp, a member of the New 
York State's Public Service Commis- 
sion, accurately appraised the situa- 
tion, when he recentlj said: "A par- 
tial answer I to the railroads' problem 
of operating losses! lies in better meth- 
ods of merchandising . . . and in the 
development of better relations with 
the traveling public." 

During the past few months, sponsor 
has undertaken a canvass of the rail- 
roads of America. What are they do- 
ing in radio'.'' \\ hat do they hope to 
accomplish? 

From sponsor's studv comes the sus- 
pision that railroad men are hard to 
educate to an appreciation of adver- 
tising, that the radio industry has nev- 
er properly sold the medium to them. 
From this study, too, comes glimpses 
of why the airlines, bus lines, and oth- 
er travel mediums are taking the pro- 
motional play I and business I away 
from the railroads. Herewith is the rec- 
ord — as much as the study uncovered. 
America's $30,000,000,000 railroad 
industry probablv is spending more 
money in broadcast advertising today 
than ever heroic. Yet this amount — 
less than S4.000.000— is only a small 
fraction of its total expenditure of 
$25,000,000 or more in all media. 

The largest single broadcast item is 
the $l,000.000-a-ycar Railroad Hour 
sponsored by the Association of Amer- 
ican Railroads on NBC Mondav nights. 
After 10 years of concentration in 
magazines, the AAR switched the bulk 
of its expenditure to network radio on 
4 October. 1948, when The Railroad 
Hour was launched as a 45-minute pro- 
gram on ABC. Even with the move to 
NBC last 3 October, when the "Hour" 
became a half-hour. AAR cantinues to 
spend most of its monev in radio, with 
about $700,000 going to magazines. 

The Railroad Hour is paid for bv 
all but one of the nation's 135 Class 1 
railroads, in proportion to their operat- 
ing revenue. The single non-partici- 
pant is the Chesapeake & Ohio, whose 
stormy chairman. Robert R. Young, 
has established the Federation of Hail- 
way Progress as a rival to AAR. 

Some roads, such as the Pennsyl- 
vania, regard the Hour as "their" pri- 
mary broadcasting effort. A few. how- 
ever, have conducted, or are conduct- 
ing, fairly extensive broadcast cam- 
paigns of their own. 

For about 18 months during the 



.\o longer on I In- Air 




Conductor of "Your America" realizes, ambition 



C&O was sponsor of "Information Please" 



war. the Union Pacific (largest rail- call) over many stations, 
road advertiser, with a 82. 5< 10.000 The New York Central has been car- 
over-all annual budget I sponsored rying announcements in seven cities 
Your America, weekly "salutes" to in- consistently for three years, and last 
dividual industries and states, over April began a series of TV announce 
coast-to-coast networks, through Caples ments in New York. The Southern 
Company. During that period UP's Pacific (also FC&B I is not using the 
annual broadcast expenditure was air as heavily as it was. The Santa 
about $500,000. Last fall it sponsored Fe buys radio announcements now and 
a live-sports TV show in Los Angeles, then, is currently sponsoring a 13- 
It uses radio announcements periodi- I Please turn to page 55 i 

Currentlv on Television 




B&M program is based on drawings by Dahl 



Burton Holmes sells Southwest for Santa Fe 



2 JANUARY 1950 



31 



Before ynii junk 
your Commercial 



1.000 members of TV Critics Club 
reveal which favorite commercials 

make them purchase the product 



It may displease a lot of people and 
still sell a lot of goods. 

Just because a TV commercial isn't 
well liked is no reason to junk it. A 
commercial, on the other hand, may 
delight practically every viewer ex- 
posed to it and still not pay for itself 
in sales. Like or dislike of a commer- 
cial is in itself no criterion of the 
commercial's efficiency. 

Several of the best-liked brands re- 
ported in an American Management 
Counsel study (see table illustrating 



this story ) do not even appear on the 
list of products named by the same 
respondents in answer to the question: 
"Have any TV commercials or demon- 
strations influenced you to buy a prod- 
uct you never bought before?" 

This study was confined to the New 
York Metropolitan area covered by the 
circulations of the New York Herald- 
Tribune and Daily News. It was con- 
ducted by mail at the end of last Octo- 
ber among 2.000 members of the TV 
Critics Club. This is a group spon- 



sored by Look Hear, a commercial TV 
column written by Maxine Cooper and 
at present appearing once weekly in 
the News and Herald-Tribune. 

Of the 2,000 names selected at ran- 
dom from the Critics Club member- 
ship. 1.144 filled out and returned 
questionnaires. Slightly more than 
half of the questionnaires were re- 
turned 1>\ women, and nearly three 
quarters of these women were married. 
About 60% of the men who replied 
were married. 

Most of the women respondents 
were housewives — 64.8%. Secretary- 
bookkeepers accounted for 8.8% and 
students 4.6% . Occupations of the re- 
mainder of respondents were widely 
scattered, each accounting for less than 
2.0%. Only 4.0' y failed to list an 
occupation. 

The men respondents, instead of 
falling into one big occupational cate- 
gory as did the women, were spread 
widely over a dozen. Topping the list 
with 11.8% was non-factory skilled 
labor. Skilled factory labor accounted 
for 3.4%. Office workers accounted 
for 10.0%, followed closely by non- 
factory unskilled labor with 8.9' < . 

Right on the heels of unskilled labor 
came the professional category with 
8.7% • Student and management each 
had 7.0%. Government service, sales- 
man, non-active, proprietorship, and 
service categories ranged down from 
5.5% to 3.0%.Misellaneous accounted 
for another 5.1% and 15.4' < failed to 
specify an occupation. 

An impressive number of the people 
who bought cigarets as a result of 
a TV commercial not only bought Old 



I. SANKA tops coffees purchased. Molly Berg's commercials high 2. LIPTON commercials sell well, but don't show strong liability score 




Golds, but also said the) particularl) 
liked the commercials. The) are done 
live with an announcer and the danc- 
ing cigaret cartons. Of the L70 \ iew- 

ers who mentioned it, onl) 43 said 
the) disliked it. 

The choice of commercials was not 
influenced h\ a checklist. The ques- 
tion read simply: "If you particularl) 
like or dislike a TV commercial, list 
them under follow irig : il like: I dis- 
like). Thus the commercials named 
were spontaneous choiees. The same 
is true of the brands named as bought 
for the first time because of television. 

The Old Gold commercial, seen on 
ABC-TV's Stop the Musi,- and NBC- 
TVs Original Amateur Hour captured 
rtearl) a third of the 94 people of the 
sample who bought a new brand of 
( igarets because of television. Per- 
( entage-wise, the cigaret brands men- 
tioned lined up as follows: 

Old Gold 29.2', 

Chesterfield . 26.6 

Philip Morris . 17.0 

Pall Mall . 6.6 

I. inky Strike 4.7 

Camel 4.7 

Miscellaneous brands 1.8 

Brands not specified 9.4 

With the exception of Old Golds and 
Chesterfields, the commercial liking 
score for brands mentioned bore little 
if any significant relation to the degree 
to which they were purchased. This 
did not hold true for brands in ever) 
category, but it happened often enough 
to raise a serious question as to the im- 
portance of the "liking"" element. Cig- 
arets lined up this \\a\ : 



(Miislion: If 


5 on parliouhi 


irl^ 


liko or 


d 


i.sliko a TV 


commercial, list 


llll 


dor like 


dii 


ilike 




', Who Lik 


9 


No. Who Like 




Total No. of 


Product 


TV Commerc 


ai 


Commercial 




Respondents 


Chiclets 


98.1 




51 




52 


BVD 


95.3 




94 
93 
35 
250 
78 




98 


Ballantine 

Spcldcl 


94.9 


98 


94.6 


37 


Texaco 


90.0 


275 




85.7 


91 


Tide 


83.6 




82 
86 




98 


Lipton Products 


82.7 


104 




77.5 




49 
62 
127 
77 
50 




56 


Auto-Lite 


76.5 


81 


Old Gold 


74.7 


170 


Lucky Strike 


73.3 


105 


Chesterfield 


71.5 


70 


Camel 


71.0 




38 




52 


Pepsi-Cola 


61.9 




26 




42 


Borden Products 
Lincoln -Mercury 


56.2 




18 
41 




92 


54.7 


32 


Gillette 


42.9 




15 

11 

14 

3 




75 


Pall Mall 


20.0 


35 


Philip Morris 


16.7 


55 


Whelan Drug 


3.3 


84 



Rank in 
Rank in Liking 

Purchase Commercials 

Old Gold 1 1 

Chesterfield _ 2 3 

Philip Morris 3 6 

Pall Mall 4 5 

Luck) Strike 5 2 

Camel 6 4 

Three of the most disliked commer- 
cials, shown in chart at the head of 
this story, are those for Philip Morris, 
Pall Mall, and Gillette. They also hap- 
pen to be the same three commercials 
reported by the Starch continuing 
study of TV commercials as least liked. 
Nevertheless, both Gillette and Philip 
Morris rank well up in the list of new 



brands purchased as the result of 
watching television, according to tin 
\merii an Management Counsel report. 
\\ hether or not selling that irritates 
as many people as do these shaving 
and cigaret commedcials is good ad- 
vertising in the long run is another 
question. Most advertisers are in- 
clined to stick with what is getting 
current results. They figure to worn 
later about what to do when their 
advertising loses its punch. Gillette, 
of course, is the sponsor of top-drawer 
national sports events, as well as box- 
ing every Friday night from New 
^ ork. and other events such as the 
(Please turn to page 57) 



3. PHILIP MORRIS third in purchases, but commercials last in liking 



1, COLGATE first in dentifrice sales, as the kiddies pressure mom 




Mr. Advertiser: 

YOU CAN DO IT AS 

WELL (Maybe Better) 

AND FOR LESS 
with 

TELEWAYS 
TRANSCRIPTIONS 

The following transcribed 
shows now available 

AT LOW COST! 

JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 
260 15-Min. Hymn Programs 

SONS OF THE PIONEERS 
260 15-Min. Musical Programs 

RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 
156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

STRANGE WILLS 

26 30-Min. Dramatic Programs 

FRANK PARKER SHOW 

132 15-Min. Musical Programs 

MOON DREAMS 

156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

BARNYARD JAMBOREE 

52 30-Min. Variety Programs 

DANGER! DR. DANFIELD 
26 30-Min. Mystery Programs 

STRANGE ADVENTURE 

260 5-Min. Dramatic Programs 

CHUCKWACON JAMBOREE 
131 15-Min. Musical Programs 

Send for Free Audition Platter and 
low rates on any of the above shows 
to: 

TELEWAYS «oSuH?ons. 

8949 SUNSET BOULEVARD 

HOLLYWOOD 46, CALIF. 

Phones : 

CRestview 67238 • BRadshaw 21447 



RTS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS... 



—continued from page 2— 

Gilbert invades 
video research 

Gilbert Youth Organization has formed Gilbert Tele- 
vision Research Company, and will probe looker- 
listener reactions to TV commercials in home. 
Technique is based on portable projector which in- 
terviewer takes into living room — any living room, 
since it is battery-operated. Device repeats 
actual commercials, picture and sound. 

NARSR elects 
Avery president 

Lewis H. Avery of Avery-Knodel , Inc., has been 
advanced from treasurer to president of National 
Association of Radio Station Representatives, New 
York, succeeding Frank Headley of Headley-Reed. 
Richard Buckley of John Blair & Co., was named 
vice-president ; James LeBaron, RA-TEL Representa- 
tives, Inc., secretary, and Joseph Timlin, Branham 
Company, treasurer. Tom Flanagan continues as 
managing director. 

1,800 stations aid 
democracy contest 

More than 1,800 broadcasting stations — AM, FM and 
TV took part in nationwide "Voice of Democracy" 
radio script contest, sponsored jointly by NAB, RMA 
and U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce. One million 
high school students were entered. 

"Feature Foods" 
to go national 

After 15 years on WLS, Chicago, "Feature Poods" 
radio program and merchandising service is being 
expanded to other markets by Feature Radio, Inc., 
Chicago, headed by Lyman L. Weld and Paul E. Faust. 
Services for sponsors include checking distribu- 
tion, and position on shelves, "educating" grocers 
and clerks, arranging for promotions and checking 
displays. 

Video set sales seen 
rising 50% in 1950 

Don G. Mitchell, president of Sylvania Electric 
Products, relative newcomer in TV set-making, pre- 
dicted in year-end statement industry's TV set 
volume will be 3,750,000 in 1950, or 50 per cent 
more than in 1949. . .RMA — which has switched 
report on TV picture tubes from quarterly to 
monthly — said sales of these tubes in October 
were 100 per cent more than average for third 
quarter of 1949. 



34 



SPONSOR 




HO, $10 ISN'T 

OUR FREQUENCY 

ITS OUR N£W ADDRESS 

IN NEW YORK 



2 JANUARY 1950 



35 





Mr. Church 



The 

Picked Panel 
answers 
Mr. Shorin 

When the first 
electrical trans- 
cription library 
became available 
K M B C quit 
broadcasting 
phonograph rec- 
o r d programs. 
We subscribed to 
the idea that the 
listening public is 
entitled to music different from that 
already obtainable at any good record 
shop music recorded with highest 
possible fidelity, superior in quality to 
phonograph records. KMBC was one 
of the first subscribers to the World 
Library, recorded vertical cut by the 
Western Electric System, a superlative- 
ly fine recorded program service. 

Do ET programs utilizing libraries 
please the public'.'' Do the) build high 
ratings':' Do they please advertisers? 
Our experience at KMBC neables US 
i.i enthusiasticall) answer yes. 

"The Bandstand," broadcasl Late 
Saturda) afternoon bj KMBC for 
main \earsl and moic icreullx also 

bj KFRM I had rated as high as L0.1 
(Conlan, November, 1947) when an- 
othei K< ! station was cat 1 5 ing a Notre 
Dame football game! \t 1 :45-5 p.m. 
Mondays thru Fridays on KFBV1 "I In 
llantbtand" rated 2.."> in a (Ionian area 

survej I March. L949). 

■■ V Kansas Citj Dine-" is anothei 
program we have buill from the World 
Librarj on KMBC manj years, re- 
i enth also on KFRM. W hen it was on 



Mr. Sponsor asks... 



"Can a national advertiser build a profitable 

program by using a station transcription 

library?" 



Joseph E. Shorin 



President 

Topps Chewing Sum, Inc., N. Y. 



daily — Monday thru Saturday (>:1.> 
6:30 p.m. — Conlan rated it 13.8 and 
12.7 in February, 1939 and December, 
1940. This program has made a fine 
vehicle for spot announcements. 

"The Lynn Murray Show," built 
from the World Library, on KFRM. in 
March. 1949. showed a Conlan area 
rating of 3.1, darned good for Satur- 
day afternoon in the great open spaces. 

Our own transcription library of 
"The Texas Rangers'' which we s\ n- 
dicate nationally has gained Hooperat- 
ings as high as 27! 

Among our current largest sponsors 
of programs utilizing library ET's on 
KMBC are Borden — 6 quarter-hours 
weekly mid-afternoon — "The Dick 
Haymes" show: Purity Bakeries, 
Rutherford "HyPower" Chili and Ta- 
males, and B-C. 

Arthur B. Church 
President. KMBC-KFRM 
Kansas City. Missouri 



National Adver- 
tisers not only- 
can, but are find- 
ing profitable 
programs in sta- 
tion transcrip- 
tion libraries. 

While it is 
true that most of 
the top Hooper- 
ratings are held 
by dramatic and varietj shows, sur- 
vej has show n that, in the long run, the 
pul. Mr prefers music. Manx eminent- 
ly successful musical programs have 
been selling merchandise via the net- 
works for years, and. in a number of 
< ases, independent stations Mending 
showmanship with a smart selection of 
'■(aimed"' music have been successful 




Mr. Porter 



in actually swinging a larger audience 
than rival network stations with "talk 
programs. 

Music has wide audience appeal. If 
a national advertiser can find a profit- 
able musical vehicle on the networks, it 
follows that he can duplicate his suc- 
cess in individual markets with the 
station transcription library. First of 
all. the word "transcribed" no longer 
bears its once ugly stigma. Way back 
in 1938, in an audience survey that I 
conducted in Boston, it was found that 
the average listener preferred trans- 
scribed or recorded "name"' talent to 
equally good but relatively unknown 
"live" talent. Today a large percent- 
age of the top network shows are tran- 
scribed, and transcribed syndicated 
shows are enjoying good ratings. The 
public has stamped its approval on 
transcribed programs. — they are just 
as acceptable as "live"' shows, and 
often more so. 

Secondly . a good station transcrip- 
tion library will outperform a class 
"A" network line in the matter of 
fidelity- it is replete with the "big- 
gest" names in radio, contains distinc- 
tive musical arrangements especially 
produced for radio showmanship, and 
a tremendous amount of music unob- 
tainable "ii records. Librarj selec- 
tions varj in length from thirlx seconds 
In ten or more minutes making it pos- 
sible to pmduce shows without fading 
or cutting the music. The better tran- 
sci iption sen ices also contain a mj riad 
ill useful opening and closing themes, 
fanfare-, bridges, and interludes of all 
kinds, everything in the way of basic 
ingredients and production aids need- 
ed to produce a "live" sounding, top 
musical shoxx of an\ description 

w i\si ,,\\ T. Porter 
Sales Promotion Manager 
II INC, U inchester, I a. 



36 



SPONSOR 




There is no ques- 
tion about it. the 
answer is yes! It 
has been done. 
Marshall W ells 
has done it with 
success! 1 h c \ 
did it in adver- 
tising their Zenith 

brand of major 

Mr. Green i •• 

home appliances 

and Coleman heaters. Marshall Wells 
did il in Central Washington 1>\ using 
The Stars Sing during the day and 
That Man with a Hand in the evening. 
Initially signed for 26 programs. The 
Stars Sing was renewed four times for 
additional 26 program cycles. Tailor- 
made selling commercials, written by 
station continuity writers, were inte- 
grated with program script production 
aids and a featured singer each day 
(in this case supplied by Associated) 
to make The Stars Sing a polished pro- 
duction. 

For That Man with a Band a leading 
popular dance band was featured with 
a standard theme and a simple open 
and close identification. Commercials 
were '"to the point.'" Music during the 
show was segued. The program stood 
on the merit of popular music by popu- 
lar artists without hackneyed so-called 
''ginger bread" introductions. 

Each of the shows included dealers' 
names from cities of Central Washing- 
ton. No question was left in the listen- 
er's mind about where to go to get the 
product. Co-operating dealers and 
Marshall Wells shared the cost in this 
case. . . . The comment of one dealer: 
' . . . there was no other advertising 
used." and that '"the radio show opened 
more new contacts with buyers than 
any other advertising did." 

I ranscription companies spend mil- 
linns supplying stations with the best 
music in the world. Improving script 
-<•[ vices go with the music, voice tracks 
of the stars, special themes, promotion 
pieces. And that isn't all. they are 
regularly adding features to increase 
the flexibility of service to broadcasters. 

National advertisers can cash in on 
each local market b\ judiciously 
''beamed'" selection of day or night 
time, dependent on the product appeal. 
Program and sales staffs of each sta- 
tion can be of great value because of 
their familiarity with each market. 
W. M. "Bili."" Green 
Program Manager 
KPQ. It enatrhee. Washington 

2 JANUARY 1950 



Watch the 
New WDSU 

No Other New Orleans Station 

Offers Sponsors Such Complete Coverage 

of the Important Woman's World! 



Joyce Smith, Woman's Program Director, 
creates and cues her AM & TV programs 
to strike the rich, influential woman's mar- 
ket. Gardening -fashions -drama -cooking 
(featuring Lena Richards, nationally known 
Creole cook) — are among the varied pro- 
grams available to dollar-wise sponsors. 
Write for further details! 




EDGAR B. STERN, JR 
Portner 



ROBERT D. SWEZEY 
General Manager 



LOUIS READ 
Commercial Manager 




37 



It AKIIiV I.OOIIS 



I ISIIIX. KOOTS 



SPONSOR: Nolde Brothers Baker) VGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE I VSI HISTORY: Santa Clans and TV 

have combined their popularity with jruitjui results. In 
a three-time-a-week, half -hour presentation. "Santa Reads 
His Mail." Santa was shown eating a piece of holde s 
fruit cake. Since the first live commercial, 4 programs 
ago. over 1500 letters have poured in with 70' i men- 
tioning the sponsor or his products. Locally produced by 
the WTVR staff, the highly-successful program is in its 
second year. 
W l\R, Richmond, Va. PROGRAM: Santa Head- Hi- Mail 



SPONSOR: Biiflf- Trading Posl VGEN< \ : Not listed 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This pleased sponsor 

drew an immediate response from tlie lzaak Walton dis- 
ciples. Featuring a weekly sportsmen's show, plugging a 
different item each week, the bail this lime was a good 
buy on fishing boots. The results were jour persons in 
the store to buy before the program was off the air with 
a sell-out the next day. 



WHEN. Syracuse 



PROGRAM: Sportsmen's show 



— • 



TV 

results 



«*—*»— »«i« k ■ i n ii 



-J 



sipmi mviiki i 



SPONSOR: Forest Park Super Market 



VGENCi : Direct 



( \I-M I.I. CASE HISTORY: A half-ham and a chile 

bean dinner were the ''stars' of spot announcements on 
the "1 Hear Music" stanza (6:30-7 p.m. M-W \. As a re- 
sult. 89 full hams and 153 chile dinners were sold — a 
complete sell-out. The sponsor says: "1 still can't get 
over the immediate response to my 7 7 demonstrations.'' 



WICU, Eric Pa. 



PROGRAM: Spots 



AUTOMOBILES 


14 1 CREAM 


SPONSOR: St. Paul & W. R. Stephen- VGENCY: Direct 

Kuick Cos. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This Sunday evening 
newsreel program faced stiff competition with Walter 
Winchell as its radio opponent. Sponsors offered toy 
model Buick cars to the first 100 requests and more than 
1500 cauls, letters and telegrams were received the next 
day. i live commercial is used with a new Buick model 
driven into the 77 studio each day. 

WTCN-TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul PROGRAM: Movie Newsreel 


SPONSOR: General Ice Cream AGENCY: Not listed 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Winter weather was not 
a draw back to ice cream fans. Two ice cream suckers 
were offered to anyone Hatching Sealtest's three-time-a- 
week TV spot provided they would just send their names 
to the "Scaliest Ice Cream Man.' The offer was made on 
three consecutive broadcasts the result— 2,617 pieces of 
mail. 

WBEN-TV, Buffalo PROGRAM: Spots 


APPLIANCES 


MILLINERY 


SPONSOR: Watts Plumbing 8 Electric AGENCY: Direcl 

I VPSUL1 1 VS1 HISTORY: A one-minute commer- 
cial ikis enough to com line this compain of the selling 

powei of II . A studio demonstration of a G.E. electric 
Disposall unit was followed by an offer to absorb the 
$50 installation cost of the first 5 unlets received aftei 
the telecast. Dozens of calls were received. One from u 
viewer 100 miles away and one from a local home builder. 

KOTV, Tulsa PROGR \M: Spots 


SPONSOR: None 

1 VPS1 1 1 1 W. HISTORY : No sponsor, no standard 
commercials just results! kiauss Company's milliner 
offered a custom tailored hat as a "gimmick" on a wo- 
men's show. The very next day four orders for exact 
creations were received despite the fact the) retail for 
$50. Anil despite the fact, too. that few women n ill ever 
order exact duplicates. 

\\ DS1 1 \ . New Orleans PROGRAM: Joyce Smith a la Mode 




II, .MED, processed, edited and narrated com- 
pletely by fast-moving WBAP-TV newsroom per- 
sonnel is "Texas News," a 10-minute newsreel 
recently named the nation's best by the National 
Association of Radio News Directors. 

Aired at 6:45 p. m. Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday* on the Star-Telegram's 
WBAP-TV, an average "Texas News" covers 
eight stories — four from the Dallas area, and 
four from the Fort Worth area. No story is over 
2 \ hours old, and many of them develop as late 
as two hours before air time. 

"Texas News" staffers often travel over 300 miles 
by auto or chartered plane to get one story. Their 
filmed stories have been telecast repeatedly over 
NBC and other stations across the nation. 

"Texas News" is a top example of station pro- 
gramming. WBAP-TV, the Southwest's first tel- 
evision station, can serve you best in the Fort 
Worth-Dallas area. Complete facilities for live 
programs, commercial film production (program 
or spots) are at your disposal at WBAP-TV. Con- 
tact the station or Free & Peters for details. 

Sponsored by Texas Electric Service Co. Tuts.. Fri., Sun. and the 
Southwest Chevrolet Co. on Thnrs. 







FREE & PETERS, INC. Exclusive National Representatives 

Fort Worth Dttroit Atlanta San Frtnelico Chicago N.- York Hollr.ooJ 






2 JANUARY 1950 



39 




BACKSTAGE 

{Continued from page 25) 

they had been influenced directly by 
the radio copy. 

Soon after research had gathered 
this information and passed it on to 
the radio department, the "dream girl" 
was read) to tour the country. With 
the client's approval, plans now call 
for use of one-minute announucements 
in the leading markets during 1950. 
The markets selected are those where 
an extremely high proportion of U. S. 
drug sales take place each year so that 
the coverage can be considered nation- 
wide for Lustre-Creme purposes. Time- 
Inn cr Frank Daniel chose stations for 
the campaign on the basis of Hooper. 
Pulse, and BMB figures. But after the 
campaign has been under way for a 
while he and Keeseb will tour the 
country to get an on-the-spot impres- 
sion of the campaign's effectiveness, 
worked out locally. 

Such continuous checking of results 
used in the "dream-girl" commercials 
and to see how the various approaches 
radio department. Even when a client's 
sales are good in a given area. L&M 
is one of the important activities of the 
may recommend a change in the cli- 
ent's schedule. A case like this came 
up recently. One client had a series 
of evening newscasts on a regional net- 
work. New ratings revealed that while 
the regional network had fine listener- 
ship in several cities, it was weak in 
and out in the county. Timebuyer 
Daniel, together with Keeseb. worked 
out a better wa\ to use the advertiser's 
money. 

Their plan, which the client ap- 
proved, called for a switch to national 
network stations in the area: and a 
switch from news programs to spot 
announcements. The spots were bought 
during station breaks between top- 
notch network shows, insuring greater 
listenership distributed more evenly in 
both cities and farming communities. 

In addition to spot radio sampaigns 
like those described above, L&M has 
two network radio shows which are 
also on TV (Stop the Music and the 
iamateur Hour, both enjoying high 
ratings for Old Gold). Other programs 
are in preparation For other I.W1 
i lients. 

The Amateur Mom provides a good 
i \ainple of how the department func- 
tions on a network radio and telex ision 
problem. Its histon goes hack to last 
fall when Stop the Music was doing 



so well that it set the L&M radio men 
to thinking about a second Old Gold 
program. The) reasoned this way. 
Stop the Music had proved it was pos- 
sible to get a vast national audience at 
low average cost. Whv not try for the 
jackpot'.'' — to use a phrase made popu- 
lar b) another quiz program. Win not 
get a second relativelj low-cost pro- 
gram which appealed to another type 
of audience? 

The Original Amateur Hour, then 
up for sale as a package, filled the bill 
perfectly. While Stop the Music was 
along smart review lines, featuring 
popular songs included as much for 
entertainment as for quiz value, the 
Amateur Hour was homey. famil) en- 
tertainment which might present any- 
thing from a five-year-old crooner to 
bird imitations. Moreover, the Ama- 
teur Hour radio program was ideal for 
out of town origination. L&M, through 
short but significant previous experi- 
ence with the traveling Guy Lombardo 
program, had realized the merchan- 
dising value of a show which could 
make local appearances. 

Here was one factor which might 
have proved a hitch. Reemack Enter- 
prises, Inc.. the production organiza- 
tion representing the Major Bowes es- 
tate, wanted to sell the Amateur Hour 
as both a TV and AM package. But 
L&M had no obpjection to this, in fact 
welcomed the idea. One of the guid- 
ing principles at the agency is the be- 
lief that advertisers should get into 
television and stake out franchises early 
in the game. I In the spring of I'M!! an 
L&M report to clients on T\ created 
a stir b) warning that "time is ahead) 
running out on the establishment of 
great franchise for the future. . . .") 

Actually, when the Amateur Hour 
was first offered to sponsors last yeai 
by Reemack it had already gone on the 
air sustaining as a TV show i Duniont. 
Sunda\ night i . Reemack hoped atten- 
tion gained for the I \ show would 
help interest sponsors in reviving the 

AM presentation of the program: it 
had been off the air completer) for sev- 
eral years. This was decidedh new 
twist on the usual relationship between 
radio and T\ which the L&M radio 
men lelt was sound thinking, \fler all. 

the) reasoned, T\ had brought back 
wrestling, dog acts, acrobats, and ball- 
ing the jack. \\ In not the \male\n 

Hour? 

This seemed an even brighter 
thought when the TV Amateur Hour 
began to build up interest and become 



40 



SPONSOR 



one ot the most talked-about television 
programs. At this point, in JuK of 
1048. Nick Keesely, L&M president 
Ra\ \ ir Den, and Tom Doughten, ac- 
count executive, went to the P. Loril- 
lard Company and got approval for 
purchase of the A\l-T\ package. 

To select the time and station for the 
\\1 Amateur Hour, timebuyer Frank 
Daniel studied availabilities, compara- 
tive eosts. coverage, and the ratings 
of adjacent programs. This last fac- 
tor, in particular, influenced L &M s 
choice of Wednesday night on ABC. 
This was the night Bing Crosby, 
Groucho Marx, ami Milton Berle were 
on — all in a row. \nothed strong rea- 
son for choosing ABC was that Stop 
the Music was on this network as well; 
I AM could thus lm\ time from ABC 
at the highest discount rate. 

The TV Amateur Hour remained on 
Dumont Sunday nights where it had 
alread) begun to build up an audience 
as a sustaining program. 

Basically, the entertainment side of 
both the AM ami T\ programs was up 
to Rcemack. L&M's job was to con- 
vert the program into sales through 
effective commercials. Stop the Mu- 
sic s easy-going Old Gold commercials 
set the pattern For the AM Amateur 
Hour. The same announcer. Don Han- 
< cm k. was to be used to deliver low- 
pressure, down-to-earth, and conversa- 
tional air cop) in line with Old Gold's 
theme: "We're tobacco men. not medi- 
cine men." 

But what about the TV show ? 

Lennen & Mitchell believes that 
everything done before television cam- 
eras should be designed specifically 
for the medium. For the TV Amateur 
Hour commercials, therefore. L&M se- 
lected a man who at that time was al- 
read) a rising television personalih 
Dennis James. 

Dennis James is the ingenious voice 
behind the scenes who put bounce into 
Dumont (WABD) wrestling telecasts 
b\ proceeding on the logical assump- 
tion that wrestling is a branch of the 
theatre rather than a pure competitive 
^port. When one wrestler grabbed an- 
other b) the elbow and started twist- 
ing, James would provide the sound 
effects of a bone cracking. When the 
punishment seemed to grow unbear- 
able, James might comment. "Don*! 
worrv mother, he'll he all right." On 
the TV Amateur Hour, the friendh 
and humorous James personalis was 
ideal. 



lit put that personality in the right 
framework, the agenc) devised a Living 
room set complete with an easv chair, 
end table, and book shelf backdrop. 
lame- was to sit in the easv (hair, look 
into the living rooms of viewers, and 
talk direct!) to them about his favorite 
cigarette. The lines written for James 
by cop) chief Keveson would require 
no shouting or orating; the) were 
merely conversation — from one smoker 
to another. 



For change of pace, the I.WI radio 
men wanted an additional commercial 
Format involving Dennis James and 
talent from the show. At first commer- 
cials were tried in which James and 
girl quartets sang the praises ol < 'M 
Golds together. Then the TV art d< 
partmenl struck gold for Old Gold. 
In this case gold was a cigarette park 
that danced. The wav the dancing 
cigarette pack evolved from an idea to 
one of the most effective commercials 



"Lets charter a 
airplane , elmirey ! " 




X essir, our Red River \ alley hay- 
seeds in North Dakota have an Ef- 
fective Buying Income 38.2% above 
the national average! That's why 
they git to live so fancy! 

For 27 years, WDAY has given 
these fabulous farmers hundreds of 
ideas on how to spend their extra 
dough. . . . Latest Hooperatings 
(Dee. *48 — Apr. * 19) prove WDAY 
gets more listeners in every period 
than all other stations combined. 

IN FACT, WDAY HAD THE 
NATION'S HIGHEST SHARE- 
OF-AUDIENCE HOOPERAT- 
INGS — MORNING, AFTER- 
NOON AND NIGHT — FOR 
THOSE FIVE CONSECUTIVE 
MONTHS! 

AND OUR RURAL COVERAGE 
THROUGHOUT THE VALLEY 
IS ONE OF THE SEVEN WON- 
DERS OF RADIO! 

Ask your Free & Peters "Colonel" 

for all the amazing facts, today'. 
You ain't heard nothing, >rt! 




FARGO, N. D. 

NBC 970 KILOCYCLES 
5000 WATTS 



^IfoK&PfcTERS.lK 



> . I...-, N*lU»«l K.| 



2 JANUARY 1950 



41 




Open Letter to 



/ii /nt/<->.j </ /: tfjf/f/fft^/ ar/r<i/<\>i/ny • i<> J )i<±/ 52 .'//u</, Jl'eev %/o*6 /.<> . tPlaga J (i~'J(> 



'//tottM't ^Pu/Ut'ca/tt-n-i ,'Jnr. 



23 December 1949 



Mr. Gordon Gray, President 
All-Radio Presentation, Inc. 
c/o WIP 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dear Gordon: 

Confirming our previous discussions SPONSOR'S 30 January issue will be 100% devoted 
to LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. 

SPONSOR'S job is to provide tools to buyers of broadcast advertising. We consider 
SPONSOR'S Souvenir of LIGHTNING THAT TALKS as a complimentary tool to the most 
important single presentation ever made to them. 

As expressed to you and to other members of your Committee, we are going all out 
to make this Souvenir Edition extraordinarily useful. We won't go into the con- 
tents now (we're keeping that as a surprise) but you have my word that we are aim- 
ing at making this the highlight issue in SPONSOR'S career to date. 

Our two top writers have been detached from normal editorial activity to work 
exclusively on the Souvenir Edition until the job is done. Two other members 
of our editorial staff are assigned under them. Eight important full length 
features linked to LIGHTNING THAT TALKS are now being researched and written. 

In view of the importance of the Souvenir Edition we are doubling our normal press 
run, with the possibility that the final run may go even higher. Our guarantee to 
advertisers is a minimum of 16,000 copies. 

As discussed, we are setting an attractive price for bulk copies so that All-Radio 
Presentation groups throughout the United States can order bulk copies for dis- 
tribution to each person attending the area showings. The cost of 100 copies will 
be $25. If more than 500 copies are ordered the cost reduces to $20 per 100. 

Each copy will be bound with an attractive paper ribbon containing such words as 
"SPONSOR'S Souvenir Edition of the All-Radio Presentation Film 'LIGHTNING THAT 
TALKS ' . " 

I deeply appreciate the enthusiasm with which you and your Committee greeted our 
suggestion to do this kind of job. 



Kindest personal regards. 



Sincerely, 

I form Kjicnn 

President 



Norman R. Glenn/abs 



Gordon Gray 




SOUVENIR EDITION OF 



Lightning 
That Talks 



16,000 GUARANTEE 



REGULAR ADVERTISING RATES APPLY 



ADVERTISING DEADLINE 16 JANUARY 



SPONSOR, 510 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



in T\ reveals how closel) all the mem- 
bers of the radio department work to- 
gether. 

The basic idea was to have a girl 
dressed in a cigarette pack from the 
hips up do a dance routine in front 
of the camera. But how would you 
gel selling punch into this routine'.'' 
Peter Keveson solved this one. He 
~ ingested that the dance music he 
muted sufficientlv so that Dennis James 
could speak through the music and 
make periodic comments tied in with 
the dance yet referring directly to Old 
Golds. Geesely got into the act b\ sug- 
gesting addition of a little dancing 
match box to go with the dancing pack. 
And Larrv Holcomb made still another 
contribution to the development of this 
commercial when he devised a camera 
trick which made the dancing pack ap- 
pear as a tiny image in the corner of 
the screen while Dennis James spoke. 

After the Amateur Hour went on 
AM and TV for Old Gold, Hooper 
ratings and sales results proved that 
it had been a wise choice. The AM 
Vmateux Hour ratings are consistently 
above average, topping many of the 
more expensive shows i 17 November 
network Hooper). The l\ program is 



ninth, with 35.4 and has one of the 
highest sponsor identifiaction ratings 
in the medium (90% at last check I . 
In the October Hooper report the Old 
Gold half of Stop the Music was in 
eighth place with a rating of 37.1, giv- 
ing L&M a perfect score of two out of 
two in the first ten TV programs. And 
Old Gold sales this year are at all- 
time high. 

The AM and TV editions of the 
Amateur Hour are not simulcast. They 
are different shows with talent selec- 
tions which differ widely, depending 
upon visual value of the acts. But a 
common theme helps link them. Each 
week the AM and TV aditions salute 
the same city. The TV show can't travel 
but the AM edition can and does at 
least once every three weeks. Taking 
the show on the road accomplishes sev- 
eral important things: 

1. It helps build the show's local 
audience in the markets visited: 

2. It adds variety to the program 
b) sampling the talent of different 
areas: 

3. It builds good will for Old Gold 
and the Amateur Hour. 

Each out-of-town origination is run 
as a benefit for some local charitv . \ml 



Consumer Market 
data PLUS 



srds < <)\SI MER MARKETS gives ill 
ihe up-to-date figures market and media 
men regularly iim- in "-electing slate. 
county, and cit) markets for consumer 
products. 

\ national advertising manage/ writes: 
"We are using il to la\ out sales quotas 

mil advertising plan-." . . . \n account 
executive writes: "More information 
than I have evei seen in a single mai 
kel data li< ><ik." . . . \ time buyet writes: 

Has figures on farm radio homes and 
markets I have been looking fur for 
years." 

The I'l.l S factor is the Servit e Ids ol 
ii ii. s media > I ik<- the K\ ()( I Servu i 
lit show n here i . The) supplemenl and 

expand local market data with addi 

tional useful information. 

Send for Full Explanation folder de- 
scribing the lull scope ol CONS1 MER 
\1 \RKETS. 



THERE'S ONLY 1 No. 1 MARKET IN OKLAHOMA 

Plus Adjacent Bonus Counties in Kansas. Missouri and Arkansas 

■ cm i ■ h 




MICINT Or FAMILIIS INJOTIMG TtLlfMONI JIIVICI 




STATION KVi 

rrw* *M» t» tart MfiJMfcWiJWl !■' HM 



I hi- i- one ol 258 Service- Ids in the 1949 1950 
CONS! MER M \i;kl fS. 




not a cent of the admission money 
made in this wav goes to pay road ex- 
penses of the show. This has assured 
the Amateur Hour a warm reception 
everywhere it his traveled. 

To build up the local appeal of the 
television show, talent from out of town 
is frequently flown into New ^ ork after 
appearances on the traveling AM show. 
Keessely. who personally supervises 
the AM Amateur Hour for L&M, ac- 
companies it out of town every three 
weeks. This gives him a periodic 
chance to get famliar with conditions 
outside New York City. As he puts it: 
"You can't judge the radio situation 
if all you do is sit around an office 
leading the New Yorker magazine. It's 
astounding how tastes will vary in 
different sections of the country. 

Accounts of how Keesely and his as- 
sociates make basic decisions like those 
required for the Lustre-Creme cam- 
paign and the Amateur Hour tell part 
of the story of how a radio department 
[unctions. But what about ordinary 
dav -to-day activities. What does each 
man in the department do to make the 
wheels go around? 

Keesely. of course, has the executive 
responsibility for the department. All 
important decisions must pass across 
his desk for approval. But, in addi- 
tion, he gets out from behind his desk 
frequently to take an active part in 
production. He's in personal charge 
ol production on the AM Stop the Mil- 
>ic and the \M \mateur Hour, draw- 
ing on his veais of varied radio back- 
ground as a top-flight casting director, 
talent head, and producer to give these 
shows the smoothest polish. Another 
of his important roles is liaison with 
iadio clients. He's the man who irons 
out an) differences of opinion which 
ma) crop up — as the) always do in 
the radio business. He's got a thou- 
sand and one jobs to do involving tal- 
ent, contracts, and relations with net- 
works. 

Keesely's second in command i- 

w\ Holcomb, whose basic respon- 

■ ililics are television production and 

l' e auditioning of talent. Holcomb - 

Hie man who attends all T\ rehearsals 

and whips the commercials into shape. 
lies also the man who sees a constant 
stream of actors, actresses, and net- 
work men with programs to sell. The 
department has an open door and an 
open mind policv . Holcomb will see 
anyone with an idea for a new pro- 
gram. \s he puts it: "There are as 
manv fish in the sea as have been 



44 



SPONSOR 



caught. You can't tell when someone 
with a terrific program idea will walk 
right in the door." 

One of the men Holcomb work most 
closely with i- Clarke Agnew, the T\ 
art director in the department. L&M, 
incidently, was probabl) the first agen- 
CJ to centralize TV art responsibility 
under one man. This was paid off 
nicely. Instead of having all of the 
product art directors try to learn TV 
techniques, one man concentrates on 
the medium till he has the know-how 
land ahilitv to keep costs down) of a 
specialist. 

One of Agnew's most unusual as- 
signments was construction of a set 
of talikng cigarette packages for a 
>pc< ial commercial. He designed and 
built cardboard packs with mouths 
which could be opened and shut by 
hidden strings. He also handles more 
routine problems. For example, when 
still photographs are to be shown on 
the TV screen during a commercial. 
Agnew orders the photographs, makes 
sure it contains the right tone values 
for TV. 

The man who's in charge of all ra- 
dio and TV copy is Peter Keveson. 
He and his assistant, Frank Buck, han- 
dle the entire writing load for the de- 
partment themselves. If necessary. 
they can call on the space copy depart- 
ment for extra writing help, just as 
Clark Agnew can draw on the space 
art department when he needs extra 
assistance. 

On an account like Old Gold where 
the basic theme has been determined, 
kevesons job is to work infinite varia- 
tions on that theme. When the client 
desires something special in cop} treat- 
ment — an emphasis on a Xmas gift 
carton, for example — Keveson gets a 
special request down through the ac- 
count executive. 

Though Frank Daniel's job as time- 
buyer might seem self-explanatory, this 
isn't the case. Everyone knows a time- 
buyer is a man who studies the radio 
needs of a client and the strong points 
of stations in order to make a wise 
purchase of time. But few people know 
what happens after the time has been 
bought. On a spot campaign, for ex- 
ample. Daniel has a continuing flow of 
decisions to make after initial schedul- 
ing is over. Stations are always writ- 
ing in to note that such and such a 
spot was not run at the regularh 
scheduled time and will Daniel accept 
an alternate time. Daniel has to decide 
then whether to take an alternate time 



or a refund. 

Sidney Hertzel, who works as 
Daniel's assistant in a timebuying ca- 
pacity, is also television budgel con- 
trol man. He sees to it that costs for 
props and ait work in T\ shows and 

-minute films do not go beyond the 

alloted figure. Hertzel lias an account- 
ing background, worked bis way up 
through the agencj accounting depart- 
ment. 

Another member of the department 
is Bernard McDermott. the traffic man- 
ager. Essentally, he's the man who 
makes sure that things get where 
they'he going around the department. 
He sends memo- to the cop) writers 
reminding them of commercials due. 
He sees to it that commercials are pul 
into the works on time, the works in- 
cluding a trip to the client for ap- 
1'ioval and submission to the network 
48 hours in advance of broadcasting. 
He also ships recorded commercials 
out all over the country and hunts up 
I \ props. On occasion he's provided 
Frankenstein masks for a Holloween 
commercial, old American engravings, 
a sprig of mistletoe, and a pair of rac- 
soon coats. 

To what extent is all of this aetivitv 
and division of responsibility at LWI 
typical? The members of the depart- 
ment themselves could give you a 
pretty good answer. Several of them 
have worked at one or more agencies 
other than Lennen & Mitchell. And 
all of them are agreed that there's no 
such animal as typical. Hut. whether 
Lennen & Mitchell's radio department 
is "typical" or not, its activities cer- 
tainlv provide a good example of the 
basic techniques and procedures used 
bv am agenc) radio department in 
sending a client's radio dollars where 
they will do the most good. 



FIGURES 
PROVE 



SPONSOR'S 

NEW NEW YORK 
address is 

510 

MADISON 

AVENUE 



W 

T 



R 



F 




AM-FM 

Covers the Prosperous 

Greater Wheeling 

Market From 

BELLAIRE, OHIO 

Consult the Hooper Area Coverage 
Index, 3-County Area 1949, and see 
how well WTRF covers the Wheeling 
(W. Va.) Metropolitan Market. To see 
how economically, 

See THE WALKER CO. Today 



? in RADIO 

s infSlTOO! 

YOU GET THE 
MOST FOR YOUR 
ADVERTISING DOLLARS 

ON 

WOW 

590-5000 WATTS 

WOW-TV 

CHANNEL SIX 
OMAHA, NEBR. 

John J. Gillin, Jr., Pres. & Gen'l Mgr 

John Blair Co. & John Blair TV 
Representatives 



2 JANUARY 1950 



45 




Love is still Box-Office 



"Young Love" is that merry, warm-hearted 
comedy of college-vs. -marriage, with Janet 
Waldo and Jimmy Lydon scoring as a pair 
of star-crossed campus lovers. The hilari- 
ous complications of a secret student 
marriage have kept a big and growing 
audience howling for more. 

Hillhotinl says: "a happy blend of... 
slick production . . . bright scripting." 



Cue says: "fun to listen to." 

Hollywood Variety says: "it's a winner 
. . . the kids can't miss." 

CBS says: you couldn't ask for a nicer 
show to go steady with, than this fast- 
paced, top-comedy CBS Package Program, 
from the able stable that put 
"My Friend Irma"and "Our Miss 
Brooks" in the winner's circle. 



%•!• •••!•# 



A CBS 



PACKAGE 
PROGRAM 












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NO. 8 OF A SERIES 







- 




UNITED STATES 

Relay Racing, - 

WHEC 
In Rochester 



lOHO TIM* 



Ui****" 1 



WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 
Note WHEC's leadership morning, afternoon, evening: 





STATION STATION STATION 


STATION 


STATION 


STATION 




WHEC B C 


D 


E 


F 


MORNING 

8:00-12:00 Noon 
Monday through Fri. 


43.0 15.8 10.1 


4.8 


20.2 


4.4 


AFTERNOON 

12:00-6:00 P.M. 
Monday through Fri. 


34.4 25.6 9.2 


14.4 


9.2 


3.5 

Station 


EVENING 

6:00-10:30 P.M. 
Sunday through Sat. 


37.5 25.5 6.7 
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 


9.1 
HOOPER, 


11.8 
1949 


Broad caiH 

till Sunset 

Only 



latest before doting time. 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 




N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Rtprosontativs: EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc., New York, Chicago, HOMER GRIFFITH CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



2 JANUARY 1950 



51 



JINGLES 

i Continued from page 27 i 

and Chrome-Johnson, erstwhile direc- 
tor of light music for the British 
Broadcasting Corp., mulled over what 
the) didn't like about radio, unani- 
mousl) agreed that it was soap-box 
commercials. The public didn't seem 
to care for them, either. They decided 
to fit commercials to music. After 
some failures they got in touch with 
Edgar Kobak, then with Lord & Thom- 
as, lie saw the possibilities of their 
Pepsi commercial and gave them the 
green light for the now-famous 
Pepsi-Cola hits the spot, 
12-ounce bottle, that's a lot. 
Twice as much joi a nickel, too. 
Pepsi-Cola is the drink for you. 
This jingle, written before extensive 
Mir\e\> on the subject, managed to 
bullseye the majority of "likes" re- 
vealed by the current survey shown 
herein, and completed some 10 years 
later. In five minutes, the pair 
achieved a catchy tune with product- 
name-rcmembrance value, and a sales 
story in the bargain. 

Unlike the Pepsi five-minute miracle, 
these days little is left to happenstance. 



FOR NEW YORK'S 

THIRD GREAT 

MARKET 

ALBANY 

TROY 

SCHENECTADY 

• WROW offers 

• YOU complete 

• COVERAGE and 

• PROMOTION and 

• SERVICE 

5000 Watts • 590 K.C. 

Ask 
THE BOLLINC COMPANY 




BASIC MUTUAL 



Weeks frequent!) are required for an 
analysis of the product's potentialities, 
the exact message it is expected to put 
across, whether it is to he delivered 1>\ 
a soloist or a chorus, the writing of 
the jingle itself. 

If the jingle is to advertise more 
than one product, its adaptability for 
a variety of jobs comes in for a thor- 
ough scrutiny. The choice of a tune, 
too, is subject to plenty of pros and 
cons. Public domain music has the ad- 
vantage of being free for the sponsor, 
and familiar to the listener. Yet, if it's 
too familiar, the listeners may never be 
able to associate it with a candy bar. 
a razor blade, or hair tonic. Or if he 
does, his previous knowledge of its de- 
lav- his new remembrance association. 
Conversely, it may require a time lapse 
for a new tune to catch on. It's a moot 
question, but most agency executives 
agree a good rule of thumb, in the 
realm of public domain, is to select a 
tune which strikes a familiar chord in 
the listener's memory, but doesn't 
bring on recollections of a Christmas 
with Grandma. 

To demonstrate the extreme versa- 
tility of singing commercials, SPONSOR 
has analyzed a number of randomly- 
selected network, spot and local shows 
which have won listeners' approval 
and have increased sales. 

Chase & Sanborn's new jingle for 
Instant Coffee thrives on humor: 

For better tasting Instant Coffee, 

Look for Chase & Sanborn on the 
lid. 

For what Mr. Chase didn't know 
about coffee. 

Mr. Sanborn did. 

So sold on singing commercials is 
huge Standard Brands, which used to 
sponsor such lavish programs as Major 
Bowes, Edgar Bergen & Charlie Mc- 
Carthy, Eddie Cantor and One Man's 
Family, that a year ago it shifted to 
spot broadcasting exclusively, and uses 
jingles for Royal gelatin. Royal pud- 
ding. Blue Bonnet oleomargarine and 
( lhase & Sanborn coffee. 

Several months ago, Bristol-Myers 
started a spot campaign for Vitalis. 
According l<> its agency. Doherly. 
Clifford X Shenfield, "we decided on 
jingles because we fell that to get 
a< ross to men the importance of look- 
ing well-groomed and attractive, we 
needed an approach which would be 
entertaining, and still have an emo- 
tional appeal."' The theme, "Every 
Jane and Judy and Alice, goes for gu\- 
who use \ [talis," sung b\ a mixed 
quartet, subtl) sets up a sex angle not 



onlj through the words, hut bj having 
the female voices come out strong at 
psychological moments. 

The Vitalis jingles were spotted in 
as many participating programs as 
possible to take advantage of an al- 
ready conditioned audience. The cam- 
paign started on 40 stations. Each lo- 
cal \1.C. was supplied with the tran- 
scribed 30-second jingle, plus straight 
accompanying copj . 

Pleased enough with results to up 
the station total to 60 (and contem- 
plating more in the near future) 
Doberty, Clifford Ji. Shenfield is still 
experiment-minded. \\ ithin the past 
several weeks it made up. and is cur- 
rent!) using, a 55-second transcription 
which starts with the jingle, goes into 
brief copy, and ends with the jingle. 
The initial five seconds are devoted to 
lead-in copy by the announcer, who is 
supplied with a number of suggested 
lines so he may select the one best suit- 
ed to his personality and style. 

The singing-talking commercial tech- 
nique, which won audience approval in 
the survey shown on these pages, is 
represented in the majority of the ex- 
amples discussed here. By sandwich- 
ing the sales talk between jingles, the 
advertiser loses little of his listeners' 
interest and good will, gets his mes- 
sage across, still remains part of the 
program. 

Exponents of the boy-girl technique 
are Lanny and Ginger Grey, who have 
been jingling (as composers, lyricists 
and talent) since 1939 for such di- 
verse products as razor blades, depart- 
ment stores, hats, cold remedies, tea. 
noodle soup. "We've written and sung 
more commercials for more accounts 
than we can remember," says Mr. 
Grey, "but there's one thing we never 
forget. Inevitably, one phrase of a jin- 
gle remains in the listener's memory, 
just as in a popular song. We make 
certain that phrase contains the name 
of the sponsor. And when people say 
some products don't lend themselves 
to jingles, we can't go along. 

A top Grey account is the Sattler De- 
partment Store in Buffalo. The) hadn't 
been able to lick their advertising prob- 
lem via printed media. Consisting of a 
motley collection of small adjacent 
stores as the firm expanded, it had 
never been able to attract customers 
from the wealthy side of the tracks. In 
1941, Lanny and Ginger went to work 
for Sattler over several Buffalo sta- 
tions with a catch \ jingle that ended 
with the recommendation: "go to 998 
Broadwa) . . . today." 'The latter de- 



52 



SPONSOR 



livered in Ginger's softest tones.) 

After a year, Sattler's thought the 
public was tired of the jingle, rated a 
change. They thought wrong. \!ter a 
brief interlude during which the duo 
sang ;m assigned jingle, public opinion 
brought the old favorite hack. In four 
years, bitching 12 basic verses to the 
familiar tune, it brought Sattler's dol- 
lar volume from third to first plaec in 
the Buffalo area. Today the clientele 
buys mink coats along with bargain 
basement items. 

In 1948. Sattler's moved into their 
new store, complete with air condition- 
ing and the only escalator in Buffalo. 
The store management credits its radio 
advertising with making the expan- 
sion possible, calls Sattler's "the store 
that jingles built." Lanny and Ginger 
are currently aired 102 times weekh 
over WBNY, WEBR, WGR. WKBW 
and WBEN. 

Until this past summer, Rhcingolrl 
Brewing Company used radio only on 
a sporadic schedule to plug such events 
as its Miss Rheingold contest. At tin 
end of the prolonged New York beer 
truck drivers strike last June. the v 
needed a major advertising push to 
remind consumers the drought wa s 
over and get them to thinking pleas- 
antly in terms of their product. Asreno 
Foote. Cone & Beldina created a jingle 
"My beer is Rheinsrold. the drv beer.' 
a tune with an infectious swing. This 
was aired in New York bv Rheingold 
and throughout New Enarland. New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania and Virginia for 
local airings via transcription bv 
Rheimrold distributors. 

Philip Liebmann. Rheingold's vice- 
president and ad manacer, is so im- 
pressed bv the job done bv jinsles for 
a specific purpose that the radio cam- 
paign now being planned will depend 
on them 100 per cent. During 1950. 
for the first time in the company's 
long history, radio and TV will be 
used on a weekly schedule. 

Another beer concern which has 
chalked up singular success with sing- 
ing commercials is the Red Top Brew- 
ing Company. Jingles have plugged 
Red Top beer and ale for 12 years. 
Barbarossa beer for 10 years. Chains 
breaks and spot programs have ap- 
peared on more than 225 stations in 
150 markets located in 21 states, and 
it is estimated that more than 58.000 
singing commercials are broadcast 
each year, well supported by newspa- 
pers, posters, window steramers. and 
promotional letters. Large segments of 
the population can recite "All I hear 



is Red Top Beer," "Every sale is Red 
Top Ale," and "All I know, suh, is 
Barbarossa.'' 

The American Chicle Co. has devel- 
oped its own distinctive form of sing- 
ing commercials over a 10-vear period. 
Its lyric style is so linked with the 
sponsor that imitators run the risk of 
giving a free plug to Adams Clove, 
Beeman's Pepsin. Chiclets, Dentyne, 
Black Jack, Sen-Sen or Wild Cherry 
chewing gum. Here's an example: 
Solo: You re all invited to the 

Dentyne quiz, 
Do you know how good this 

chewing gum is? 



Voice: Lasting flavor? 
Solo: You re not missin ! 
Voice: So delu ious — 
Solo: Right! Now listen — 

Chew some Dentyne (>um 

each day, 
Helps keep teeth white — 
breath okay! 
Some years back, American Chicle 
occasionally tested its singing commer- 
cials against news and musical pro- 
grams of all kinds. Once they had 
their answer, the company devotes its 
entire radio budget to selling via jin- 
gles. The 1949 budget was bigger than 
ever before: indications are it will be 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S fllOHee* RADIO STATION 



Them that Aai. . . . 



gits; 



There's an extra punch in your 
advertising dollar on WDBJ! 
To demonstrate, look at these 
Promotion figures for the Fall 
Campaign (Aug. 21-Nov. 21): 

Newspaper Ad Lineage 19,617 

Newspaper Publicity Lineage 2,160 

Spot Announcements 525 

"Biggest Show" Spots 

(Daily Feature, 8:45-9:00 AM) 624 

Downtown Display Windows . 11 

plus trailers, dealer cards and letters'. 



WDBJ's potential audience is over a million 
people who spend almost a billion dollars yearly. 




2 JANUARY 1950 



53 



upped in 1950. 

The Chateau Martin Wine Co. de- 
rided on a single identifying jingle 
personality when it launched its radio 
campaign in 1935. When ''Gaston," 
the suave, sophisticated Frenchman 
was introduced to listeners, Chateau 
Martin was selling 15.000.000 bottles 
of wine yearly. Today, with an annual 
ad budget of $250,000 (of which two- 
thirds is devoted to radio i. the corn- 
pan) sells about 45.000,000 bottles 
yearly. Chateau Martin's general sales 
manager, Maurice Greenberg, attrib- 
utes the marked increase to "Gaston," 
who additionally appears in all the 
company's newspaper and billboard 
advertising. 

P & G's Duz is an apt example of 
the painstaking lengths to which jin- 
gle-users go to make the commercial 
do a dual job, fit the product to a "t", 
be human and interesting. The Duz 
song came into being four years ago 
through an effort to harness the "Duz 
does everything" slogan to the rhyth- 
mic, sudsy "slosh-slosh" of a washing 
machine in use. 



DRUMMING 
UP BUSINESS 

IN 
PETROLEUM 



(Ky.)? 



!,„„,„.»«, ■", ricl , io 
»|| vna need l<> •" , r ,„pMOU» 

ino »«•• "*::,ia from ""» 
»»'' S" ,', e r are. every >'■'• 

oftheSutel ,,„»r 

II ml that's i"* 1 " 




Compton Advertising tried 38 ex- 
periments involving different depths of 
water, quantity of suds, and size of 
clothes loads before the effect was ob- 
tained, and the four-line "Samba" ver- 
sion created. As soon as it was put on 
its nighttime program i "Truth or Con- 
sequences") and its current daytime 
network serial I "Guiding Light"), 
brand identification shot up. More 
important was an "extremely notice- 
able sales increase which has held up 
steadily." 

Educated originators and sponsors 
of jingles agree that they must not ir- 
ritate the listener. On that premise, 
Sachs Quality Furniture has been 
breaking all the rules — unless you ex- 
amine the switch used, and the rules 
themselves. 

The company sponsored its first 
radio program in 1925, a musical 
broadcast built around the Three Lit- 
tle Sachs trio which ran for 6,300 con- 
secutive performances. Shortly after 
the show started, the company devel- 
oped the idea of jingles to supplement 
its regular radio advertising. These 
commercials stressed (as they still do) 
the store phone number. Newspaper 
ads prominently displayed the number. 

To increase business for its slip- 
cover department. Sachs conceived a 
take-off on the crab hawker in Porgy 
and Bess. In the jingle the actor shouts 
"I'm tawhin' about Sachs, Vm lawkin 
about Sachs." But here's the switch in 
the rule: After irritating the audience 
beyond mortal forebearance, the com- 
pany is smart enough to capitalize on 
the reaction. The jingle is interrupted 
b) machine gun fire followed by: "We 
shot him and we're glad. We're the 
Three Little Sachs, and he's been driv- 
ing us crazy, too. Come to think of it. 
Sachs Qualit) slip covers are something 
to shout about." etc. 

Ergo, listener and the Three Little 
Sachs are brought together in mutual 
understanding, and a chuckle, and 
Sachs slip-cover department is doing 
more than $1,000,000 business an- 
nually . 

Most successful of the jingles is 
"Chitquita Banana." I nited Fruit 
bonanza which is equally successful in 
selling bananas, instructing listeners 
in their care and preparation, and in 
lending a hand I" starving kids abroad. 
I F's entire spot campaign on occasion 
has sold nothing but good-will, relief 
from famine. \> this was being writ- 
icn. Chiquita was worried about the 
New York water shortage. So I F was 
recording a new verse along these 



lines: "Here's Chiquita to say some- 
thing we should remember each day. 
Our H 2 supply is getting very low. 
Don't use water, unless you think you 
oughter." 

Possessed of a very definite person- 
ality, sense of humor, and philosophy, 
Chiquita is a reflection of United 
bruit's thinking as exemplified 1>\ 
Partridge, who has been with the firm 
nearly 35 years. "I'm having so much 
fun with Chiquita Banana," he says, 
"that if I had an independent income, 
I'd do this job for the sheer love of it. 
We aren't just trying to sell bananas 
in place of some other fruit; we're 
trying to do a job for the entire fruit 
industry." 

Thus, Chiquita often sings about her 
new bean, "Johnny Apple." plugs Kel- 
logg's Corn Flakes as a wonderful com- 
bination with bananas. And no one 
laughs harder than United Fruit at 
Chitquita's cartoon appearances, and 
the numerous lampooning versions of 
the jingle. 

Written by Garth Montgomery, lyr- 
icist, and Len MacKenzie. composer, 
in 1944 the sponsor and agency imme- 
diately went overboard for it. It took 
six months for the public to follow 
suit, but when it did. the attachment 
became ardent and lasting. The jingle 
has been played by the Boston Sym- 
phony, commented on by Time maga- 
zine, and featured in a sermon at the 
Euclid Avenue Baptist Church. As a 
technicolor 80-second film, it has been 
shown in nearb 100 motion picture 
bouses, many of which would never be- 
fore accept a commercial film. Recent- 
ly, it made its T\ debut — an event of 
such proportions, and one requiring 
such an unusual omount of previous 
groundwork that it will be dealt with 
in detail in the second part of this ar- 
ticle, devoted to singing commercials 
on video. 

The history of "Chiquita Banana" 
is so replete with production problems 
and their solution, with the concep- 
tion and workings of a highlj inte- 
grated advertising philosophy, with 
human-interest value closeb paralleled 
b\ fundamental working value, that it 
will be the subject of an entire SPONSOR 
article in a forthcoming issue. * * * 



510 MADISON AVE. 



Is SPONSOR'S New Address 



SPONSOR 



RAILROADS 

{Continued from page 31) 

week series of Burton Holmes film 
travelogs on three video stations. The 
Milwaukee Road, however, regards its 
eight-year sponsorship of 15-minute 
newscasts over some 25 on-line sta- 
tions in the Northwest, as a basic part 
of its advertising program. 

A recent convert to broadcasting is 
the Lackawanna which on 15 Novem- 
ber began a schedule of one-minute 
musical announcements in 20 on-line 
cities to help introduce the new stream- 
lined train "Phoebe Snow." J. Hamp- 
ton Baumgartner, public relations man- 
ager, said: "While this is our initial 
venture into radio, we regard it as a 
primary part of our advertising pro- 
motion in support of the "Phoebe 
Snow." In all probability we shall con- 
tinue to use radio after this special 
campaign has been concluded." 

Among consistent sponsors of news- 
casts are the Chicago & North Western 
and then Denver & Rio Grande. Both 
radio and television are major factors 
in Boston & Maine advertising. 

On the other hand, although ;'ie 
Chesapeake & Ohio was a regional 
sponsor of Information Please on Mu- 
tual from 26 September, 1947. to 25 
June. 946 (when Robert R. Young was 
stirring up public opinion to influence 
the Interstate Commerce Commission 
in letting him exercise his "working 
control" of the New York Central), 
it has done no air advertising since. 
In fact, C&O's entire advertising pro- 
gram has been sharply reduced this 
year. 

The biggest share of the cost of The 
Railroad Hour falls on such leading 
roads as the Pennsy, New York Cen- 
tral. Union Pacific, Santa Fe and 
Southern Pacific. But even including 
them the average cost for all 134 roads 
is only $7,463 a year or $146 a broad- 
cast — which is certainly less than any 
of them pay to print timetables. 

Featuring Cordon MacRae, baritone. 
and a different female star each week, 
the series consists of a streamlined ver- 
sion of operettas and musical comedies 
with well known guest singers. 

The AAR and its members promote 
the program in various media — includ- 
ing car cards, dining car menus, pos- 
ters, envelope stuffers. tag lines in AAR 
magazine advertising, employee maga- 
zine features and ads. timetables, and 
announcements on terminal public ad- 
dress systems. 



Of the four consecutive shows on 
the NBC "Monday night of music," 
the latest Hooperatings give Railroad 
Hour 9.6, as against 8.1 for Voice of 
Firestone, 6.3 for The Telephone Hour 
and 5.0 for the Cities Service Band of 
America. 

To learn what type of listeners the 
show was attracting, AAR last March 
I when it was on ABC) offered a 64- 
page question-and-answer booklet 
about railroads, entitled "Quiz." It 
brought 37,753 requests. Subsequently, 
repeated briefly at the end of seven 
broadcasts, the number rose to 49,383. 

Analyzing the response, the AAR 



found that, although no comment was 
requested, 7,241 wrote favorably of 
The Railroad Hour. There was onlv 
one unfavorable comment. Sixty-four 
per cent of those who replied were 
men, 25 per cent women, 8 per cent 
children, and the rest not identifiable. 

The Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul 
& Pacific, better known as "the Mil- 
waukee Road." has long used radio as 
a basic part of its advertising program, 
reports C. C. Dilley of Chicago, adver- 
tising agent (manager). 

"Our earliest exeperience was with 
live and recorded one-minute announce- 
ment," he said, "but for the past eight 



IH 



IT TAKES WBNS TO RING CASH 
REGISTERS IN CENTRAL OHIO— 

In and around Columbus in central Ohio are 163,550 families 
who loyally keep their radios tuned to WBNS day and night. 
They have learned by a quarter of a century of listening that 
they can believe what they hear on WBNS. This market is not 
only thoroughly covered by WBNS but there is the extra bonus 
of program duplication on the affiliated FM station WELD. That's 
why advertisers who wish to do a complete and profitable selling 
|ob in central Ohio naturally select WBNS as their principal 
radio medium. WBNS has a long list of both local and national 
advertisers who consistently broadcast their sales messages over 
this station for year after year to the tune of sweet music on 
the cash registers. 

ASK THE LOCAL ADVERTISERS 
ABOUT WBNS . . . THEY KNOW— 

The local merchants know from experience what radio station 
pulls returns and which one does not. They get together. . 
They compare notes. ... So ask Roger Jewelers, Carlile Furni- 
ture, Hanna Paint, Capital City Products Company, Reubens 
and dozens of others here in Columbus. Many of them will tell 
you that they have been using WBNS for twenty-five years and 
each one will testify that this station always brings in the cus- 
tomers and does the job at low cost too. 

YES, AND ALSO ASK THE NATIONAL 
ADVERTISER ABOUT WBNS — 

National advertisers do not spend their money wildly. They test 
and retest before embarking upon a campaign. . . . And here in 
Central Ohio the field tests supported by Hooperatings prove 
that WBNS has the audience which does the buying. That's why 

more national advertisers use WBNS than 

any other Columbus station. 



COVERS 
tY4 TRAL OH} C 



IN COLUMBUS, OHIO IT'S 



T~T 



POWER 5000 D.1000.N CBS 



ASK JOHN BLAIR 



2 JANUARY 1950 



55 



years our major use of radio has been 
15-minute newscasts on on-line sta- 
tions" — currently 25 of them. Com- 
mercials are devoted primarily to train 
service, such as the "Hiawathas." But 
some are institutional: some promote 
lesser-known departments of the rail- 
road, such as the agricultural, mineral 
and industrial departments. Others dis- 
cuss freight service, or tax problems: 
special trains and conducted tours, or 
new stations or other local improve- 
ments. 

"Our radio advertising, except for 
a series of announcements in Alaska." 
Mr. Dilley explained, "is on a once-a- 
week, year 'round basis, with the day 
and time chosen to reach an audience 
of both men and women." Other adver- 
tising is used to support radio pro- 
grams only when the railroad changes 
stations or newscasters. 

Although the Southern Pacific has 
had considerable experience with ra- 
dio, it has done "very little" with it in 
recent years, replied Fred Q. Tredway 
of San Francisco, general advertising 
manager. 

"Before the war for several years 
we put on several types of programs, 
— dramatic and then audience partici- 



FIRST 
AGAIN! 



Sunday afternoon tele- 
vision programming has 
been started by KDYL- 
TV, marking another 
"first" for Salt Lake 
City's first television 
station. 

In 1950 — to tap the 
rich Salt Lake City 
market — remember 
these powerful selling 
twins, KDYL and 
KDYL-TV, always out 
in front. 




Salt Lake City. Utah 
National Representative: John Blair & Co. 



pation — in Los Angeles, "getting SP 
executives there were pleased with the 
programs and "felt they were helpful 
in a promotional way, although we 
could not get any definite indication 
in dollars and cents." A high propor- 
tion of SP passengers had heard them. 
During the war the railroad spon- 
sored a half-hour dramatic program 
over Mutual — Don Lee to recruit la- 
bor. Hooperatings ranged from 5 to 9. 
For a year after the war's endn the 
SP continued to sponsor the show, for 
traffic promotion. 

"Although we had a very good au- 
dience" throughout the entire period," 
Mr. Tredway pointed out, "we got very 
little reaction in definite sales or from 
offers of booklets or similar material. 
. . . We regard radio as a good back- 
ground medium for our other adver- 
tising. . . . We feel that spot radio is 
the most effective for our purpose, and 
particularly good when anouncing a 
new service, a new train, etc." He ad- 
mitted, however, that as "sporadic 
user," the SP has had trouble in get- 
ting good announcements. 

The company's radio programs have 
been promoted in newspaper, outdoor 
poster, window display advertising and 
newspaper publicity. 

A more consistent announcement is 
the New York Central, which has used 
one-minute radio announcements for 
three years. About 15 announcements 
are scheduled weekly in Boston, Chi- 
cago, Cincinnati. Indianapolis, St. 
Louis, Springfield. Mass., and Wor- 
cester. 

The announcer devotes about 15 sec- 
onds to straight weather reports prior 
to the commercial, the bridge into 
which is: "But it's always fair weather 
on the 'Mercury' and 'Twilight' ' — or 
the "Southwestern Limited," or some 
other train. The announcements also 
have been used for all-expense tours 
and excursions. 

The Central's broadcast efforts, said 
Harry W. Frier, account executive 
at Foote, Cone & Belding, New York, 
are "100 per cent passenger traffic and 
not 'institutional'.'' Broadcasting is re- 
garded as an "essential" but "not nee 
essarily a primary part " of the adver- 
tising program. \imouncements arc 
employed because the} provide "flex- 
ibility in localizing our message. 

Since last April the New York Cen- 
tral has sponsored a series of six one- 
minute filmed television announce- 
ments a week on New ^ ork City sta- 
tions. Nine different ones feature 



trains, coach service, overnight service, 
resorts. 

The railroad considers the TV effort 
as "experimental. It is virtually impos- 
sible to trace any direct results to it." 
The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 
uses announcements "occasionally." re- 
ported A. A. Dailey. Chicago, general 
advertising manager. "Those occasions 
are when we want to put some extra 
promotion behind some of our service 
in a particular community where sales 
are dropping off." The announcements 
are broadcast several times daily for 
two or three weeks. "So far this year 
we have used spots in three different 
areas." Usually these are scheduled in 
conjunction with newspapers — "and 
the combination usually helps boost 
sales." He could not say which of the 
two media does the better job. 

The Denver & Rio Grande Western 
sponsors a morning newscast in Den- 
ver, an evening one in Salt Lake City. 
Both are three times a week. In addi- 
tion, during the skiing season, the 
D&RGW uses announcements on disk 
jockey shows, to attract teenagers, 
and on evening news shows, to reach 
adults. Ninety-five per cent of the 
commercials, said Malcolm T. Sills of 
Axelsen Advertising Agency, "pro- 
mote specific passenger trains and 
special excursions. 3 per cent are in- 
stitutional, and 2 per cent promote 
freight business. The R&RGW devotes 
about 5 per cent of its annual budget 
to radio. It promotes the radio pro- 
grams in window displays and in 
footnotes on outdoor advertisements. 
Ski special commercials, are re- 
sponsible for the majority of ski-train 
sales. The road could not measure 
accurately- the response to newscasl 
commercials, "but comments to ticket 
agents and officials indicate that they 
are effective." 

The Chicago & North Western re- 
ports onlv one broadcast program, 
the "400" Hour, an early-morning 
newscast over WGN, Chicago. The 
railroad, however, has sponsored it 
for more than 10 years — which may 
be a record for railroad consistency 
on the air. Several years ago, when 
the C&NW announced its intention of 
discontinuing the -how. so many lis- 
teners complained that it was con- 
tinued. 

"Radio has always been closely 
linked with the Boston & Maine in its 
advertising schedules," replied George 
II. Mill of Boston, publicity manager. 
"The B&M was one of the first roads 



56 



SPONSOR 



to use radio for public relations. The 
jingle "Timetable Mable" was com- 
mercially scheduled more than 500 
times, and became so popular that it 
was printed in sheet music, chosen by 
listeners as one of the most pleasing 
radio commercials." 

The B&M has now jumped into 
television. On 30 December, 1948, it 
started the Boston & Maine Winter 
Sports Special. Featured each week a 
different on-line sports area and a talk 
by a representative of that area. The 
stage set was the interior of a ski 
lodge. After the talk, a 150-foot film 
showed the area and skiing conditions. 

Its next TV venture was the Boston 
& Maine Railroad Show. On-the-spot 
films featured different railroad opera- 
tions, and an official discussed them. 
During this 10-week series viewers 
"rode" the cab of the "Kennebec" ex- 
press from Boston to Portland. An 
offer of a set of photographs of this 
run, made on two shows, brought in 
1,500 requests. 

Last fall the B&M went into TV 
again with a 13-week series featuring 
New England cartoonist Francis Dahl. 
known for his good-natured ribbing 
of Bostonians. A Dahl family romps 
through situations in B&M cars. Com- 
mercials are Dahl cartoons. 

Since Earnest Elmo Calkins wrote 
the first "Phoebe Snow" jingles for 
newspaper ads, 40 years ago, the Dela- 
ware, Lackawanna & Western has been 
jingle-conscious. But it did not put 
jingles on the air — in fact it didn't 
get on the air at all — until the new de 
luxe "Phoebe Snow" began the New 
York-Buffalo run on 15 November, 
1949. 

Then a series of three to six sing- 
ing commercials a week, scheduled for 
13 weeks, proclaimed: 
"The new 'Phoebe Snow' 

The streamliner queen. 
The neiv 'Phoebe Snow' 

It rides like a dream, 
Oh the new 'Phoebe Snow' 

Is stealin the show 
The fastest, safest, smoothest ridin 

Way to go! 
"Deep-cushioned seats 

A wide-window view . . . 
A roomy Lounge-Car 

Just waitin for you. 
The food is divine 

And you'll be on time, 
So go Lackawanna 

On the 'Phoebe Snow' 
New York to Buffalo — 'Phoebe 
Snow!" 



TV SURVEY 

(Continued from page 33 I 

rodeo from Madison Square Garden. 
The World Series broadcasts came dur- 
ing the month covered by the survey 
reported here. 

Gillette commercials include both 
live comments by announcers and film 
spots with a demonstration of some 
kind. Philip Morris offers their com- 
mercial via CBS-TV's Candid Camera 
(Monday 9-9:30 p.m.) and Ruthie on 
the Telephone (every night except 



Wednesday and Sunday, 7:55-8), and 
ten filmed spots weekly on WABD and 
WNBT. 

Chesterfield commercials presented 
via Arthur Godfrey and His Friends 
(CBS-TV) and Chesterfield Supper 
Club (NBC-TV) not only had a good 
liking score in this survey, as they did 
in the Starch report for the same pe- 
riod, but weren't far behind the Old 
Gold pitches in winning new users. 
The question of how long such new 
users remain "loyal" to the brand i-. 
of course, a subect for further inves- 
tigation. 



q 






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^ **—«•* ;;;■' '■■« 



BROADCAST MUSIC,INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



2 JANUARY 1950 



It is obvious that other factors are 
at work besides liking or distliking a 
commercial to account for its power 
to move products. Otherwise the buy- 
ing curve would closely parallel the 
attitude curve. Another important fac- 
tor is the memory value of the com- 
mercial. No attempt was made by this 
survey to check this factor. But the 
Starch studies reveal that high memory 
value of a commercial does not nec- 
essarily coincide with either liking or 
the "brand aeeptance" of a product. 

In Starch's terminology, "brand ac- 
ceptance" refers to a person's attitude 
toward buying a product. It is ascer- 
tained by querying a sample of both 
viewers and non-viewers as to which 
of several brands they would purchase 
if they were going to buy. The differ- 
ence (if any) between the preferences 
of viewers and non-viewers represents 
the "brand acceptance" figure. 

An ingredient even more important 
in a commercial than liking and mem- 
ory value is its believability. Format, 
content, presentation of a commercial 
may be pleasing to a subject, even 
though he disbelieves or doubts the 
truth of specific statements or claims. 

A commercial may be entertaining 
— or not — and this will strongly af- 
fect its like or dislike rating. This is 
naturally important in so far as the 
entertainment value may be important 
in getting and holding attention. The 
results of this survey, as has been in- 
dicated, reveal that well-liked commer- 
cials aren't necessarily good sales 
tools. 

Action-getting components oi a com- 
mercial were studied comprehensive!) 
in the last war by Capt. Horace 
Schwerin for the U. S. Government in 
the interest of its conservation pro- 
gram. 

Schwerin (now head of the qualita- 
tive research firm bearing his name) 
and his associates discovered thai be- 
lievability, along with memory value 
and likability were most important in 
moving people to action with a sales 
argument. Believabilitv turned out to 
be most important of the three. These 
elements are expedient checking points 
for commercial effectiveness in lien <d 
shadowing prospects to see what the) 
do after being exposed to a -ales talk. 

Nobody shadoweil members of the 
TV Critics Club, who took enthusias- 
ts advantage of their chance to talk 
about TV programs and give othei in- 
formation. Bui the \ineiican Man- 
agement Counsel did the next besl 



thing. They asked viewers what prod- 
ucts they had actually purchased as a 
result of watching television. 

Food products accounted for $9.1% 
of all products first purchased be- 
cause of TV. Lipton products, plugged 
by Arthur Godfrey on Talent Scouts 
(SBS-TV), alone accounted for 31.9% 
of all new brand purchases in the food 
category. 

Godfrey's commercials are general- 
ly conceded by the public and the 
trade to be both entertaining and 
credible. This latter quality, of course, 
springs largely from the effect of sin- 
cerity possessed by Godfrey in so re- 
markable a degree. The fact that to 
most Godfrey listeners his commercials 
are entertaining also shows up in the 
high liking score seen in the table ac- 
companying this article. 

Kraft products were second to Lip- 
ton with 10.9%. They are plugged on 
the NBC Television Theater. Except 
for Hi-V orange juice with 5.2% and 
Borden products with 4.9%, ten other 
products named had under 3.0% of all 
those whom television influenced to 
buy new food brands. 

Texaco products, plugged on the 
Milton Berle show by the famous Tex- 
aco products, plugged on the Milton 
Berle show by the famous Texaco 
pitchman, accounted for 51.6% of 
auto accessories purchases: Auto-Lite 
garnered 27.4%. 

The table of likes and dislikes 
shown at the head of this article was 
limited arbitrarily to those commer- 
cials mentioned a minimum of by 35 
respondents. Most disliked of all com- 
mercials in that table were those of 
\\ helan Drug Co., on DuMont's Satur- 
day night Cavalcade of Stars. 

Main reason given was that com- 
mercials interrupt the show too fre- 
quently. These commercials are filmed. 
Another gripe was the manner in which 
the camera picked up the m.c. right 
in the middle of some business being 
enjoved bv the studio audience. View- 
ers feel they're missing something. 

Despite the fact that 89 out of 92 
viewers disliked the Whelan commer- 
cials, one of their advertised products 
ranked fourth on the list of products 
in all categories first bought because 
of TV influence. The item is Heed, a 
deodorant. It was outranked onlv bv 

Tide and I .iplon prodw ts 

Several exceptionallv well-liked com- 
mercials • mile chart heading this 
slorv I did not influence enough of 
the sample Men or morel to make the 



list of those products purchased by 
members of the Critics Club sample 
for the first time. This list was pub- 
lished in part one of this series. 

Among these brands are Chiclets, 
BVD. Ballantine and Speidel. The 
selling has to appear credible in or- 
der to get action. Nobody yet has 
been able to lay down specific rules 
for achieving this precious quality. 
Each product and situation seems to 
require highly individual treatment. 
Schwerin Research Corp., as well as 
the research departments of McCann- 
Ericksen and other agencies, has done 
work in this field. 

It will be noted that Gillette com- 
mercials are disliked more than liked, 
yet they were highly effective in com- 
petition with competitive commercials, 
moving 75.0% of those who said shav- 
ing accessories commercials influenced 
them to buy. 

In most product categories, one 
brand strongly dominated all others in 
the sample's report on commercials 
that made them first try the product. 
It is also interesting to note that the 
Starch "brand acceptance" for prod- 
ucts common to both lists (tested dur- 
ing the same period) finds most prod- 
ucts in the same relative rank as they 
appear on the TV Critics Club report. 

Among hair preparations Wildroot 
led with 48.1 c '(. Vaseline was second 
in the group of seven with 22.2%. 
Colgate topped tooth pastes with 
37.4%. 

Next to Tide's overwhelming 76.2% 
came Ivory with only 8.4%. Among 
coffees Sanka dominated in similar 
fashion with 80.0'V to its nearest com- 
petitor. Maxwell House (both Gen- 
eral Food products) with 10.0%. 

While Candies were closer bunched. 
Nestle's with 33.3% was exactly three 
times stronger than its nearest rivals. 
Mason. Musketeer, and Bonom's, each 
with 11.1%. 

Among eight beers, Ballantine led 
the parade with 43.5% to Schaefer's 
30.0% and Rheingold's 10.0%. 

General Electric appliances, with 
24.2 r ( cxactlv doubled Westinghouse 
with 12.1 '< . These percentages are all 
based upon the total number of re- 
spondents who bought in a specific 
product group as a result of TV com- 
mercials. 

The unusual dominance of a single" 
brand in so many product categories 
calls for careful analysis to discover 
what relevant factors weigh most heav- 
ilv in this result. It seems clear that 



58 



SPONSOR 



much more work needs to be done on 
the factors that make a commercial 
credible. If the viewers believe the 
advertising claims advanced on tele- 
vision — it may not be so important 
whether the commercial is entertain- 



ing. 



* • • 



GREATER LOUISVILLE 

{Continued from page 29) 

The Greater Louisville Association 
started advertising almost as soon as 
they set up their adding machines. 
Even in the earliest days of the com- 
pany Flexner believed in it strongly. 
"If we are consistent in the things we 
stand for and offer, the citizens of this 
area will benefit by taking advantage 
of them. But we must get the word to 
them." 

The Association first took its story 
to potential customers through the 
newspapers. And they used them con- 
sistently. Although newspapers have 
to share 25% of the company's adver- 
tising budget with bus cards, there has 
been a Greater Louisville ad in The 
Courier Journal and The Louisville 
Times every day for the past 25 years. 
But almost as soon as radio made an 
appearance, the Association turned to 
it as a way to sell goods. 

"I remember that I was interested in 
radio even back in the days when I 
used to listen to my crystal set — giving 
out mostly noise with, once in a while. 
a faint voice or a little music. But as 
reception improved, I began to think 
thta may be others with radio sets were 
just as much interested as I. I thought 
that if I could explain to these people 
what our association offered in the way 
of safe investment of their money, and 
an economical home loan, that I could 
do a real selling job for our organiza- 
tion." 

Flexner suited the action to the 
words and the Association went on the 
air for the first time on New Year's 
Eve, 1925 — with a full-length presen- 
tation of the opera Faust. The pro- 
gram took two hours and was the first 
opera heard over the air in Louisville. 
Although Greater Louisville added oth- 
er programs shortly afterward, it main- 
tained the two-hour monthly show for 
several years. 

2 JANUARY 1950 



Even in those earl\ da\s. Flexner 
was sure of his medium. "There was 
a good deal of trial and error. We had 
to learn by experience what would 
click and what would not. Much of 
the criticism we received would have 
made an advertiser give it up as a bad 
job — the imitations snakes we used to 
get through the mail, for instance. But 
what kept us on the air trying to sell 
our wares, was the fact that our busi- 
ness was increasing by the day, and 
so many of our customers mentioned 
the fact that they had heard about us 
on the radio. I knew I had found a 
medium that would get the story of our 
institution into every nook and cor- 
ner." 

By 1927, after two years of radio. 
the company had $3,000,000 in re- 
sources. It moved into larger quarters 
and. when radio itself was only a few 
years old, set up its own broadcasting 
studio in the new building. In that 
year too, they started the collection of 
a music librarv and added the half- 
hour children's show to their schedule. 

In their years of radio advertising, 
Greater Louisville has adapted its com- 



mercials to changing times and their 
own problems. During the 1937 flood, 
the company continued its broadcasts 
on batteries, and eliminated all the 
commercials from its programs. In- 
stead of commercials, Flexner broad- 
cast reports of the flood, news of miss- 
ing persons and messages of encour- 
agement. The good-will impact of th i r- 
measure was proved by the stream of 
requests for Flexner's talks that were 
received after the flood. During the 
war, too, commercials plugged saving 
for postwar home building and the 
buying of war bonds. 

Today, Flexner's commercials have 
settled down to a pattern that combines 
institutional and direct-selling copy, 
related closely to whatever aspect of 
the business needs a lift. The first ten 
days of each month, for instance, are 
used to plug investments; because 
money invested during that time starts 
earning interest as of the first of the 
month. Of late, Flexner has also begun 
a system of dedicating musical num- 
bers to customers. A piece of music is 
dedicated to a recent investor, for ex- 
ample; his name is not given, but the 



Here's how I decide which 
stations I hope to get - 



Referring to building lists for spot radio cam- 
paigns, one important Media Director says: 

"I check STANDARD RATE on everything in it about 
the stations in the markets we've selected. Then I 
check the station reps. I check the surveys on 
number of homes that listen and I also look into 
the listenership ratings." 

It's a nerve-racking job, isn't it, when you can't get 
the data you want. Or when it takes too long to 
get it. Many stations are making it easier by run- 
ning Service-Ads that supplement and expand the 
data in their suds listings. The KH.MO Service-Ad 
shown here, for instance, offers a new survey agen- 
cies and advertisers will want. Other Service-Ads 
give other kinds "f information that helps buyers 
buy. Watch for them when you're using srds. 




NOW AVAILABLE ! 

SEE KHMO FOR NEW SURVEY 
COVERING LISTENING HABITS 
IN 38- COUNTIES OF MISSOURI, 
ILLINOIS and IOWA 

V*i -til por yov to i*< *• r.»w Svm. I°49 Conk>» S'-d. 
of lnt«mng fob.'i |ui( compUlttd in th» Tn Sto<« otao ol 

Mutoun, lllirpon and Iowa Thu report iho«i ai'Oundtff 
ravctatrWU l«odi«g *o •<onon-n<al tim» buying. 



o.lobl. I 






. — . _w- a iMu&*a£ JbfaotA 



i:<n'.i'ifeta4 



1070 KC 



This Service-Ad appears for your 
convenience near the KHMO list- 
ing in sno> Radio Section. 



Inc 



STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE, 

The National Authority Serving the Media Buying Function 

Walter E. Botthof, Publisher 

333 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO 1, ILLINOIS 

NEW YORK • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES 



59 



town he lives in is mentioned. Flexner 
finds that these dedications are notice- 
ably followed by the arrival of addi- 
tional customer- from the same local- 
ity. Since the Association accepts 
money for investment from any part 
of the country but confines its lending 
activities to a fifty-mile radius of 
Louisville, the content of the commer- 
cials is also varied slightly too, in ac- 
cordance with the coverage of the sta- 
tion they are being aired over. 1 1 here 
are. incidentally, names from all over 
the country in the Association's books. 
Many of them, Flexner says, are hold- 
overs from "the early days of radio 
when there were only a few stations 
on the air and our programs reached 
from coast to coast.") 

The company has kept a sharp eye 
out for improvements within the or- 
ganization. In 1933. it became the 
first organization of its kind in Ken- 
tucky to operate under a Federal char- 
ter and federally insure its savings and 
investment accounts. The home re- 
search plan, set up during the war, be- 
came a kind of giant home lending 
library with photographs and plans of 
more than three thousand houses. The 
plans, including specifications, floor 
plans, mill lists and lumber lists, are 
furnished free of charge to customers 
who wish to take out home loans. Re- 
cently they completely remodeled their 
four-story offices in Louisville and add- 
ed such customer-appeal features as 
Muzak and small rockers for children. 

Today the company's coverage of 
Louisville radio is so extensive that it 
should be difficult even for Flexner to 
keep track of his programs. Spending 
three-quarters of its $75,000 advertis- 
ing budget on radio, Greater Louis- 
ville starts its week on the air with a 
15-minute program on WGRC at 6:30 
in the morning. This is followed by 
I") minutes on WKYW at 6:45, on 
W INN at 7:00, WAVE at 7:15, and on 
W KLO at 7:30— all broadcast Monda\ 
through Saturday. While the programs 
for each station are different, they all 
consist of four transcribed march se- 
lections, with opening and (losing an- 
nouncements and a two-and-one-half- 
minute commercial l>\ Flexner in the 
middle. Says Flexner, "By using the 
five station-, beginning at 6:30 and 
running until 7:45. it lias been proved 
i" us that we <an catch people no mat- 
ter what time they get up." 

Hut that's only the beginning of the 
company's radio day. At 11:45 there 
is a daily 15-minute program of tran- 



scribed classical and semi-classical mu- 
sic over WGRC, with the same kind of 
announcements and middle commer- 
cial. Over WINN, there is a daily 5- 
minute musical program at 12:25 with 
three-and-one-quarter minutes of mu- 
sic, one-and-three-quarler of message. 

The company uses the air in the 
evening hours, too. They sponsor a 
daily 15-minute newscast at 5:45 over 
FM station WRXW — a station they 
started buying before it was a year 
old. Over WKLO goes the Greater 
Louisville Music Room Program of 
semi-classical music for 15 minutes 
every Sunday afternoon. On Saturday 
nights at 6, the Greater Louisville Hour 
goes out simultaneously over WINN 
and WKLO. This live program fea- 
tures the Greater Louisville Ensemble, 
a mixed quartet that has been on the 
air for the company, over one station 
or another, for the last twenty-five 
years. The Greater Louisville Hour 
originates in the company's studio, 
with Flexner doing the commercials 
live, and is fed to the stations by an 
engineer. 

As for television, Mr. Flexner does 
not think it will affect his buying of 
radio time, although he hopes that his 
company will grow with the new medi- 
um as it did with radio. The company 
went into television for the first time 
on November 24th, sponsoring an im- 
portant local football gave over 
WAVE-TV. On December 1st. a daily 
one-minute spot program was started 
over the same station and Flexner 
hopes to follow this soon with a week- 
Is 15-minute program. 



JOSKE'S 

{Continued from page 25) 

looked more than a bit damp by mid- 
morning. Emergency flood activity 
outside the store was urgent, and swift. 
Inside, anxiet) over the state of the 
city. The empty aisles at Joske's looked 
ominous. It rapidly reached a point 
wher ad manager James Keenan de- 
cided some emergency measures were 
also indicated for the stoer. 

Like all in the Alamo City, he dialed 
the radio for latest information, tun- 
ing in first to Joske's year-round-spon- 
sored newscast on KITE. What be 
heard from Chief Meteorologist Orin 
Fdrington — brought in by special lines 
for a minute-by-minute account of con- 
ditions over the station — was encour- 



aging. "It's all over," he told listen- 
ers; "let's get back to normal." Police 
officers, also broadcasting over speciaj 
lines, were equally assuring. 

Further dialing brought in Henry 
Guerro's news 6>n WOAI. He was re- 
assuring, too. "Let's get back to nor- 
mal." Let's in effect, get over to 
Joske's. 

Keenan then and there decided to 
let loose a flood of his own. Calling 
for all 50-word availabilities on KTSA, 
KABC, KONO, KIWW and KCOR 
(the last two Spanish-language stations 
to cover the hard-hit Hexar county's 
160,000 citizens of Mexican descent), 
Keenan went to work with Violet 
Short, Joske's radio director, and Bob 
Holleron, radio account manager of 
the Pitluk advertising agency. 

The trio knocked out copy on the 
double, plugging the fact that teh store 
would be open for shopping until nine 
thta night. Delivered to stations by 
hand, it was on the air within an hour. 

The hand-in-glove "it's all over, let's 
get back to normal" and "Joske's will 
be open till nine tonight," repeated at 
10-minute intervals over all stations, 
had immediate effect. 

Relieved shoppers arrived in holiday 
and buying mood, by car, bus, and 
taxi. At store closing time that night, 
Joske's had rung up the third largest 
day in its sales history. The following 
day, bombarded by similar announce- 
ments from 6:40 a.m. to 9:15 p.m., 
the customers more than got into the 
spirit of things. 

For the week ending 29 October, 
here's what the Federal Reserve statis- 
tics show: San Antonio sales up 46 
per cent in retail sales compared with 
the same period in 1948; a Fort 
Worth increase of two per cent; a 
Dallas decline of one per cent; a drop 
in Houston sales of four per cent. And 
a national average department store 
drop of seven per cent. 

San Antonio's increase was attrib- 
uted by the 4 November issue of The 
Wall Street Journal to the Joske-Days 
sales. 

"Without minimizing the \ilal role 
played by other media used, in the 
o\erall success of Joske days," says 
advertising manager Jim Keenan, "we 
attribute an important part of our first 
two days' record to our radio adver- 
tising. It proved again two of radio's 
greatest advantages and selling points: 
instant accessibility and complete flex- 
ibilitv." • * * 



60 



SPONSOR 



tO West 52nd 



[Continued from page 7) 

I capitalize COMMERCIAL because 
I presume that was the basis for not 
including WJR in your review of sta- 
tions activities in rural programming. 
And I must confess you were justified 
in passing up WJR. For fifteen years 
now we have been serving Midwest 
farmers on a purely public service 
basis. 

We must be doing a pretty fair job 
of doing that. One of the biggest radio 
advertisers in the country made a sur- 
vey of the WJR rural area with the 
view to determining the best and 
cheapest medium through which to 
contact farmers and following their 
farm-to-farm canvass the advertising 
manager wrote their agency: 

"I am thoroughly convinced, after 
making this study, that Marshall Wells 
(WJR Farm Editor I has the outstand- 
ing farm show in the country . I have 
never seen such enthusiastic response 
for a single show as we received from 
the farmers in our study. I can only 
say that I am extremely sorry that 
after we are all set to buy this show. 
WJR does not see fit to sell the pro- 
gram to us." 

Perhaps readers of sponsor Maga- 
zine would like to know how WJR has 
won such predominance in the rural 
field that the Director of the State De- 
partment of Agriculture stated that 
from 75 to 90 percent of people at- 
tending farm organization meetings 
have indicated that they are regular 
listeners to WJR's farm program. Here 
is a capsule outline of what WJR has 
done and is doing: 

1. Made a thorough canvass of all 
rural interests to determine the type 
of farm program desired and the best 
time of broadcast. 

2. Developed three programs of 
strictly farm interest, "Farm Forum" 
weekdays at 6:30 a.m.. "Voice of Agri- 
culture," Saturdays at 6:30 a.m. and 
"Farming Marches On." Saturdays at 
7:30 a.m., all SUSTAINING. 

3. Arranged for and broadcast on- 
the -spot weather reports from numer- 
ous points throughout the entire WJR 
primary area. 

4. Invested approximately $50,000 
in a mobile studio dedicated to farm 
service and used extensively for the re- 
mote origination of farm programs. 

5. Established a close working 



agreement with Michigan State Col- 
lege to assure the accuracy and time- 
liness of all information carried on 
the farm programs. 

6. Works closeh with f-H Clubs, 
the Grange. Farm Bureau, numerous 
local farm groups and the State De- 
partment of Agriculture to obtain di- 
rect reports on conditions, develop- 
ments and news of value to farmers. 

7. Performs its own reportorial job 
rather than relying solely on wire 
services or governmental releases. 

8. Cooperates with all farm groups 
in supplying speakers and talent for 
meetings. 

9. Gives liberal announcements to 
farm group meetings. 

10. Publicizes, without charge, auc- 
tions and the public sale of farm equip- 
ment that would be of interest to 
farmers. 

1 think one reason for WJR's amaz- 
ing success in the rural field is that we 
treat farmers like people. Some farm 
broadcasters talk down to the farmer, 
speak a dialict loaded with ungram- 
matical expressions in the belief that 
farmers like this approach. We have 
found farmers highly intelligent - 



many of them are college graduates. 
We have a high respect for them as 
listeners and a keen appreciation of 
their evaluation of radio programs. 
Except for specific information and 
news about farm activities and farm 
markets, the farmer's choice of enter- 
tainment is pretty much the same as 
that of his urban cousin. 

You'll be interested in a recent sur- 
vey of 94 counties in the WJR primary 
area in which farmers were asked: 
"To which station do you and your 
family listen most frequently?" 35% 
named WJR for the 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 
a.m. period with the next nearest sta- 
tion mentioned receiving only 7%. Ap- 
proximately the same percentages were 
true for all other periods day and 
night. 

I'm certainly looking forward to the 
next "bonus" you have promised us 
subscribers to SPONSOR. In these sup- 
plementary reports you are performing 
a very worthwhile service to the radio 
industry. 

Worth Cramer 

Asst. General Maanger 

WJR, Detroit 



Worcester's BEST Buy I 

Call in our rep today! Ask him to show you the latest report 
. . . the October-November Hooper Index! Look it over and 
see for yourself that WNEB delivers wilh the 

LOWEST COST PER 
THOUSAND LISTENERS 

. . . the loivest cost of any station in 

WORC ESTER. MASSACHUSETTS 




Represented bv : The [tolling Company, Inc. and Ketlell-Carter, Inc. 



2 JANUARY 1950 



61 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



((/?/■ 



Santa on the air 

For all his roly-poly hulk, Santa al- 
ways has been able to sail through the 
air with the greatest of ease. 

\\ hich makes the affinity between 
the merry old gent ami radio natural 
indeed. 

Santa was working earl\ and late 
with radio stations this yulelide sea- 
son, if reports flowing to sponsor's 
office are any indication. 

He came early to WREN, Topeka. 
Over 6,000 people waited to greet him 
when he arrived, at the invitation of 
WREN, with ten elfish helpers on No- 
vember 26. He hung around until 
Christmas and helped merchants of 
North Topeka boost their anticipated 
Christmas sales about 20%. 

KITE, San Antonio, didn't take any 
chances. On December 10 the station 
dispatched its own new- correspondent 



1>\ plane to Santa's headquarters at 
the North Pole. He hung around until 
the zero hour, reporting all details of 
Santa's preparations to visit the Alamo 
City, even helping him with his sack 
on the long flight. 

KM A. Shenandoah, exchanged 
Christmas Eve programs with Ameri- 
can Radio Station RIAS in Berlin. 
Germain, to help the rotund gift-giveh 
on his journey. A choir in Berlin 
joined with another at Staton, Iowa, to 
express Christmas greetings. 

AT WBAL and WBAL-TV Santa 
worked overtime bringing the B&O 
Chorus to the NBC Network Christmas 
Eve, sending Dickens' Scrooge via tele- 
vision, and generally cavorting through 
the Baltimore air. 

Santa really rolled up his sleeves 
and got downright commercial when 
the folks at WSM, Nashville, caught 
up with him. They made him paint 
their yearend program schedule Santa- 
green-and-red. And on top of that they 
made him promise lots of business. 

He delivered too. 



Mail Order Radio 

Oliver B. Capelle, Sales Promotion 
Manager of Miles Laboratories, writes 
in a letter to SPONSOR: 

"Your story 'Is mail order good for 
radio' seems overly charitable to the 
station practice of selling time on a 
per inquiry basis. From personal ob- 
servation I submit that current abuses 
are harming station reputations and 
disturbing thoughtful advertisers who 
pay card rates (see "40 W. 52" for 



complete letter I . 

We are in wholehearted agreement 
with Mr. Capelle on the per inquirv 
phase of mail order selling. No re- 
sponsible publication can condone 
practices which are known to create 
an unhealthy and unsteady business 
climate for sponsors and stations alike. 

sponsor's purpose in studying and 
recording the mushrooming growth of 
mail order sales is to explore and 
clarify the methods used and to bring 
the unwholesome practices out into the 
open. Certainly, nothing is gained bv 
ignoring an existing and, in places, a 
flourishing business. In the full lime- 
light of factual publicity the more in- 
sidious practices are less likely to look 
profitable. 

Publications of mail order methods 
and practices by no means implies 
sponsor's editorial approval. 

Singing convincer 

There's a lot of sell in a song. 

Since we undertook our investiga- 
tion of singing commercials our eyes 
have been opened on a form of adver- 
tising that just spouts results. 

To the old complaint that radio can't 
work for a department store we cite 
"The store that j ingles built'' in Buffalo. 

To the protest that railroads are too 
conservative for breezy lines we point 
to the Lackawana lyrics sweeping the 
east. 

Whether it's shampoo or shoes, 
autos or foods, there's a singing com- 
mercial for your product. 



Applause 



P&C's Media Policy 

Shrewd advertisers have continually 
solved the problem of selling their 
products b) selecting the best media 
with which to promote them. They 
have never considered increasing ap- 
piopriations for one media a justified 
reason to abandon another. Procter 
and Gamble has repeated!) recognized 
this fact. 

In a contemplated move i<> up its 
television expenditures, P&G is taking 



a long range view of all media. Ex- 
ecutives of the organization consider 
the product and then decide what me- 
dia will sell it best. Procter and Gam- 
ble does not expect to rush brashly 
into television at the expense of other 
media. The value of any media is 
mea-ured b\ the sales it produces. 

For its multi-million dollar radio 
budget, the largest in the histor) of 
advertising. I\\C used the same yard- 
Stick. However, radio has proven to be 
a vital factor iti keeping its sales 



geared to the level of the past few 
years. Therefore, present indications 
are that P&G's radio allocations will 
remain untouched. 

Procter and Gamble officials realize 
that TV is a lust) infant, while radio 
is an established industry. They treat 
(hem as separate units, as they do 
newspaper-, maga/ines, billboards, etc 
Manx other cleat -thinking advertisers 
realize this, and follow the policy used 
l>\ I '\< . and lon» ad\ ocated 1>\ SPON- 
SOR. 



62 



SPONSOR 





ROPED 



TIED 



•o 



READY FOR BRANDING ! 



That's the breezy Arizona way of telling 
you that more than 

HALF A MILLION ARIZONANS 

who, annually, spend more than 

HALF A BILLION DOLLARS 

in KOOL's retail trading area provide a 
ready-made, loyal audience 

for YOUR SALES MESSAGE 

- made doubly responsive by KOOL's 
active showmanship and local promotion 

"f" the consistently top-Hooperated 

COLUMBIA NETWORK PROGRAMMING 




Key Station of the 

Radio Network of Arizona. 

KOOL, Phoenix 
KCKY, Coolidgc 
KOPO, Tucson 

100% coverage of Arizona's 
richest area comprising 75% 
of the State's population. 



Your COLUMBIA Station 



IN ARIZONA 



5,000 WATTS DAY and NIGHT 960 KCs 

Phone, wire or write for availabilities today 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

George P. Hollingberry Co. 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • ATLANTA 



»- V g 



**' 



«* 



** 



y» 




~76e &e4t ck Ttecvt (Zov&iayef 

Working hand in hand, Westinghouse WBZ and 
the independent Boston Post ("The Great Break- 
last Table Newspaper of New England") merge 
news-gathering and news-dispensing facilities to 
give New Englanders accurate, up-to-the-minute 
reports of the BIG news stories. Last month's 
election, lor example, was covered over WBZ 
by the Post's political experts. . while the news- 
paper and WBZ-TV joined forces to bring 
viewers live reports on election events throughout 



New England. 



«*^!iif 



.oston 



mRnT 



•BflBH* 



CiV 



Frtl 



^IXJ^JSB 



Tirw« 



.13* 



Listeners, viewers, and readers appreciate this 
authentic news highlighted over WBZ and WBZ-TV, 
and reported fully in the Post (above). 




7<^e &e&t ut s4cccUettce (^overa^ef 

WBZ, supplemented by the synchronous voice 
of WBZA in Springfield, gives unexcelled cover- 
age of populous New England. WBZ programs, 
in fact, reach 80% of this rich, six-state market. 
In 50%-100% BMB daytime counties alone, the 
W BZ market includes almost 1 Yi million families 
with a purchasing power of %GA billion! For 
availabilities on this sales-productive station, con- 
tact WBZ or our national representatives. 




BOSTON 

50,000 WATTS 
NBC AFFILIATE 



and WBZ-TV 

WESTINGHOUSE RADIO STATIONS Inc 

KDKA • WOWO • KEX • KYW • WBZ • WBZA • WBZ-TV 

National Representatives, Ftee & Peters, except lor WBZ-TV; (or WBZ-TV. NBC Spot Sales 




6 JANUARY 1950 



$8.00 a Year 





^ 



o* 




Bretton finds 
way back — p. 24 

CCS s prize package — page 21 



A N Co NBOA 
v 7 V 1 d fc3"mJ3>OOu 

I IS V IV NO I I 

3 fl . I D N V H d 



RtCt«VtO_ 
JAN 1? l55 ° 

NBC GENERAL LIBRARY 




I 



Bretton 
learned from 
Speidel 

page 24 



Airlines on 
the air 



TV 
commercials 

page 32 

Critique 
on co-op 

page 36 



TV Results 

page 44 

1 

Mr. Sponsor: 
Walter 
Mack, Jr. 

page 16 



Mr. Sponsor 
Asks 



Applause 

page 62 




TV 



(ud U(£m/h^ jdx$^ $- 



50,000 WATTS + 1A CLEAR CHANNEL ^ 840 KILOCYCLES 

VICTOR A. SHOLIS, Director • NEIL D. CLINE, Soles Dirccfor 

REPRESENTED NATIONAllY BY 
EDWARD PETRY AND COMPANY 



THE ONLY RADIO STATION SERVING+ALL Of THE RICH KENTUCKIAHA MARKET 




TS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS. . J 




RECEIVED 

JAN 17 h 
C GENERAL LIE 



..SPONSOR REPORT 



New BMB Study 

probably out in 

mid-February 



Lever expects 

20% sales gain 

in 1950 



Broadcast 

Advertising 

Bureau to be 

Strengthened 



Ford uses radio 

extensively in 1 950 

model showings 



Big demand for 
radios in 1949 



1950 a year 

of agency 

shifts? 



16 January 1950 

Best estimate available now is that new BMB study will not be out 
until about 15 February. Tabulating delays have plagued hardworking 
Ken Baker, BMB head. 

-SR- 

Lever Brothers faces the new year with optimism. Company president 
Charles Luckman anticipates a 20% sales gain in 1950. Advertising and 
merchandising budgets will be "substantially increased" over 1949 
totals. Lever's new synthetic detergent "Surf," the non-rinse clothes 
cleaner, has equalled the sales rate of "Rinso" in Philadelphia, 
Chicago and Los Angeles. 

-SR- 

Recommendation of NAB Radio Committee, Television Committee, and BAB 
Committee provides for freer rein for Broadcast Advertising Bureau. 
Action in Washington 10 January calls for BAB to report only to Presi- 
dent Justin Miller. NAB Board will act on recommendation. 

-SR- 

The Ford Motor Company has bought large segments of radio time to 
exploit its 1950 model showings. Through J. Walter Thompson, the 
company signed to sponsor 15 Mutual Broadcasting System package shows, 
from January 4-18; a total of six hours and five minutes of broadcast- 
ing time during this period. Ford has launched a big spot campaign. 

-SR- 

The demand for radios in 1949 compared favorably with prewar years. 
By year's end the nation had bought 10 million sets. In his annual 
statement, John W. Craig, vice president of the Avco Manufacturing 
Corporation, predicted that in 1950 the country will buy approximately 
6,000,000 home radios and 3,000,000 automobile sets. 

-SR- 

Important account changes are in the wind, one or two that will soon 
startle the industry. Television is at root of much advertiser rest- 
lessness, with TV-wise agencies due to benefit. 



SPONSOR Moves to 510 Madison Avenue 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. has moved its New York Headquarters from 40 W. 52 St. 
to 510 Madison Avenue, Zone 22. Nearly all of the third floor of the Profes- 
sional Building will be occupied by SPONSOR'S nine-office suit. An expanded 
switchboard service is utilized. The new telephone is Murray Hill 8-2772. 



SPONSOR. Volume I. No. 2. 16 January. 1950. Published biweekly for SPONSOR Publications Inc., at 8110 Elm An- .. Ballimore 11. M<! BxKUtlra, Editorial. Circulation Office 
MO Madison Ave . New York 22. $8 a year in I' S f'J elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January' 1949 at Baltimore, Md. pontoflVo under Act .i March 1879 



REPORTS.. .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR Rl 



NBC has record 
sales year 



Despite the loss of many of its top programs, and stars in 1949, the 
National Broadcasting Company closed the year by amassing a record 
shattering gross income, resulting from sales of its radio and tele- 
vision facilities. NBC's gross network billings for the past year 
topped all other networks. 



Anahist sponsoring 

two radio network 

programs 



-SR- 

The Anahist Company has strengthened its efforts to capture the bulk 
of the newly established antihistaimine market. The company is cur- 
rently selling its product on two AM shows over 345 stations of the 
Mutual Broadcasting System; The Falcon, Sunday, 7-7:30 p.m. EST; and 
T rue and False, Saturday, 5-5:30 p.m. EST. Anahist sponsired, ABC ' s 
Countersp y during the last month of 1949. 



-SR- 

TV film deal First rate motion pictures will be a steady diet for televiewers in 
completed 1950. Standard Television Corporation has concluded a contract with 
the J. Arthur Rank Organization, Inc., in the United States for 75 
feature films. Many of the pictures have not been released yet. The 
total production costs of these films is $50,000,000. 

-SR- 

Omaha gets Residents of Omaha polled in a two week test conducted on 25 radio- 
Transitradio equipped buses, voted 5-1 for transitradio. KBON-FM will beam programs 

to 235 buses from 6 a.m. -9 p.m. on weekdays and from noon to 9 p.m. 

on Sundays. 

-SR- 



Dodge fights for 

fourth place in 

1950 automotive 

sales race 



With an increased advertising budget for 1950, which includes radio 
as a major medium, the Chrysler Corporation will attempt to raise the 
Dodge national sales standing from seventh place to fourth. In 1950 
the corporation will make considerably more than the 270,000 vehicles 
it produced in 1949. 



-SR- 

TV may aid Television may be an important educational aid in the future. A survey 
education is being conducted by the University of Cincinnati in 14 city high 

schools to determine to what extent television can supplement standard 
teaching methods. Radio station WLW, and the Crosley Broadcasting 
Corporation are financing the project. 

-SR- 



Jack Benny again For the second time this season Jack Benny has climbed to the top of 
leads Hooperatings Hooper's program ratings. Benny, who in recent years has consistent- 
ly led Hooper's lists, had slipped to eighth place in the September 
15-21 ratings. Walter Winchell squeezed up to tenth place from twelfth. 

-please turn to page 40 

7 SPONSOR 




willie wish . . . 



is all packed and ready to move 

into a beautiful, spanking new building. From bere, 

more efficiently than ever, Willie WISH 

makes advertiser's dreams come true, producing results 

at one of the lowest sales costs in radio. 

Why is tins so? 

Ask vour Free & i'eters Colonel ! 



that powerful puller in Indianapolis 



iHn -i i_-n T 





OF INDIANAPOLIS 

affiliated with AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY 

GEORGE J. HIGGINS, General Manager 



mH^BB^BSH 




FEATURES 



Sponsor Reports 

510 Madison Ave. 
Outlook 

New and Renew 




Vol. 4 no. 2 



16 January 1950 



i 

6 

8 

13 



Mr. Sponsor: Walter S. Mack, Jr. 16 

P.S. 18 

Mr. Sponsor Asks 42 

TV Results 44 

TV Comparagraph 47 

Sponsor Speaks 62 

Applause 62 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Ellen L. Davis 

Senior Editors: Frank M. Bannister, Irving Marder, 
Miles David 

Assistant Editors: Joe Gould, Fred Birnbaum 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice President in charge advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Director: Lester J. Blumenthal 

Advertising Department: Jerry Glynn, Jr. (Chicago 
Manager), Edwin D. Cooper (West Coast Man- 
ager), M. H, LeBlang, Beatrice Turner, William 
Ethe 

Vice-President & Business Manager: Bernard Piatt 

Circulation Department: Ann Ostrow, Emily Cutillo, 
Victoria Woods 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

monlhlj bj SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS. INC. K\ 
ullvi Bdlmrlal, and Advertising Ofllcei 510 Madlion Ave 
!*ew fork 22 N V Telephone Murrey Hill 8-2772 Chicago 
orrice: 360 N Michigan Avenue Telephone: Financial 
I'rlnllne Ofllce 8110 Elm Ive., Baltimore 11, Md 
tloni: United Ht«lc« |x a year ( sna.la an.l f. 
Hinel<- coplei 50c Printed In r. B A Addreai all ...m- 

l[Hjcicl«-hrr l/i MO Ma!; N ^ I ,,,, 

rllhl 19r.(l SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



digest 



Packaging returns 
to the networks 



Bretton doesn't 
mind being shown 



BBM works in 
Canada 



Airlines on the air 



Does your TV 
commercial sell? 



Critique on co-op 



Lightning that 
Talks 



Department store 
radio 



After midnight 
audience 



The Banana gal 



Radio gets out 
the vote 



ARTICLES 



All four chains are busy building their own 
shows for sponsorship . . . and with reason. 



When friendly competitor Speidel learned 
how watchbands could be sold, Bruner- 
Ritter caught on quick. 



Advertisers and broadcasters say that money 
invested in Canadian radio measurement is 
well spent. 



It's ceiling zero for many an airline when it 
comes to radio sponsorship. A SPONSOR 
survey. 



Two New York area studies on first-time 
purchases via TV. 



Advertisers can improve their use of co- 
operative radio advertising. Here's how. 



IN FUTURE ISSUES 



SPONSOR'S SOUVENIR EDITION will be 
100', devoted to the all-radio presentation 
film. 



Department stores in many parts of the 
country are using radio . . . with great re- 
sults. 



A SPONSOR analysis on the commercial 
possibilities of reaching the midnight-owl 
millions. 



United Fruit and radio have made a national 
institution . . . Chiquita Banana. 



Politicians are learning to use radio and TV 
as effectively as any soap ad expert. 



21 



24 



26 



28 



32 



36 



30 January 



13 February 



13 February 



13 February 




■ . YOU take? 
Which would Yu ^^ 



— -^— — . 




Are you eyeing the bigger one? That's natural. 
We all want the most for our money. 

And that makes a point about the audience 
you get when you advertise on WGAR. 

The pie is bigger than it was last year. The 
potential audience is greater! 

*Sept. Oct. '48 Sets-in-use 21.9 

Sept. Oct. '49 Sets-in-use 23.4 

And the slice of the pie is bigger on WGAR. 
WGAR's share of audience is also greater! 

Sept. Oct. '48 Share of audience 23.1 
Sept. Oct. '49 Share of audience 24.8 

This means 15 percent more listeners to 
WGAR programs today. So you get the bigger 
slice of the bigger pie when you advertise on 
Cleveland's Friendly Station. 

Call your Petry man for facts about 
Cleveland's Friendly Station. 




WGAR 



50,000 WATTS -CLEVELAND 



♦Hooper Index of Total Rated Time Periods 
Sept. Oct. '48 
Sept. Oct. '49 



16 JANUARY 1950 



Represented Nationally by Edward Petry & Company 




jVtdeh 



c.*-*' 



v iv*° 



If you're prospecting 
for sales in French 
Canada, keep in mind 
that you can reach 7 
out of every 10 French 
radio families through 
CKAC, Montreal. 



I 



CBS Outlet In Montreal 

Key Station of the 

TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 



CMC 



T 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives! 

Adam J. Young Jr. - New York, Chicago 

William Wright • Toronto 



510 Madison 



2,250 MEN REFORTED 

We have recently experienced a 
great success story for radio's power 
as an advertising medium as well as 
its flexibility. 

A few days before Christmas the 
mail piled up in the Boston and Maine's 
North Station to such a degree that 
they had to have additional help to 
handle it quickly. 

George Hill. Publicity Director of 
the Boston and Maine Railroad, called 
us that morning at 10:30. We bought 
a schedule of announcements on four 
Boston radio stations (the first one 
went on the air at 10:59 A.M.) and 
they were scheduled through 2:30 
P.M. At 11:50 A.M. Mr. Hill called 
us advising that they had more men 
than they needed then. The balance of 
the schedule was cancelled. The final 
count — 2,250 men reported. 

We would be very happy to have 
you use this story in sponsor if you 
wish to do so. 

Jan Gilbert 

Timebuyer 

Harold Cabot & Co., Boston 



WAG WAGNER & DENNIS DAY 

Enjoyed reading Wag Wagner's let- 
ter (19 December). I think that your 
readers would be interested to know 
that Wag is not only a great "jingle- 
smith,'' but also a very fine tunesmith. 
His latest song, "Pancho Is a Fool*' 
was recently recorded by Dennis Day 
for RCA Victor. 

David Kohlenberg 
Kohlenberg Furniture Co. 
Detroit, Michigan 



MINITAPE RECORDER 

Would you be kind enough to let 
me know the make of the wire recorder 
that is shown on the cover of your 
December 19 issue. It appears to be 
a new lightweight model that might 
have fiood uses in market research 
work as well as in publicity interview- 
ing. 

M. F. House, 
Exec, vice president 
Morse International 
New York 

• Tlir \l,.,n ,,.. wirr rrcnr<lrr ran !»«' purchased 
through Standi ii..if„. ... 3857 HVrry Conn, 
North Hollywood, Calif. 



Is frequency 
important? 





you bet it is ! 

...and it's doubly important 
in radio. For example, WHTN 
has Huntington's most favor- 
able frequency (800 kc.) and 
is Huntington's only clear 
channel station. That gives 
WHTN the best .5 mv m con- 
tour of any station in town, 
regardless of power, plus a 
clear, strong signal that 
reaches the homes of over 
100,000 families. Add to this 
an FM bonus on WHTN-FM, 
most powerful FM station in 
the Central Ohio Valley, and 
you've got a low-cost, high 
power medium for tapping 
the gold in these hills. Take a 
look at the Huntington Market 
...then make up your mind 
to get your share by using 
WHTN and WHTN-FM. 

THE POPULAR STATION 

AA/UITLM 



(00 KC W W ■ ■ ■ ■ ™i005Mt 
.000 *tlll 41 000 WATtl 

HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

For availabilities, rates and 
other information, wire, write 
or phone 

PACE-WILES. INC.. 

Advertising 
Huntington, West Virginia 
National Representatives 



SPONSOR 



99 TV RESULTS 

My friend, J. C. Smith, advertising 
manager of Brown-Dunkin Co. (de- 
partment store), Tulsa, Oklahoma, has 
asked me for case histories of TV suc- 
cesses on the part of department stores. 
Our television department here at 
BBD&O tells me that you have issued 
your "99 Case Histories" in booklet 
form. I have seen several of the stories 
in our company scrapbook and they 
look like the material Mr. Smith seeks. 
I'll appreciate it greatly if you will 
send him a copy. If there is am charge 
I will gladly send a check. 

Lloyd N. I in 
BBD&O, N. ). 

• 99 TV Results is available to new Subscriber! 
without charge. Additional copies COSt Sl.OO eaeh. 



TUNE-0 

Thank you most sincerelv for your 
excellent report on MUSICAL TUNE-0 
in the P.S. column, December 19th 
issue of sponsor. 

To clarify some of the statements 
regarding the creation of Tune-O. how- 
ever, we would like to pass along this 
additional information for your files. 

Tune-0 is a Bichard H. Ulman Inc 
production. The show was created by 
Bobert D. Buchanan, copyright owner 
and a member of our organization. All 
copyrights on Tune-0 have been as- 
signed to Bichard H. Ulman Inc and 
we are exclusive sales representative 
for Tune-0. 

Incidentally. Tune-0 is not only set- 
ting records in New York City, but in 
some 150 other markets from Miami 
to Honolulu. Tremendous results in 
these additional markets duplicate the 
smash sales success story in New York. 
Bichard H. Ulman, President 
Richard H . Ulman Inc 
Buffalo, New York 




RURAL LISTENERS REPRINT 

We would like to reprint a conden- 
sation of the article, "Bural Listeners 
are Worth Cultivating But Don't For- 
get to Talk Their Language," which 
appeared on page 30 of the July 18 
issue. May we have your permission 
to do so? 

Full credit will, of course, be given. 
M. A. Shallat 
Editorial Director 
Publishers Digest Inc 
Chicago. Illinois 

• SPONSOR'S policy of authorizing only full 
reprint of its articles is relaxed to permit Pub. 
Ushers Dipest to maintain its romlcnsation for- 
mula. 

16 JANUARY 1950 



i 



Example 



#21 



f 



WIP produces promotion, too! 
From a letter written us by the 
Gillette Safety Razor Company 
. . . "It is hardly necessary to 
mention how vastly pleased we 
are with the very complete pro- 
motional job you do for us on 
the World Series each year. As 
we have told you before, your 
aggressive merchandising ranks 
right up with the very best 
that we enjoy anywhere in the 
country." Nice? 



WIP 

Philadelphia 
Basic Mutual 

Represented Nationally 



I IMV \KI> PETItY & CO 




Forecasts oj things to come, as 
seen by SPONSOR'S editors 



Outlook 



Commerce Secretary foresees 
volume business in early 1950 

General optimism is reflected in reports to the National 
Association of Purchasing Agents which predict good busi- 
ness for the first quarter of 1950. Meanwhile, Secretary of 
Commerce Charles Sawyer says the volume of business in 
early 1950 won't be materially different from the high 
rate of the second half of 1949. 

Radio, TV manufacturers expect 
alltime industry record 

The nation's radio and television manufacturers expect their 
final figures to show $800,000,000 of radio and video sets 
sold, at factory prices, for an alltime industry record. 
Television is expected to account for 65 per cent of the 
dollar total. However, some 10.000.000 new radio sets 
were turned out to bring the total now in use to about 
85.000.000. 

Niles Trammell says 

radio keeping apace with tv 

Looking ahead, NBC Board Chairman Niles Trammell says 
"television is taking the country by storm" but that radio 
"also is getting bigger all the time." "Even in 1951," he 
adds "the radio homes without television will exceed the 
total radio homes of 1940. 

Radio time sales close 
to last year's total 

Radio broadcast time sales will run close to the 1948 figure 
—approximately $400,000,000. At the same time, there 
was an increase of some 225 stations to bring the total 
now on the air, both standard and frequent) modulation, 
to more than 2,800. Television is still in the red but time 
sales should end up around $30,000,000 or three times 
the 1948 total. 

FCC expected to continue 
new TV station ban 

Although there are some 350 applications pending for new 
TV stations, the hot ^uos is that the FCC ban on new 
stations will continue until iliis summer. The ban was im- 
posed I 1 months ago to lei the commission decide whether 
television should be lifted out of the present restricted 
verv high frequenc) area to the almost limitless ultra high 
f r . < j i j » 1 1< \ sphere. Meanwhile. onl\ 12 stations remain to 
be 1'iiilt under permits obtained before the ban was im- 
posed. 

TV networks will have 
own channel next summer 

I he major television networks which now share time mi 
ili< east i<i midwesl coaxial cable \n ill have their problems 



solved by next summer. The American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company has completed construction on a sys- 
tem of radio relay towers between New York and Chicago 
which will add another westbound channel to the present 
three coaxial cable channels — one for each of the four tv 
nets. 

1950 may mark 
radio-tv-film tie-ups 

Despite denials from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. rumors per- 
sist that the film company is thinking of moving into 
Mutual as the first step toward establishing a TV foot- 
hold. At the same time, ABC and 20th Century Fox are 
rumored to be negotiating. A big advantage to a network- 
movie tie-in would be the acquisition of Hollywood talent 
for top radio programing. 

Amendments may save nets 
thousands of dollars 

Two significant benefits that will save the radio stations and 
networks thousands of dollars may be noted in the recently 
enacted amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act. One. 
the amendments, exclude a wide range of talent fees from 
overtime calculations; and they allow child labor in radio 
and television. 

Use of film to increase 
in video programing 

Since increased revenue has not offset operating losses, the 
use of film will increase in this year's tv programing. 
Rising costs of live production, rehearsal charges and cable 
charges will force the "put it on film" economy measure. 

Zenith phonevision up 
for FCC hearings 

The Zenith Radio Corporation, which feels that advertising 
will be unable to support television, hopes to offer the 
video viewer first-run movies and plays with its Phone- 
vision. Telephone lines would be used and the cost to the 
viewer would appear on his phone bill. Hearings on the 
proposed Phonevision service start 16 January before the 
FCC. 

BAB research planned 
for this year 

Two major projects are scheduled in radio 1>\ the new 
Broadcast Advertising Bureau. A research staff is to be set 
up and a preference-type survey and a radio results stud\ 
will be made There will be more emphasis in L950 on 
studying the out-of-home audience. 

Non-net time sales loom 
importantly in 1950 scene 

Since L937 non-network time sales to national and regional 
ad\citi>«i- and sponsors have steadih increased, and >|m| 
radio in |')50 will probabb be emphasized b\ advertisers. 
Starting with a little over S23 million in time sales in 1937. 
-put sales have im reased for well over a decade. I948's 
figure of $104,759,761 was 14.4', higher than the L947 
figure. $110,000,000 is the expected figure for L949 with 
hopes of L950 being another banner year. 



8 



SPONSOR 






Zcde*- 



;• -, \ 




Your John Blair man can tell you more. 890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, \\ AMERICAN AFFILIATE 
16 JANUARY 1950 













/juZZ3L 



RADIO BROADCASTING 

IS DIFFERENT, TOO, 
ON THE PACIFIC COAST! 





Ivadio broadcasting certainly is different on the 
Pacific Coast. Thousands of mountain ranges (5,000 to 14.495 feet high), great distances between 
markets and low ground conductivity all put the Indian sign on long-range broadcasting. 

It is necessary to use local netwoi'k stations located in the important markets to reach all of 
(he people all ol the time. 

Only Don Lee is especially designed for the Pacific Coast. Only Don Lee has a local network 
station in each of 45 important markets (the three other networks combined have only 48 
stations). 

()iil\ Don Pee has the flexibility to offer a local network station in the Pacific Coast markets 
where you have distribution. 



1 1 wis ALLEN WEISS, Chairman of the Board • WILLET n. brown. President • ward d. ingrim, I 'ice-President in Charge of Sales 
1313 north mm vim 1 1. Hollywood 28, CALIFORNIA ■ Represented Nationally by john blair & company 







WfrWfr- 



Of 45 Major Pacific Coast Cities 



ONLY 10 

have stations 
ot all 4 

ncKviiik 




3 

have Don Lee 

and 2 other 

network stations 




8 

have Don Lee 

and 1 other 

network station 




24 

have Don Lee 

and NO other 

network station 



J-Wi: 



m-i 



;c 



SPONSOR 




Ijfcl*. 






It's the most logical, the most economical coverage you can get on the Pacific Coast. Yon buy 
only what you need, and you get what yon buy every time. 

That's why only Don Lee regularly broadcasts as many— or more— regionally sponsored 
programs as the other three networks combined. 

Don Lee Stations on Parade: KNEW-SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 

According to Sales Management's 1949 Survey of Buying Power, Spokane County has a population of 216,200 and retail 

sales totaling $2(i(),l')').00<). The per capita buying power of Spokane Count)/ is 2J. ()', create) than the national average 
while the city of Spokane beats the national average In/ -l~>.2', . When you buy Don Lee in Spokane, the 5000 watts of 
KNEW deliver your sales messages with localized impact throughout this wealthy lostem Washington area. KNEW is 
only one of tS LOCAL Hon Lee stations that reach Pacific Coast families u hen they live— where they spend their mono/'. 



The Nation's Greatest Regional Network 




ii 



Looking for the biggest ? 



Daytime, too, 
station breaks 
on WCBS 
are New York's 



biggest 
buys 



i r..t--'-'" v " v ,-, local P t0 " 
?ra»-P 1US S TcBS* ^*:"-on break ^ eI ; 

SSigVit and day, t c0 sU 

£ reates\ < u , N ..,. > 

c orove ». 



Represented by Radio Sales 







16 JIM IK) 1950 




Cjjlf New on Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



Anahi.t 


Foote Cone ci 


Belding 


MBS 




It. T. Babbitt 


Ihi.in. Jones 




l Its 


1 19 


Dnubledav & Co 


HhImt Roge 




1 It- 


57 




lluhcr Hope 




CBS 


57 


Helbros Watch 


llorland 




Mil 


63 


P. LorillarH 


l.eyer, Newell 
Ganger 


* 


\lt< 


52 


Miles Laboratories 


Wade 




ABC 


67 


Miles Laboratories 


Wade 




NBC 


160 


Muntz Corp 


Shore 




Mils 




Pill. bury Mills 


Burnett 




CBS 


151 




Burnett 




CBS 


151 




PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Adventures of the Falcon; Sun 7-7:30 pm| Jan 1 
Nona Front Nowhere; M-l 3-3:15 pro; Jan •> : .'.2 ..k. 
Galen ltr.ikc: Sun 2:30-45 pm| Jan B; 1.1 »k. 
Quiz Program; Sun 2:45*3 pm; Jan 8; I.'* wk. 
Birhard Diamond) s„„ .->..-> :t" pm| Mar 19; IS »k. 
Dr. I.Q.; W 8-8:30 pm; Jan 4; 52 wks 

Edwin C. Hill; M-F 7-7:05 pm; Jan 2 

One Man's Family; Sun 3-3:30 pm ; Feb 19; 52 wks 

Rebuttal; Sun 9:15-30 pm; Jan 15 

House Party; M-F 3:30-55 pm ; Jan 3; 52 wks 

Cedrir Adams; M-F 3:55-4 pm ; Jan 3; 52 wks 



m^f Renewals on Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Babbit. 

Cities Service Oil Co 

Colgate-Pal molive-Peel 

Colgatc-Palmolive-Peet 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet 

First Church of Christ 

Scientist 
Goodvear Tire & Rublx 

Co 
Andrew Jerpenn Co 
.lo.ifi-.-M .in v il 1. 
I. ever Brother*. 

I. ever Brothers 

Lever Brothers 

Lever Brothers 
Metropolitan Life 

In in ,iti' ■ Co 
Philip Morris 
Philip Morris 
Procter «!v. Gamble 



R. B. Semler Ine 
Sun Oil C« 

Toni Co 

U. S. Tobacco Co 

U. S. Tobacco Co 



Duane Jones 


NBC 


135 


Fllington 


NBC 


82 


Sherman & Marquette 


NBC 


139 


Bates 


NBC 


144 


Bates 


NBC 


144 


Humphrey 


MBS 


65 


Kudner 


ABC 


72 


Bobert W. Orr 


ABC 


266 


J. Walter Thomp-on 


Mils 


40O 


BBD&O 


NBC 

( HI 


153 


Needham, Louis A 


( Its 


169 


Brorby 






J. Walter Thompson 


CBS 


174 


Foote, Cone & Belding 


< RS 


1 7 t 


Young & Rnblcam 


CBS 


26 


Blow 


CBS 


150 


Blow 


NBC 


146 


Benton & Bowles 


l It* 


69 


Compton 


1 Its 


97 


Dancer-Fitsger aid- 


CBS 


110 


Sample 






('omplon 


1 Its 


105 


Compton 


CBS 


87 


Oompton 


< Its 


82 


Frwin. \\ as. J 


MBS 


225 


Hewitt Ogilv> 


Mt( 


34 


Benson & Mather 






Footo. Cone X Belding 


< Its 


ISO 


Kudner 


Mils 


t ll> 


Kudner 


MBS 


382 



David lliirum: M-F ll:45-noon; Jan 9; 52 wks 

Cities Service Band of America) M 9:30-10;; Jan 30; 52 wks 

Sports Newsreel; Fri 10:30-45 pm; Jan <> ; 52 »k. 

A Day in the Life of Dennis Day; Sat 9:30-10 pm : Jan 7: 52 ..k. 

Judy Canova Show; Sat 10-10:30 pm; Jan 6; 52 wks 

Beligious; Sun 9:45-10 am; Jan 1 

The Greatest Story Kver Told; Sun 5:30-6 pm: Jan 1 : 52 wk. 

Lonella Parsons; Sun 9:15-30 pm ; Jan 1; 52 >.k- 

Bill Henry & The News; M-F 8:55-9 pm ; Jan 2; 52 »U 

Bob Hope Show; Tu 9-9:30 pm ; Jan 3; 52 wks 

Junior Miss; Sat 11 :30-noon; Jan 7; 52 wks 

Lux Theatre; M 9-10 pm ; Jan 2; 52 »k- 

My Friend Irma; M 10-10:30 pm; Jan 2; 52 sk- 

F.rir Sevarciil; M-F 6-6:15 pm ; Jan 2: 13 wks 

Crime Photographer; Th 9:30-10pm: Jan 26; 52 « k - 
This Is Your Life: W 8-8:30 pm) Jan IK; 52 wks 
Rosemary] M-F 1 1 : 15-noon; Jan 2: 52 wks 

Hi:; Sister; M-F; 1-1:15 pm; Jan 2: 52 wk« 

Ma Perkins; M-F 1:15-30 pm : Jan 2: 52 wks 

Young Dr. Malone; M-l 1:30-45 pm; Jan 2: 52 %.k. 

Guiding Light; M-F 1:45-2 pm; Jan 2; 52 sk. 

Brighter Day; M-l 2:45-3 pm; Jan 2; 52 wks 

Gabriel Heatter; W 7:30-45 pm; Jan I 

Sunoco Three Star Extra; M-F 6:45*7 pm: Jan 16; 52 wks 

C.ive * Take: Sat 1 :30-2 pm; Dec 31: 52 wks 

Man Next Door; Sal 8:30-'» pm; J.in 7 

M niiii Kane Private Eye; Su 4:30-5 pm ; Jan 1 



National Broadcast Sales Executives <p««onnei changes) 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Boger Baker 
Boherl F. Chapman 

Sam Cook Dlgges 
Alfred J. Harding 

Sheldon B. Hirkox. J 
John Paul Lee 
Norman l.on\ an 
Carl Ward 
limr Wilkev 



WKBW. Buffalo, comml mgr 

The Dallj Oklahoma:! & Oklahoma CilJ Time 

nail adi depl 
i Its Radio Sales-Television! N.Y.. acct exec 
WCCO, M'npls, St. Paul. -I- mgr 

Mts. \.l., mgr of .in rel depl < \M A TV) 

Special radio .). work in ir\.i. 

KRON-FM, S| comml rep 

WCCO. M'npls, St. Paul, sis -lafr member 

WCCO. M'npls, St. Paul, SSSl gen sis mgr .< pr. 

gram dir 



Sam,-. :i»i to presidenl 

tt kV Oklahoma City, comml mgr 

Sam,-. < hi. office, mur of t% 
l\ taff ..I Ills Badio Sale.. Rndio A IV Station. - Rcprc.cn- 

latlve, acct exec 
Mti N.Y., .lie ..f i- .in rel depl 
KMAC, Kiss, 5 Bn intonio, romml mcr 
KRON-TV, S.F., .1- mgr 
Same, aasl -1- mgr 

Same, gen .1. mgr 



• fn next issue: l\ew \ational Spot Business; Yen- onrf Kenetreri on Television; 
Station Representation CIioiihcn; Advertising Ic/ciici/ Personnel Chanaes 



wmmt 



■Ill 

till 






: 



: 






• 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



John It. Ulen 
Howard It. Bloomqu 
Julia Iverson Cowle 

Robert II. Davidson 



George I . Durum 

( ,-< il W I .irr.ir 

Lewis Cruber 
Juhn C. Gnardiola 

Frank l(. Hale 
I arrj I . Hard) 

I. W. Ilar.lv 

Frank Hopewell 
David V Jones 
Man Kayes 
NX i. liam II. Kingslej 
I . It. Mahonej 
M. I. Nelson 
Bernard J. Oot 
Richard D. rail.,, 
< lyde I . Rapp 
Banning Reppelier 
Frank A. Srhotters 

Itav nd h. S.-rfass 

(....rc.- II Smith 
Morris It. Stanley 
Neele I-!. Stearns 

li. , I,. , i S. \» aters 



I .mi Co. Chi., a.lv lour 
Textron Inc, N.Y., .lir of fashion i • u I • I 

Jell-O divisi.,,, ..I General Foods, N.Y., ,.~i lo dis- 
tribution planning mgr in the Genera] Foods 
Sales Division 

Dancer.Fitzgerald-Sample, N.Y.. tnedia .lir 

Richmond Products, N.Y .. <lir of sis prom 

P. Lorillard Co, \.\., -I- mgr 

Phillips Petroleum Co, Bartlesville, Okla.. as*i mgr 

pub r. I 
( unnlngham Drug M.,r» Inc, Detroit, prom ni^r 
I'hil.o Corp. ri.il... irp ..I Iv-radio .Ii> 

Murray Corp ..I America, Detroit 
P. Lorillard Co, N.Y., M , in charge of sis 
'.rant advertising, N.Y., vp 
lt( \ \ ictor, I amden, N.J.. p. .1.1 mgr 
Ideal Electric & Mfg «... N.Y., district manager 
Iti.l. ,... ,n.l Radiator Co, N.Y., genl factor) mgr 
I . S. Steel Corp. N.Y., mgr ..f exhibits 
Liquid Carbonic Corp. Chi., asst ...I. «>>^r 
Richmond Radiator Co, N.Y., a.lv .lir 
I W alter Thompson, N.Y. 
Lionel Corp. N.Y .. asst a.lv mgr 

Trailmobile Co, Cincinnati, vp in charge »,f opera- 
tions 
York Corp. York, Pa., industrial sis mgr of North 

Atlantic district 
Footc, Ion,- iV Belding, N.Y., acct exec 

I. .la. ..I Steel Products Co, Milwaukee, asst genl sis 

mgr ,»l parent linn in Chi. 
Kresge Ih-pl Store. Newark, vp and sis mgr 



Lever Brothers, N.Y., n mgr 

Lever Brothers, N.Y., a.lv mgr for a group of brands 

Monroe F, Dreher, N.Y., put. I and merchandising for several 

accounts 
Same, a>.i a.lv mgr of lello-O division 



Lever Brothers, V... media .lir 

Itirlim.in.l ita.liator Co, N.Y., vp and gen mgr sis 

P. Lorillard Co, N.Y., genl sis mgr 

II.. Weatherhead Co, Clove., dir pub rel 

Bristol M,,r. (... N.Y., .lir of a new merchandising dept 

Same, pres <»l tv-radio <liv 

Same (Scranton), vp in ,-harge of home appliance .liv 

Same, vp of newly-created .-igar div 

II.,, ,1.1 III. I. l.ar. I Ayer Inc, N.Y., a.lv mgr 

Same, comml mgr of Rod Seal Records 

Fairbanks, Morse c. Co, I lii.. bIs mgr electrical division 

Same, vp 

De Horn Displays. Cleveland, vp 

Sa adv iii^r 

<.r.i> Mfg < ... Hartford, ad* dir 

Theo. M.ii.im Brewing Co, St. Paul. a<J\ <lir 

\. * . Gilbert, New Haven, a<lv «S. >1> prom mgr 

Reynolds Metals < ". Louisville, operations mgr of parts <li 

Same, asst genl sis mgr 

Lever Brothers. N.V., ad> m^r for a group of brands 
Victor ('I'm- mical W nrks < hi., dir of sis 
Same, exec * |> 

The Dayton Rubber Co, Dayton, vp and dir of products 



New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or servicel 



AGENCY 



V merit' 



lea .V. Coffe 
tobacco Co. 



N.1 

Mi.l.i 



Argus Inc, Ann Arb. 

Vskel < ... Stamford, Conn. 

\ r v. . 1 1 In.-. Waukegan, Illinois 

Bib i orp, Lakeland, I la. 

Blaw-Knox < .... Pittsb. 

The Borden Co, N.Y . 

I .., w arner Corp, Detroit 

Bristol-Myera I I anada Ltd, I ..rout.. 

dill.. Fruit * Preserving Co, Little River, I la. 

< ore Inc, N 1 

I rown Poullrj Co, < "I bla, S I 

Drake America Corp. N.Y. 

Eclipse Food Products Inc, Providence 
Cvan- Case I.,. North Attleboro, Mai 

I red I ear & < ... Hr....klv ., 

(.art. >ii Toj C<». Sheboygan, Wis.-. 

Giola Macaroni Co, Ituffal.. 

Glycol l.ciieralor Chemical \ir Purification < orp. Chi. 

i.n Bakeries, N.Y. 

II. \X . Cssar.l Co. Chicago 

J. I). Jewell Inc, Gainesville, I. a. 

Kanncnglesser A ' ,.. N.l 

J. Langrall & Brother, Baltimore 

LaPlaya Products In.-, N Y 

Leacock & < .. Inc, N.1 

I ever Brothers, NY 

I ever Brothers, NY 

I loyd Mfg. < ... Menominee, Ml. I. 

\\ alter Magulre < ... N Y 

Mail Pou. I. robi < ... Wheeling, W \ .. 

Market I ,.rt-.- < ... Everett, Ma 
Ma ■>,,,,. I orp, (lii. 
David Michael A < o Inc, Phila. 
Mall. >- Inc, Seattle 

I' I A ,.,,,,1.1. I .,. < ,,,, ,,,,,.,,, 

Robert Reis £ < ... N.I 

Renault . I ranee 

It. ,,,,,,, M„„,,. Products I ,.. Phila. 

Itik.r. Inc, N N 

II,, Rob. m I, . hni< .1 8 I rade Scl N 1 

It, .s, 11,1. 1 Packing i a Ut ,la. Calif. 

Srhwarz Saunagc Co, s .l 

M i. Shav. > ■■ N.I 

II,. S.S 9. I ,,. Atlanta, "... 

Standard \ I, W ...k VY 

I o] I'.,,, I II. .11,- I. I . \ 

I rlumph II,. ,, , > M Vork, Pa 

W r.| Hi. ( .. - I 



"American lee" . ,,IT.-.- 
I.uckv Strike Cigarettes 

(Television advertising) 
Cameras and optical equipment 
Proprlet arj medicines 
Sanitation engineers 
Orange juice 
Clamshell bucket .liv 

< hemlcal division 
Norge division 
Resist ab 

Jams ami jellies 

( ostumo j.-w.-lrv 
l'oi.ltrv 

International trading compsn) 

(candy ami food .liv a.lv I 
Coffee and fruil svrups 
Jewelrj 
Vanilla extract 

Macaroni products 

Vir purili.'rs 

Pre-baked roll- and bread 

Foundation garments 

i rv Ing chicken 

Delicacies 

< anned I Is 

Hair ...lor blenders 

Pcpsodcnl t I, i lei 

Rayve -I,, 

Outdoor furniture manufacturer 
Flooring 

I., I,. ro.lu.ts 

si.- .., I. pressure cooker 

Hull. lit,- mat, rials 

\ ,,,ill.i products 

Food products 

Special advertising project 

I nderv. ear & Pa ,.,,,,., 

\ biles 

sp,,i removers 
Restaurant chain 
Trade schools 
Sklppj Pel i Butler 

•s.,1, .tl^l-s 

v, Inc and whiskej Importers 

SSS I, ,ui. 

M I act urers 

rolklng i", 
Stockings 

< anned lea I I 



Mm, in & Gwynn, Memphis 

l.ltliv«.<». IVY! 

Fletcher II. Richards Inc, N.Y. 

Sej ur Blum, N.1 . 

Schoenfeld, Huber & Green, Chi. 

Charles \V. H..vt. V> . 

Russell I. Gray Inc, Chi. 

James I li,,iiia> Chirurg, N.Y'. 

Duane Jones Co Inc, N.l . 

Kcnyon & I < kl.ar.lt ltd. I oronto 

Newman, Lynde v\ Associates, Jackso 

I la. 

t harles Jay Co Ine, N.Y. 

\\ alter J. Klein Co. Charlotte, N < 

II. It. LeQuatte Inc, N.Y. 

Joseph Maxfield, Providence 

McNeill A McCleery, ll>« I. Calif. 

Peter Hilton Inc. N.Y. 
Schoenfeld, Under & Green, < hi, 
Storm. Rochester 

Morris F, Sv.amv In.-. Chi 

I ester I . W ..Iff Inc, N.Y. 
W.i-s .»; Geller Inc, Chi. 
i i .,„ ford & Porter, \ilania 
Paris K I'.art. N > 

Moses, Itallilliore 
I. rant. N ^ 
John V. Cairns ,vl Co. \ ^ 

Footc, Cone & Belding, N I 

J. Walter Thorn N ^ 

I harles \\ . Hoyt, N.Y 
<>. s Tyson & «... N.l 
( harles H . Hoyt < ... N ^ 
Cor) Snow In.-. Boston 

I I,. I ,,. hen I o, Chi. 

(drian Bauer, Phila. 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Seattle 

I ... Burnett < o Inc, Chi. 

I ,,.,,, w ,s. , A < ... \,1 . 

Smith, S,,,.,ll.-v .\ roster Ine, N.l . 

McKec & All. riuht. Phila. 

William Warren, Jackson A l». v. 

Willi..... Warren, .larks,,,, ,\ It. I 

< Bast A Bonfigll 

Phil \ .,,. Slyck, s.l . 

Ml, v .V Hi. hard- I,,, N 1 

ll.-nrv J. Kaufman Associates, Washl 
I ,., . ,,,., < „ Ine, N > 
Buchanan & Co. 1 . \ 

It. II. I, ,1a I ,,. VI 
W. ,|. Mar, in i- Ine, S I 



N \ 

N.Y. 




-: : 






m 



*;•;•'■: ; 






FRANK BOON presents the WHK 6:00 P.M. NEWS to his many devoted listeners 
in a direct, comprehensive, understandable style. His public acceptance guarantees 
advertisers the best cost-per-thousand in Cleveland... 



COMPARE 



COST PER THOUSAND HOMES 

6:00 - 6:10 P. M MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 

FOR CLEVELAND REGIONAL NETWORK STATIONS 



HOOPERATING 
AVERAGE 

HOMES 
PRIMARY AREA 

HOMES 

REACHED 

DAILY 

COST FOR 

10 MINUTE 

PROGRAM 

MAX DISCOUNT) 

COST PER 

1000 

HOMES 




5.3 

952,244 

50,469 
560.75 



51.18 



6.2 
874,385 

54.212 

591.13 



51.68 



5.1 
705393 

35,975 
572.04 



52.00 



AVAILABLE M.-W.-F.-see your ra ymer 

REPRESENTATIVE ABOUT THE 6:00 PM NEWS 



Hooper -Fall-Tinier < I 

Winter-Spring 48-40 



® Rased on coverage patterns on file with tht 

and /tomes. Sales Wnnaeemrtt Suriev ><l flu* 
ing I'^er 1949 

T' Projected rating for primary area 



16 JANUARY 1950 



15 




2 Siipor Salesmen 

Bellowing 

Bowlegged 

Boy 

Biff Collie 

& Ken Grant- 



on the 7:45 p.m. to 8 p.m., 
Monday through Friday seg- 
ment of KNUZ's Houston 
Hoedown. 



Consistently high Hoopers 
prove that this is the show 
with the western punch, as 
well as pull, in Houston's 
fabulous market. You pay day- 
time rates for a high Hooper- 
rated nighttime audience. 



Here's Your Share 
Of Audience . . . 



MONDAY 




4.8 


TUESDAY 




5.0 


WEDNESDAY 




4.4 


THURSDAY 




4.6 


FRIDAY 




3.6 


SOURCE: 






Hooper Report May 


-Sept., 1949 



KNUZ salu'es fhe Port of Houston, 
3rd Largest Port in the United States 

K-nuz 



Call, Wire or Write 

Dave Morris, Mgr. 

Forjoc, Nat. Rep. 

CE. 8801 

9th Floor, Scanlon Bldg. 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 




3/r. Sponsor 



Walter S. Mack, Jr. 

President 
Pepsi-Cola Company, New York 



When Pepsi-Cola president Walter S. Mack. Jr. took over active 
control of the company in 1939. Pepsi was not hitting the spot. The 
firm. whi<h was purchased from rcteivcrs for Si 2.000 in 1931 had 
not made any important progress. Mack, an accomplished business- 
man with impressive credentials, came to Pepsi determined to over- 
take Coca-Cola's lead in the soft drink industry. The company's 
productivity was increased and a new bottle and labels were de- 
signed. Pepsi's annual ad budget, which was upped to $600,000 that 
year, looked puny compared to Coca-Cola's $15,000,000. The same 
year, Pepsi's singing commercial (Pepsi-Cola hits the spot, etc.), 
which was the first to win the admiration of advertising men and the 
favor of the nation, was placed on the air. The chase was on. 

By 1 ( H7. Mack's campaign to overtake Coca-Cola showed some 
results. The companv's annual ad budget had jumped to $4,500,000, 
of which $2,200,000 was used for radio and newspapers. Everess, 
the firms sparkling water product marketed two years before was 
a growing success. Mack's decision to keep the 12 ounce bottle and 
embarrass competitors into explaining their smaller portion-, had 
proved a definite -ales aid. Pepsi moved to the number two position 
in the soft drink industrj . 

The 54 year old Harvard alumnus has made a habit of su< ess. 
In \ ( )\'). after serving two years as a naval ensign in World War I. 
Mack joined Bedford Mill- as a salesman. Seven years later he was 
president of the concern. Then, he became Chairman of the Hoard 
and Director of the I nited Cigar-Whelan Stores Corporation. Two 
veil- after he was defeated as the Republican candidate For the 
\ew ^loik State Senate, 1931. he was the \icc-pre-idenl of the 
Phoenix Securities Compan) : three years later he headed the firm. 

Last ve ii M.k k losl some ground in his race to catch up to Coca- 
Cola. Pepsi's president hired New York City's Town Hal] to tell his 
stockholders thai the company's nel income had dropped $3,769,834 
m I'M::, and it- first quarter sales Eoi 1949 were below those of the 
same period in L948. Said M.k k justifying his $104,000 annual 
salary, "Good executives don't come a dime a do/en." 



16 



SPONSOR 



EDDIE CHASE and his 



Tele**** GoJg* S fco* 

i ? P -^ C^. r d ;. SC ordet g£ 

to rougW * gicia^s ^ t f ser 

eX cV!anges dca stot ^ Ed 

, -rhe a va ?r e ^JlaV^e Ben wVv icb ^* 
r*v,«se on * c v .. se d car V, a ^.Dodd.s 

and parted at ^f eC f answer- 

,^eteleP^ n C *ethird* a &als 

Jtbe Pi cture SoW **%]* sales 
K serv^ ^rde^^a change 

1 5S*J • ?ndV U progr d arn *fg£ 
'^an end * «*? eW ed p ; a ced 
or a +p\eP^° ne T rails ^ er( T *ut of 

Ranges. ^^^- 



MAKE BELIEVE BALLROOM 



=RADIO DAILY- 

Thursday. December 8, 1949 




middle -of -the -dial 
at 800 kc. 



Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 
National Representative 

GUARDIAN BUILDING • DETROIT 26 

THE 50,000 WATT GOOD NEIGHBOR STATION • MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
16 JANUARY 1950 



17 



9 Hometown 
Stations^ 



KBON £ 9 L 
KOLM 12L 

offers you 
coverage of 

Population 674,500 

Families 200,000 

Radio Homes 172,880 

with an 

Effective 

Buying Income 

of 

$1,071,583,000 



Coverage 



New development s on SPONSOR stories 



Equal to 



of the 



60% Buying Power 



of the 



SI % Radio Homes 



of the 

ENTIRE STATE 
OF NEBRASKA 



KOLN/^ 

Paul R. Fry, Gen. Mgr. 

World Insurance Bldg., Omaha, Nebr. 

Natl. Rep: RA-TEL, Inc. 



p.s 



jG6 ! ''What makes a TV program click?' 
IsSlie: 22 September 1949, p. 64 
Subject: Television programing 



When the National Brewing Company started using television two 
years ago, the organization had to find its own program line-up. 
which would sell beer effectively. The medium was new and Na- 
tional Brewing was a pioneer sponsor. At the outset the company 
sponsored all available sporting events over WMAL-TV, Baltimore. 
However, sporting events proved to be hit and miss affairs. The\ 
were seasonal, and therefore did not afford the company an oppor- 
tunity to develop strong viewer patterns, or a loyal, growing video 
audience. When sport programs became highly-prized TV attrac- 
tions, they also became financially undesirable. 

National Brewing began looking for other t\ pes of programing. 
After carefully studying various formats, the company started a half- 
hour show. The National Amateur Hour. The grand finalist, selected 
after six weeks of competition, was guaranteed a spot on the network 
program. The Original Amateur Hour. National Brewing then added 
the sponsorship of the professional wrestling matches in Baltimore, 
and a combination sports and variety videocast. The National Sports 
Parable. Monday-Saturday. The program was slanted to interest men 
at public places and women at home. By this time the company was 
sponsoring a minimum of eight and a half hours of TV programing 
a week. 

Willi sales mounting as a result of its extensive use of television, 
the organization began microwaving its top attraction. The National 
Sports Parade, to Washington. D. C. To round out a full eight and 
a half hour TV schedule for the nation's capitol, "National Brewing 
beamed in the professional wrestling matches From New ^ ork, han- 
dled by the veteran video sportscaster Dennis James. Executives at 
National Brewing noted that during the past two years the outfit has 
expanded faster than at any other time in its history. It was during 
this period that the compam used television as its major advertising 
medium. In 1950. National Brewing will spend 20'. of its $1,000.- 
000 annual ad budget for TV. 



p.S 



See: "Who listens to FM?" 
IsSUe: March 1948, p. 29 
Subject: FM listening in Washington, D. C. 



A special survcv conducted 1>\ the National Association oi Broad- 
casters revealed that a total of 51.282 families comprising 179,487 
persons listen eonsistentl) to I'M radio in the metropolitan district 
of Washington. I). ('. 

Of the 102.200 who tunc in to I'M programs on an average da} 
in metropolitan Washington. !!7.2'« consider KM reception worth 
the additional cost. Listening time For the average dailj audience 
is approximately 106 minutes a day. In thi> comprehensive survey, 
prepared l>\ \nhui Stringer, \ \l> staff director who is secretarj ol 
the NAB's Executive Committee, extensive use was made of diarj 
stud) and interview techniques. 

Although I'M broadcasting has gained an impressive Foothold in 
the nation's capital, the plight of I'M radio in the resl <>l the country 
is verj discouraging. In New ^ ork. W M(! \-l-M planned to suspend 
operation of it- I'M affiliate claiming that the station had an insig- 
nificant listening audience, in addition to losing MOOD a month. 



18 



SPONSOR 




What about the market? Philadelphia is the third city in the U. S. And 

it's second in number of television receivers (TV audience has nearly trebled 
since February, 1949). 

What about Station? Take WCAU-TV. Transmitter located at the hub of 
the market. Strongest signal and best picture in the center of population. 

What about program ? Again take WCAU-TV. Latest Telepulse gives 
WCAU 8 of top 10 daytime shows, 3 of top 5 nighttime shows, and 5 of the top 10 
local shows. 

To get in the picture in Philadelphia, get on WCAU-TV. 



WCAU 



CBS AFFILIATE 



^y 



^ AM 
TV 

FM 



The Philadelphia Bulletin Stations 



16 JANUARY 1950 



19 




2C 



SPONSOR 



i I 



lis 





NBC IS DOUBLY PROUD OF "HALLS OF IVY": FIRST, ITS STARS RONALD COLMAN, BONITA HUME; SECOND, ITS SPONSOR, SCHLITZ 



Packaging returns 
to the networks 



Luig'i and >l> Friend Irinn 
have proved what ean be done. All four 
chains plan in do more 



16 JANUARY 1950 



^^_ j Network salesmanship, en- 
Wy tcring 1950 as the \ear of 
^^^^> toughest competition sin< e 
< r\stal-.-el da\s. is now in the hands "I 
broadcasting's biggest brass. But 
what's more important to the buyer — 
the sponsor, the client, or the advertis- 
ing ajieucx is this: the networks real- 
ty have something to sell. Thai some- 
thing is the network developed pack- 
age program a program owned oi at 

least controlled I>\ the network. 

In 1950, the package program will 
probabty be the biggest bargain bnj 
on the networks. 

That fact w ill hold li ue whether the 
salesman is Columbia's I » i 1 1 Paley, who 
was Largety responsible foi starting tin- 
new network packaging trend, or one 
of Pale) 's competitoi s. I i ank W hite 
of Mutual, trained in Paley's own 
-hop. has taken a leaf OUl of the I BS 

hook of packaging experien< ■. Niles 



21 



These three net paekuges ure sponsored 




liaminell. freed of NBC presidential 
dutio so that he can be a super-sales- 
man as chairman of the hoard, has his 
own carton of packages. The same is 
true of Mark Woods, whom ABC has 
ju-t relieved of administrative duties 
s<> that he might concentrate on sell- 
ing as vice-chairman of the network 
board. 

1 he trend toward network produced 
packages is reall) a postwar phenome- 
non. But it is also a return to network 
responsibility for their own major 
shows. 

Radio packaging ha- gone through 
three stages. In the begining, when 
radio was new. onl) the networks 
bothered with the creation of pro- 
grams. No one else would touch that 
expensive game. After a while, when 

NORWICH PHARMACAL has sponsored "The Fat Man" on ABC ever since February, 1947 advertisers found that radio was worth- 

while, the) asked their advertising 
agencies to find suitable programs. 

I he agencies discovered there were not 
enough shows in the network show- 
cases to suil the client's needs or fan- 
cies. Being enterprising, the agencies 
started packaging programs for their 
clients. Independent packagers also 
got into the business. It was a profit- 
able business for everybody concerned, 
and the networks really didn't care if 
the agencies took over the headaches 
and the initial expenses of building 
-hows. I he networks were interested 
in selling time -and. in a seller's mar- 
ket, they could afford to let someone 
else do the program building. 

Those were the days, incidentally, 
when longhair critics of radio includ- 
ing some at the FCC — howled against 
the practice of letting advertising agen- 
cies do most of the program-building. 

Vmusingl) enough, however, sonic of 
these adverse critics are far behind the 
parade now. Onlv last month, former 
FCC Chairman James Laurence FIv 
delivered a speech in which he pulled 
old figures out of the hat. showing that 
advertising agencies control programs. 
I nforlunalelv . Fly had not looked at 
programing recentl) with sufficient 
care. I he fact is that the program- 
building function i-. once more, in the 
hands of the network-. And the agen- 
cies are happ\ about the development. 
The modern trend in packaging dates 
back to a meeting held in the offices of 
Bill Palej shortl) after the big boss <>f 
CBS returned from his war chores. 

CBS" schedule had been virtually 
broken apart. It had lost Fred Mien. 

Burn- & Mien, Bing Crosby, Duffy's 

PHILIP MORRIS is the current sponsor of Mutual-developed package, ' Oueen lor a Day" Tavern. Life of Riley, I he Mil Parade, 




22 



SPONSOR 




1 1 JJ 




Rr V 




'5b^^^_^^^ J 





NETWORK PACKAGE SALESMEN: MARK WOODS, ABC; WILLIAM PALEY, CBS; FRANK WHITE, MUTUAL; NILES TRAMMELL, NBC 



and other programs and stars. 

Palev laid down the law. Willi the 
help of psychologist Frank Stanton. 
alread\ on the way from academic re- 
search to the CBS presidency. Pale) 
worked out thre? principles for bol- 
stering his network's position. Here — 
for the first time in print — are those 
principles: 

1. Control 

2. Content 

3. Competition 

Just what those words meant was a 
mystery to the CBS staff. But the veil 
was lifted h\ I'ale\. fast. In effect, his 
lecture went something like this: 

"We've lost control of the situation. 
We must regain control. How do we 
do this? B\ insuring program content. 
That means, we'll build our own shows 
— regardless of costs. Then we 11 be 
in position to hit hard on the third 
principle: competition." 



The word went out, down the CBS 
lines. Pale) himself took hold of pro- 
graming. Did it |>av off? Here are 
two examples: 

I'll "M\ Friend Irma." It went on 
the air April 11, 1047. Cost: $3,500 
a week, \ttci 16 weeks, "Irma" was 
sold. Investment in sustaining "Irma : 
s .">(>. 000. Gross income now from 
time-sale for "Irma": $688,000 per 
\ear. 

(2) "Life With Luigi." On the air 
as a sustainer from September. 194<"> 
to January, 1950, at $3,500 a week. 
Total cost as sustainer, including spe- 
cial promotion, about $2( 10.000. Gross 
income from future time sales: at least 
$688,000 a year. 

The other networks were not asleep. 
\drian Samish was \BC's programing 
vice-president, and Bob Kintner had 
just assumed responsibility as execu- 
ti\e vice-president, a job which trained 



him for the presidency which he holds 

now . 

Between Kintner and Samish, \B( 
started working out it- own packaging 
ideas. This network had already had 
some experience with packages. Their 
was "Ladies Be Seated" which started 
in June 1943 and >ta\ed as a sustainer 
for about two years. It wasn't an ex- 
pensive show, cost onlj about $150,000 
for the two-year period. But when the 
sustaining period was over, "Ladies 
started to pa\ off in sponsorship which 
lasted almost four straight years, from 
June. 1945 to March. 1949. 

Samish and kintner put other shows 
into the works on their own. One of 
these was "The Fat Man." For a lit- 
tle over a year, this one rolled along 
without a sale. It set the network 
back a total of $125,000. But Norwich 
Pharmacal took up "Fat Man" in Feb- 
i Please turn to page 58) 



Luigi: From Cradle ta Rare 

1. BIRTH: Cy Howard, having clicked with "My Friend Irma," 
gets another idea in spring of 1948, decides to build a pro- 
gram around a warm-hearted little Italian immigrant. Locale: 
Chicago. Tentative title: "The Little Immigrant." 

2. DEVELOPMENT: Howard feels he should know more about 
his immigrant's background, spends ;ummer of 1948 in Italy. 

3. AUDITION: CBS cuts platter of Howard show, Augu?t 
1948. 

4. SUSTAINING: Show goes on air, September I, 1948. 
Hooperating starts from scratch. December 1949 — Hoop- 
erating has gone up to 11.5. 

5. SPONSORSHIP: After network has spent about $200,000 
on program, it gets sponsor, Wrigley's Gum, January 10 
1950. Cost of talent to sponsor: $3,500 a week. 

16 JANUARY 1950 



Tiro of Nielsen tap four are paekaues 



Program 
Lux Radio Theater 
Godfrey's Talent Scouts 

Jack Benny 

My Friend Irma 

Mystery Treater 

Fibber McGee and Molly 

Charlie McCarthy 

Day in the Life of Dennis Day 

People Are Funny 

Walter Winchell 

Amos V Andy 

Bob Hope 

Inner Sanctum 

Mr. District Attorney 



Rank 
Year Ago 

I 
3 

8 
6 

10 

4 
16 
20 
I I 

2 
17 

5 
13 

9 



Rank 

This Repct 

I 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
I I 
15 
18 
19 

23 




These lucky ladies won their "Chance of a Lifetime" on the Bretton radio show — a luxury cruise 



The way back 

S|M'i<l«-l blazed llio watrb band 
advertising trail bill friendly competitor 
II ret ton caught on fast 



W Among those who snick- 

, «%^pflp^ ered when the Speidel 
Corp. decided to try selling watchbands 
l>\ radio, in the spring of 1948, was 
Speidel's biggest rival. Bruner-Ritter, 
Inc. Saul Ritter, president of the latter 
firm, freel) admits that he shared in 
the majority pre-broadcasl opinion: 
Speidel was off its rocker. 

Ritter and Marvin Brunei, the com- 
pany's vice president, were as wrong 
as everyone else — and as surprised — 
when Speidel's participation in Stop 
the Music on ABC turned out to be a 
phenomenal success. I sponsor, 28 Feb. 
1949.) The fact that Stop the Music 
increased the sale of Speidel watch- 
bands by more than 25'< provoked 
much deep and sober thought in the 
Bruner-Ritter camp. 

Two obvious conclusions offered 
themselves: (a I Speidel's pioneering 
plunge into radio had proved that it is 
possible to create brand-name con- 
sciousness about a watchband; < 1» i 
radio was far and away the best me- 
dium For selling watchbands by brand- 
name. 

Bruner-Ritter Inc. was neither too 
proud nor too smug to borrow a leaf 
from the book of a competitor — even 
from a rival firm which it had once 
eclipsed as the leading manufacturer 
in its field. Bruner-Ritter held that 
distinction in the watchband world 
until the start of the recent war. Some 
time before the U. S. began hostilities, 
the compan) converted most of its fac- 
|or\ facilities in Bridgeport, Hartford, 
and Montreal to munitions production. 
As a result. Bruner-Ritter had to relin- 
quish its dominance of one vital part 
of the watchband business that of 
supplying new bands to wholesalers for 
over-the-counter sales and repair-re- 
placements. The company retained. 
however, its preeminence in the other 
important segment of the industry- 
supplying bands to the major watch 
manufacturers, such as Bulova. Cruen. 
and so on. 

With the advent of peace and recon- 
version of industrv to civilian produc- 
tion. Bruner-Ritter was faced, along 
with thousands of other manufacturers. 
with the problem of regaining its posi- 
tion in a fast-moving, highly-competi- 
tive field. In their case, the problem 
was bow best to recapture Bruner- 
Ritter's pre-wai leadership in the over- 
the-counter sale of watchbands. 

Deciding on an orthodox approach, 
the compan) turned to the consumer 



24 



SPONSOR 



BUSINESS FORECAST 

Smooth toiling ohrod 
for |eweleri who lie in 

with this 
"(honee of a Lifetime' 



Tlie lti« linn It ci i«d 




Vol I. .V 



( Hl( U.<>. Ill II I "i !5. 1949 



• • • • • 



JEWELERS HAIL 

LIFETIME 

Bretton "Bets Million" New 
Plan Doubles Jeweler Traffic! 

MOKI PEOPL1 buj watch bands than any other 
single item in jewelry stores! Any plan that doubles 
watch band tr.it tie . doubles retailer opportunities to 

sell higher-priced watches, rings, silverware — 
ever) thing! 

This is the basii principle behind the s|iectacular 
new Bretton plan acclaimed by jewelers who pre 



CHANC 





BRUNER-RITTER FOLLOWED THROUGH ON RADIO WITH DYNAMIC PROMOTIONS WHICH BUILT DEALER INTEREST TO NEW PEAK 



magazines in a effort to hypo sales of 
its "Bretton" line of watchbands. I The 
Bretton line today includes more than 
60 styles of metal watchbands and 
bracelets, in a $3.95-$59.95 price 
range. I Saul Ritter and Marvin Bruner 
hopefully invested between $250,000 
and $300,000 for full-page spreads in 
newspapers and such national maga- 
zines as the Saturday Evening Post and 
Life, and alerted their dealers to stand 
by for the rush of customers. 

The stampede started by the ads 
would easily have overflowed a phone 
booth. Bruner and Ritter recall sadly. 
Hie ads were beautiful, the copy crisp 
and apparently compelling — but it was 



just so much money down the drain. 

By this time the Speidel people had 
launched their now-historic radio cam- 
paign over ABC, and the scoffers in 
the jewelry business were beginning to 
sit up and take notice. For the first 
time in the memory of the oldest 
watchband men. customers were ask- 
ing for the product by name — not for 
just a watchband but for a Speidel 
band, "the one they told about on 
Stop the Music." 

With complete frankness, Brunei 
and Ritter admit that they got into 
radio principally because Speidel 
forced them into it — that is. because 
the competitive pressure wouldn't per- 



mit them to stand idh by. Bruner and 
Ritter were convinced at the same time 
that Speidel's spectacular success with 
radio represented only a surface- 
scratching of the potential watchband 
market. 

They felt, that is. that the watchband 
capacity of the nation was many times 
greater than any one had imagined. 
Bruner and Ritter agreed with Speidel 
that the way to sell more watchbands 
was to make people conscious of them 
as something more than a link between 
watch and wrist. Jewelers themselves 
have been selling watchbands for vears 
by the simple expedient of polishing 
i Please turn to page 60) 




WHEN "CHANCE OF A LIFETIME" IS ROAD-SHOWN. BRETTON MISSES NO BETS. WDSU HELPED PLENTY IN NEW ORLEANS 

16 JANUARY 1950 25 



II II II works 




Herewith a report 

on a radio measurement 
that everybody likes 



over-all 




7 e f Jur questions we es!; are: ( I ) Who is 
the owner of the station — is his operation 
successful — and what typo of personnel does 
he employ? (2) What attention is paid to 
programming? (3) What are the pro- 
gramme popularity ratings? (4) What is 
the actual station coverage as shown by 
BBM? It is our feeling that the time will 
soon arrive when any station not in a posi- 
tion to supply BBM information will run the 
risk of not being included in the list of 
stations carrying our programmes. 

HAROLD E. STEPHENSON, 

Advertising Manager. 
The (Canada Starch Co. Ltd. 




BBM gives essential information we can get 
in no other way. BBM figures are confirmed 
by our own survey among users of our p-od- 
ucts. BBM surveys reach residents of room- 
ing houses who have radios, but no individ- 
ual telephones; they cover village and rural 
residents not reached by co-incidental tele- 
phone surveys. 

GILBERT TEMPLETON, 

General Manager, 
Templetons Limited 



26 



Canada ma\ be "different." 

But the fact remains that, 
while plans have been completed for 
the formal wind-up of the affairs of the 
Broadcast Measurement Bureau in 
this countn on 31 December — after a 
strife-ridden five-year career — Cana- 
da's older and parallel Bureau of 
Broadcast Measurement never \\a> 
more alive. 

BBM is all set to undertake in L950 
its fourth biennial study. As in BMB"s 
Study No. 2. now being released, BBM 
will report for the first time not onl) 
once-a-week but six-and-seven times, 
three-four-and-five times, and one-and- 
two times a week listening. The quota 
will be 90.000 ballots. This sample 
means more than one ballot for every 
40 of a total of some 3,147,000 radio 
homes in the Dominion. 

Like BMB. BBM is a cooperative, 
tripartite organization engaged in mea- 
suring radio station coverage. Direct- 
id |<iinll\ i three ivpresenlath es from 
each i b\ Association of Canadian Ad- 
vertisers. Canadian Association of Ad- 
vertising Agencies and Canadian Asso- 
ciation of Broadcasters, it is financed, 
as is BMB. almost entireb 1>\ the 
broadcasters. 

BBM was initialed b) the Canadian 
broadcasters al their annual meeting in 
l''12. Thej suggested the formation 
ill a tripartite committee to stud) cur- 
rent method.- of measuring radio cover- 
age. \s in the I nilcil Stales, some sta- 
tions were estimating coverage in terms 
ill mail count; others b) half-millivoll 
contour; still others 1>\ combinations 
of these and other projections. I he 
tripartite group set out to find a fair 

SPONSOR 



and uniform method for all Canadian 
stations. 

The first biennial BBM stud) un- 
made, in 1944. on the hasis of these 
seven criteria: 

"1. Impartial: It must not be con- 
trolled 1>\ interests who had something 
to sell, or something to be gained 1>\ 
publication of the results; 

"2. Simple: The results and data 
must be easily understood and easily 
used: 

"3. Flexible: The method musl al- 
low for future changes without affect- 
ing the value or usability of previous 
data and information: 

"4. Uniform: I he method mu>t li- 
the same for all stations, so that a unit 
of measurement applied to one station 
means exactly the same thing when 
applied to another: 

''5. Comparable: Data obtained 
must be comparable, not only station 
by station but also market l>\ market. 
as well as being comparable with other 
market facts and other media: 

"6. Accurate: The method must be 
accurate within the commercial limits 
of cost; 

"7. Practical: The job must be done 
in a reasonable time, at a reasonable 
cost, and by the people available." 

Ten methods were tested. Discarded 
promptly was the "arbitrarj circle" on 
a map. Mail analysis and analysis of 
stimulated mail were dropped because 
it was felt they measured specific pro- 
grams rather than station (overage. 
and because these could not pro\ ide na- 
tional comparative figures. Signal 
strength measurement told '"where the 
station could be heard — but not who 
listens" Audimeters and personal in- 
terviews were discarded because of the 
cost. Telephone surveys would "leave 
out the thousands of families who 
didn't have telephones." 

A postcard popularity poll method, 
by which the Dominion would have 
been saturated with cards asking re- 
cipients which stations they listen to 
most, was found unreliable for several 
reasons — but chiefly because "it en- 
deavors to combine a quantitative with 
a qualitative measurement. It scram- 
bles total numbers of listeners with 
each individual's conception of w hat 
constitutes his favorite station." 

The committee finally decided that a 
pre-tested controlled mail ballot came 
closest to meeting the requirements of 
all seven criteria. Earl) in 1944 it was 
officially endorsed by the AC A. C \ \ \ 
{Please turn to page 51 I 




The data supplied by the BBM in Canada 
provides our Marketing, Research and Ad- 
vertising Departments with a yardstick which 
helps to determine the approximate cover- 
age of any radio station subscribing to the 
BBM whether it is used for local pro- 
grammes, network programmes, or spot 
availabilities. Whilst having a number of 
limitations the service is still of definite 



slue. 



ROBIN E. MERRY, 

Group Marketing; Director, 
Lever Brothers Limited. 





To get the most for the least we must dis- 
tribute our advertising investment to meet 
the varying circumstances in all our differ- 
ent markets. We find BBM Audience Re- 
ports of definite value, not only in buying 
radio coverage, but in checking the ade- 
quacy of our advertising penetration in re- 
lation to sales targets. 

JOHN WHITEHEAD, 

Advertising Manager. 

Shirriffs Limited. 



In our opinion BBM ranks with rating serv- 
ices and other radio measurement devices 
from the standpoint of necessity. Every 
choice of stations reflects an examination of 
BBM data if it is available. To eliminate 
BBM would be similar to eliminating the 
automobile for a return to the horse and 
buggy. 

CARLTON W. HART. 

The Procter & Gamble Co. 
of Canada. Ltd. 



16 JANUARY 1950 



27 




LONELY PROGRAM: This is one of few airline-sponsored 15-min. shows 



FREE RIDE: American Airlines got plug from NBC's Banghart after trip 



Airlines on the air .. 



\s ceiling zero 



for many airline* in their use of broadcast advertising 



over-all 



Broadcasting is still a .small. 
hut a growing, factor in 
the promotion programs of most do- 
mestic airlines. It is attracting a high- 
er proportion of the score of scheduled 
airlines than of the l.'iS Class I rail- 
mad- im'ovsok. Januarv 2). 

Nearlv all of the airlines are "air- 
minded."" and most of them are now 
on the air. Hut too often these "cam- 
paigns" are only of short-term an- 
nouncements, "when \\c have some- 
thing special to talk about." 

One company, however Northeast 
\iilines reports that it is allocating 
.">()'; of its entire advertising budget 
to radio. Others including Colonial, 
Delia. National and Western arc ex- 
panding radio efforts. Several have 

pone into television. 

Hut collectively the airlines s'ill have 
no network program to parallel the 

Monda\ night "Kailioad Hour of the 
\ssociation of American Railroads. 
\ few years ago the \ir Transport 



Association, Washington, considered 
various ideas for a network show, to 
supplement or replace the $600,000-a- 
year campaign which ATA was run- 
ning in magazines through Erwin, 
Wasey & Co. Hut a short time after 
that the association's entire coopera- 
tive campaign was dropped. 

The biggest domestic operator. 
\mcrican Airlines, spends only 5 to 
Hi',' of its $l,000,000-plus advertis- 
ing budget for broadcasting, said J. A. 
Dearborn, advertising manager. "We 
have used only news annouueements 
when we've had a special story to tell 
— such as the "family half-fare" plan. 
Then American schedules (through 
Ruthrauff & Hyanl a total of 100 or 
more stations in 40 to .*>0 on-line cities. 
Such campaigns usually run only three 

or four weeks. \mcri< an may be hark 

in spot broadcasting in 1950, as such 
''special stories"' materialize. 

I nited Air lines was "the first air- 
line to use TV commercially — begin- 



ning in May. 1948." reported Robert 
E. Johnson, advertising director. "We 
plan to continue our present T\ cam- 
paign, which emphasizes 'dependabil- 
ity in a series of one-minute spots," 
through N. W. Ayer & Son. These 
announcements run five times weekly 
in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles 
and San Francisco. Although 1950 
plans had not been completed, "we 
may step up the intensity of our effort 
in the cities named, and possibly go 
into comparative fare advertising (air 
\-. rail I in Eastern cities." 

Mr. Johnson reported United's re- 
sults from TV as "satisfactory." 

For more than four vears I niteds 
lews bureau in Chicago has been send- 
ing to stations throughout the country 
a series of weekly scripts on "Aviation 
in the News. 

Another coast-to-coast operator. 
Northfesl Virlines, St. Haul, replied 
simply: "We are not using radio or 
telex ision at the present time." but 



28 



SPONSOR 



may start broadcasting, "to some ex- 
tent," during L950. 

One of the comparative old-timers in 
the use of radio advertising is Eastern 
Airlines. At present. Eastern is u-inv. 
radio on 37 stations in 17 cities — 
mainl) along Eastern air routes — new 
York, Florida, Chicago, Houston, Mew 
Oilcans and \tlanla. The "Silvei 
Fleet" is plugged via one-minute an- 
nouncements and 15-second station 
breaks with an average total of 240 
spots a week. Phis schedule will lie 
continued during 1050. 

On the video scene, Eastern is ex- 
perimenting with a five-tiines-a-week 
I5-minute live and film news program 
on WSB-TV. Should these prove suc- 
cessful. Eastern's TV advertising will 
expand during 1050. 



T\\ \ has '-taken to the air" with 
a radio and t\ spol campaign consist- 
ing i'l one-minute commercials ami 
station breaks. Their -pot radio cam- 
paign will i over 12-11 cities I prin- 
cipally those alon their air route-' 
From \eu ^ oik to San I i ancisco and 
Los Angeles. 

TWA's television plans for the com- 
ing \eai call lor one-minute -pots and 
station breaks on New N ork and Chi- 
i ago station-. 

Northeast \irlines. Inc., Boston, has 
realK tried to lake hold of radio's 
potentialities, and is pleased with the 
results. \ Northeast executive told 
sponsor that "broadcasting accounted 
for roughly one-half of our advertis- 
ing program in 1010." and both radio 
i Please turn to page 53 i 



Passengers in flight enjoy comfort, safety, and service in this TV still from a TWA commercial 
Plane sits for its portrait: movies went into TV spot commercial stressing airline's dependability 




and 

Make 
for 29.5 seconds — Dealers 

Happy 



It is actually possible, contrary to a lot of recent convention oratory, to make dealers 
happy these days. All you do is fill their stores with customers. 

Network radio, of course, is the most store-filling medium known. And there are several 
solid reasons why the radio network named Mutual can fill your dealers' stores with more 
customers (per dollar and per dealer) than any other network. 

High among these reasons is the fact that on Mutual alone— at no extra cost for facili- 
ties—you can stop your listeners and tell them where to go to buy your product... with 
29.5-second messages identifying local dealers by name and address. And Mutual can 
localize your message in almost twice as many markets as any other network. 

Yes, you can tell your sales story best in network radio— but many a sales story is 
incomplete without this Mutual-exclusive signpost right to the dealer's door. 

Obviously, this applies the power of point-of-sale merchandising to network broad- 
casting. Obviously, this extra, home-stretch effort makes dealers very happy indeed. 



The Difference is MUTUAL! 



+ 



REMEMBER THESE OTHER MUTUAL PLUS-DIFFERENCES: 

Lowest Costs, Hookup by Hookup, of All Networks 

largest Audiences Per Dollar in All Network Radio |(-, e Jff^f^ |f||Q brOddcCJSti ng 

500 Stations; 300 the Only Network Voice in Town 

Maximum Flexibility for Custom-Tailored Hookups 



mutual 



system 



How well does your 



TV commercial sell ? 



Two recent studies show qualitative 

research on commercials necessary 



Two New York area studies show similar results for TV commercials: 



71.1% 



88.0% 



■■■■■■:■ 






FoodS 
beveroges 



The Duane Jones results obtained during Nov. -Dec. 1949, are based 
on a return of about 1,300 questionnaires out of 5,000, the Look 
Hear results on ),144 returns from 2,000 questionnaires. Product 
categories in the two studies do not coincide exactly in every case, 
but are close enough to warrant comparison. 



Look Hear Survey 



Duone Jones Survey 



37.0% 






25.1% 



23.4% 



20.0% 



12.9% 

I 



6.8% 




Automobile 
accessories 



Toiletries 



II 7.0% 
" 14.7% 15.0% 
■ 



Home 
appliances 



(igarets & 
tobaccos 



Soaps and 
washing 
powders 



Percentage of respondents who bought products advertised. 



Most sponsors don't trv to 
analyze the efficiency of 
their sales messages in 
terms of results as ferventl) as they 
stud) the popularity of their programs, 
or the number of listeners to their an- 
nouncements. 

One of the reasons for this is laek 
of knowledge of the exact pulling pow- 
er of individual commercials. More 
important, even where some knowledge 
of individual commercial effectiveness 
is revealed, as in the stud) sponsored 
last October bv the commercial TV 
column Look Hear, the factors of fre- 
quencv of broadcast, facilities used, 
tvpe of commercial, etc., do not bv 
themselves explain the astonishing dif- 
ferences in the selling power of vari- 
ous commercials. 

Where external, quantitative re- 
search leaves olT. qualitative techniques 
must be assigned the job of telling the 
advertiser more about the element- in 
his selling message that make it pro- 
duce well, poorly, or not at all. This 
is perhaps even more important in TV 
than in \\1 broadcasting, because 
audio ami video, instead of supple- 
menting each other's sales punch, ma) 
actuall) tend to cancel each other out. 

\ chart accompan) ing ilii- stor) 
shows an interesting agreement be- 
tween a ~m ve) made last I )ecember bv 
the Duane Jones agenc) ol some 5,000 
viewers in the New >oik metropolitan 

area and 2.0(10 member-- of the Looh 

Hear TV Critics Club. Despite the evi- 
dence, however, of similar buying in 



similar categories of floods. that phase 
of the studies does not reveal the sig- 
nificant differences in the individual 
brands purchased hecause of televi- 
sion's influence. 

The Look Hear sample, -elected at 
random l>\ the American Management 
Council from among members of the 
column-sponsored club, is confined to 
the metropolitan circulation area of 
the \e\\ York Daily News and Herald- 
Tribune. The column appears weeklj 
in lioth papers. Characteristics of the 
sample are given in detail in parts one 
and two of this series. 

Slightly more than half of the re- 
spondents were women, of whom about 
three quarters were married. Sixty 
percent of the men were married. 

The outstanding characteristic of the 
breakdown In brands of each product 
category is the dominance by one or 
two brands by percentage of respond- 
ents who bought the products for the 
first time as a result of TV commer- 
cials. Electrical appliances, for exam- 
ple: 

General Electric . 24.2' < 

Wqstinghouse ... 12.1 

Philco 9.1 

RCA 6.1 

Admiral 6.1 

Not specified .... 33.3 

Miscellaneous .„ 9.1 

Three out of eight beers show some 
strength, although the leader is over 
four times as popular — sales-wise — as 
number three: 

Baflantine .. 43.5% 

Schaefer 30.0 

Rheingold 10.0 

R & H 3.3 

Piel's ... 3.3 

Blatz 3.3 

Kreuger 3.3 

Pabst 3.3 

Lipton and Kraft products easily 
dominate a list of 16: 

Upton's Products 31.9'; 

Kraft Products ..... 10.9 

Borden's Products .. 4.9 

Hi-V Orange Juice 5.2 

Betty Crocker Mixes 2.8 

Reddi-Whip 2.8 

Lihby Foods 2.5 

Messing Bakery Items 2.1 

Swifts Peanut Butter 2.1 

Peter Pan Peanut Butter 1.8 
Jane Parker Products 1.4 

Horn & Hardart 1.4 

Spry 1.4 

Crisco 1.4 

Miscellaneous Items 18.6 

Brands not specified 8.8 



Coffee purchasers gave Sanka a mar- 
gin of HIM)', to KM) , for Maxwell 

House, 5.0^5 loi Old Dutch, and :..u', 
for "coffee," no brand specified. Nes- 
tle's caml\ commercials were three 
times more productive with the LooA: 
II cm -ample than the next three 
brands. Mason. Musketeer, and Bo- 
nom's, each with Ll.1%. Whitman's 
followed with 5.5. Twenty -seven point 
nine percent mentioned "candy with- 
out naming a brand. 

These examples highlight the range 
in quantity of people who were in the 
Look Hear sample moved to buy a par- 
ticular brand on account of TV com- 
mercials. The various objective, exter- 
nal factors that affect a commercial - 
I lower to move people favorably, such 
as time, frequency, facilities, competi- 
tion, etc., are well known. 

Not so well known are the new tech- 
niques being developed for studying 
the more subjective, qualitative ele- 
ments that make a commercial sell. 



Newspapei - were the fa> <>< it'- soun e 
of program information of Critics 
Clubbers, as shown l>\ the following: 

First Second 
Choic< Choice 

TV columns ;;:.:.', 32.6^3 

Program schedules 38.7 30.8 

Friend's 

recommendation 8.4 9.7 

Newspaper 

advertising 4.9 13.3 

Magazines .. 7.1 4.8 

TV station 

announcements 2.5 8.8 

Harrv E. Garret. Professor of Psy- 
chology of Columbia University, says 
in his recently published book, Psy- 
chology- that an advertising reader for- 
gets what he sees or hears 46' < within 
two days. He goes on to say. however. 
that by repeating an ad or the copy ap- 
peal of a campaign at five-day inter- 
vals the average reader may recall as 
much as 73' < after 35 days. * * * 



First-time purchases via TV 



Dominance by one or two brands in first-time purchases via TV is a 
significant characteristic of each category below. 



Hair Preparations 



Wildroot 
Vaseline 

lustre (reme 
Drene 
Vitalis 

Trot 




48.1% 



3.7% 
3.7% 

3.7% 



Not specified 1 1 3.7% 



Washing Products 




Dial 1 1.4% 
Vel 1 1.4% 



Dentifrices 



Dr. Lyon's 

Kolynos 

No brand specified 

Miscellaneous brands 




37.4% 



25.5% 



5.1% 




1 76.2% 



WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. iAPPLIANCE DIVISION) 
246 E. Fourth Street, Mansfield, Ohio 



am/fm 



Products Covered: Refrigerators, ranges. Laundromats, dryers, water heaters, 

Waste-Aways, water coolers, fans, vacuum cleaners, roasters, 
bed coverings, irons, toasters, mixers, warming pads, waffle 
bakers, sandwich grills, coffee makers, hot plates 

Type Radio Approved: All types. (Station reports to BAB indicate, among programs 
used, a preference on the advertiser's part for news and 
sports shows. Both live and transcribed announcements are 
being used, but stations reporting use of transcriptions were 
less numerous. ) 

Split of Costs: :.icturcr, 50J - Dealer, 50% 

Other Media Approved: Newspapers, outdoor and identification 



Please do not write the manufacturer. 


Contact vour local dealer or di 


itributor. 




Issued by BAB: July 1949 


£• T-T* ' ! 


ffl 


Bureau 




THE CIRCULAR CHART ON THE RIGHT IS BASED ON DATA CONTAINED ON BAB CO-OP INDEX CARDS LIKE THE ONE ABOVE 



Critique on co-op 



lois of advertisers are doing it. 
but most of them the hard way 




What's wrong with dealer co- 
operate e radio advertising? 
Win is it so often a head- 
ache? The answer to lioth question-.: 
most co-op plans are much too un- 
wieldy, are being handled the hard 
way. 

In reach the dealer who is his di- 
rect link with the buying public, the 
co-op advertiser mu-l fir>| clear an ol>- 
stacle course of middlemen — regional 
distributors, stale distributors, and 
area distributors. Each has his own 



slant on merchandising and advertis- 
ing problems within his own bailiwick. 
While they bicker, the hottest cam- 
paign grows stone-cold, customers go 
elsewhere. 

Many a dealer co-op plan that was 
a joy on paper collapsed at the cru- 
cial moment because of a single snag 
in the long line of intermediate par- 
ties linking manufacturer and dealer. 
On the other hand, the plan may work 
like a charm. The operation is a 
model ot merchandising logistics — but 



ffoii* <fo<*.v i/oitr <*o-o|» /H-of/i-Miu iiicdvinc up? 


f. 


Simplicity — too many co-op plans are cluttered with non-essential 




elements slowing the machinery, adding to the costs. 


2, 


Flexibility — each plan should be tailored to tit the individual, or 




local situation. 


:i. 


Follow-through — close supervision at every level is essential. 


4. 


Information — everyone concerned must know the whole story. 



the customer gets aw a\ . Who threw 
the monkey wrench? Nobody. But a 
plan worked out at a factors in Terre 
Haute, Ind., let us say. will not often 
work with equal success for a dealer 
in Scranton. Pa., and another dealer 
in Orlando. Fla. 

How can such situations be im- 
proved? The manufacturer can save 
himself a lot of grief at the outset 1>\ 
the simple strategem of conducting his 
co-op campaign with the dealer direct- 
Iv. thus In passing the regional, state. 
and area distributors in the middle, 
and saving much valuable time. Mean- 
while, the manufacturer is in position 
for a frontal attack on one of the more 
valid criticisms of co-op advertising: 
the contention that the sales message 
often loses impact because it isn't lo- 
calized enough. 

Its common enough for dealers who 
participate in co-op campaigns to 
charge thai the) aren t getting a fair 
-hake because their local identification 
with the nationally-advertised product 
amount- to a mere mention or two. 
Perhaps it was a line like this at the 
end of a one-minute announcement: 
i Please turn to page 55 1 



34 



SPONSOR 



Categorical breakdown of 94 radio co-op advertisers 



CATEGORY 



WATCHES 



CLOTHING- 
HOSIERY, UNIFORMS, 
SPORTSWEAR, SHOES 



DRUGS, 

COSMETICS, 

TOILETRIES 



TIRES, 

TUBES, 

ACCESSORIES 



PAINTS, 

VARNISHES, ETC. 
WALLPAPER 



GASOLINE AND OIL 



BOTTLED GAS 



PENS, PENCILS 

DEHUMIDIFIER, 

SOOT DESTROYER 

PHARMACEUTICALS 

CLEANER, SOAP POWDER 

INSURANCE 

SOFT DRINKS 

AUTOMOBILES 



ADVERTISER 



Elgin Natl. Watch. Co. 
Harvel Watch Co. 
Gruen Watch Co. 



A. Sagner's Sons, Inc. 

(Northcool suits) 
NoMcnd Hosiery, Inc. 
White Swan Uniforms 
Goodall Co. 
F. Jacobson & Sons, Inc. 

(Jayson shirts, sportswear) 
Acrobat Shoe Co. 



Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co. 

Colonial Dames, Inc. 
Dorothy Gray, Ltd. 
Milkmaid, Inc. 



B. F. Goodrich Co. 

Gates Rubber Co., Sales Div. 

Armstrong Rubber Co. 

Seiberling Rubber Co. 



Valentine & Co. (Valspar) 
Foy Paint Co. 
Devoe & Raynolds, Inc. 
Marietta Paint & Color Co. 
Schorn Paint Mfg. Co. 
Janney-Semple-Hill & Co. 

National Lead Co. (Dutch Boy) 
American Marietta Co. 

(Valdura Paints, etc.) 
Sewall Paint & Varnish Co. 
DuPont de Nemours 
W. P. Fuller & Co. 

(paints & wallpaper) 
Lowe Brothers Co. 
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 
Baltimore Paint & Color Works 

(Gleem paints) 
John Lucas & Co. 



Sinclair Refining Co. 
Standard Oil of Cal. 



Pyrofax Gas Div., Carbine & Carbon 
Chem. Corp. 



Parker Pen Co. 
G. N. Couglan Co. 

Rhodes Pharmacol Co. (Imdrim) 
Lan-O-Sheen, Inc. 
Jefferson Standard Life 
Mission Dry Corp. 
Nash Motors 



RADIO TYPE APPRVD. 



Announcements 
Live Announcements 
Announcements 



Announcements 

Announcements 
Uspecificd 
Announcements 
Announcements 

Pgms., Announcements 



Announcements 



Live Announcements 



COST SPLIT 



'i of purchases 
Fact. SO, Dealer 50 
', of dealer purchases 



Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 

Factory 50, Dealer 50 
Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 
Generally 50-50 
r 'r of purchases 

Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 



'( of gross sales volume, 

all products 
Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 



(arranged individually) 
Women's pgm. participa- 


Mfr. 
Mfr. 


50, 
50, 


Dealer 
Dealer 


50 
50 


tions 










Pgms., Announcements 


Various 






Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Various, including sports 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


pgms. 
ETs, Announcements, 
Pgms. 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Pgms., Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Pgms., Announcements 


Fact 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Unspecified 


Fact 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Unspecified 


Fact 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


ET Announcements, also 


Fact 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


live if preferred 










Pgms., Announcements 


Fact 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Unspecified 


Fact 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Unspecified 


Fact 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


1-min. Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


Announcements, music. 


Mfr. 


50, 


Dealer 


50 


sports, news pgms. 
Unspecified 


', 


f dealer purchases 


Pgms., Announcements 


Mfr. 


50, 


Deal. . 


50 


Pgms., Announcements 
ET Announcements 


Deal 
Mfr. 

Mfr. 


. 50 
50, 

">0 


, Mfr. 
Dealer 

Dealer 


SO 
50 

50 



Announcements 

1-min. Announcements 

Announcements 

All types 



Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 
Company 50, Agent 50 
Mfr. 50, Deal. 50 
Fact. 50, Deal. 50 



'Source: Broadcast Advertising Bureau. 



16 JANUARY 1950 



Continued on next page 

35 



Categorical breakdown of 94 radio eo-op advertisers (cont'd) 



CATEGORY 


ADVERTISER 


RADIO TYPE APPRVD. 


COST SPLIT % 


RADIOS, TV SETS, 


Stromberg-Carlson Co. 


Live Announcements 


Mfr. 30, Dist. 20, Deal. 50 


RECORDS, PHONOGRAPHS 


Columbia Records 
RCA 


Announcements, Pgms. 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




Announcements, Pgms. 


Mfr. 25, Dist. 25, Deal. 50 




Motorola, Inc. 


Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




Zenith Radio Corp. 


Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 






HOME APPLIANCES, 


York Corp. 


Announcements, Pgmv 


Mfr. 25, Dist. 25, Deal. 50 


EQUIPMENT, 


Westinghouse (Appliance Div.) 


All Types 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 


REFRIGERATION, 


Gen. Refrig. Div., Yates-American 


Announcements, mainly 


Fact. 75, Dealer 25 


HEATING SYSTEMS, 


Machine Co. 


during sports pgrm. 




ETC. 


Leeson Steel Products, Inc. 


Announcements 


Fact. 50, Deal. 50 


Eo y Washing Machine Corp. 


Pgms, Announcements 


Fact. 50, Deal. 50 




York-Shipley, Inc. 


Announcements 


Fact. 25, Dist. 25, Deal. 50 




Gibson Refrigerator Co. 


Announcements, Pgm-i. 


Mfr. 50, Deal. 50 




Lewyt Corp., Vacuum Cleaner Div. 


Live Announcement" 


Mfr. 25, Dist. 25, Deal. 50 




Arvln Div., Noblitt-Sparks, Inc. 


Live Announcements 


Deal. 50, Dist. 10, Arvin 
Factory Fund, 40 




Iron Fireman Mfg. Co. 


Announcements 


Fact. 50, Dealer 50 




Ironrite Ironer Co. 


Announcements 


Fact. 50, Dealer 50 




Williams Oil-0-Matic Div., Eureka 


Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




Williams Corp. 








Landers, Frary & Clark 


D ams., Announcement- 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




Deepfreeze Div., Motor Prod. Corp. 


Pgms., Announcement'. 


Mfr. 33 1/, Dist. 16 2 3, 
Dealer 50 




Crane Co. 


Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




Stewart-Warner Electric 


Pgms., Announcements 


Mfr. 25, Dist. 25, Deal. 50 




Servel, Inc. 


Announcements 


Mfr. 33 1 3, Deal. & Dist., 

66 2/3 




U. S. Machine Corp. 


Pgms., Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Deal. 50 




Carrier Corp. 


Pgms., Announcements 


Mfr. 25, Deal. 50, Dist. 25 




Barlow & Seelig Mfg. Co. 


Not Specified 


Believed to be 50-50 




Frigidaire Div., GMC 


Pgms., Announcements 


Fact. 50, Deal. 50 




Dexter Washing Machines 


Pgms., Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




American Stove Co. 


Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




American Central Div., AVCO 


Announcements, break- 
fast club pgms. 


Mfr. 25, Dist. 25, Deal. 50 




Dearborn Stove Co. 


Announcements 


Fact. 50, Dealer 50 




1900 Corp. (Whirlpool Home Laun- 


Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer and or 




dry equipment) 




Dist. 50 




Hotpoint, Inc. 


Pgms., Announcements 


Mfr. 40, Dist. 10, Deal. 50 




Belmont Papers, Inc. 


Pgms or Announcements 


Up to 2', of dealer's net 
purchases 




Blackstone Corp. (washing ma- 


Package ETs 


Fact. -Deal. -Dist., 33 1/3 




chines) 








American Coolair Corp. 


Live Announcements 


Factory 50, Dealer 50 




Rheem Mfg. Co. 


Announcements, Pgms. 


Fact. 25, Wholesaler 25, 
Dealer 50 




Fowler Mfg. Co. (water heaters) 


Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




Horton Mfg. Co. 


Pgms., Announcements 


Fact. 25, Dist. 25, Deal. 50 




Sealy, Inc. (furniture) 


Pgms., Announcements 


Fact. 50, Dealer 50 




Tappan Stove Co. 


Announcements 


Not Specified 




Coolerator Co. 


Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dist. 50 




Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp. 


Unspecified 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




Nash-Kelvinator Corp. 


Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




International Harvester Co. 


Announcements 


Wholesaler 50, Dealer 50 




General Electric Co., Appliance and 


Announcements 


Various 




Merchandise Dcpt. 








Day & Night Div., Affiliated Gas 


ET Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




Equipment Co., Inc. 








Amana Society, Refrigeration Div. 


Announcements, News 


Factory 50, Dealer 50 




Croslcy Div., AVCO Mfg. Corp. 


Announcements 


Various 




Nestle LcMur Co. (permanent wave 


Live Announcements 


Mfr. 50, Dealer 50 




machines, accessories) 








A. 0. Smith Corp., Water Heater 


Announcements 


Mfr. 67, Dealer 33 



36 



SPONSOR 




NO, 510 /SN'T 
OUR f REQUEK CY 

ITS OUR NEW ADDRESS 

IN NEW YORK 



16 JANUARY 1950 



37 



And now the HPL is in 



January 16: Columbia's great 50,000-watt affiliate in 

Richmond, WRVA, became the tenth station to broadcast. . . 
locally. . . radio's most sales-effective participating 

program— "The Housewives' Protective League." 



You can get rich in Richmond. And in 77 
oilier counties of 3 big-buying states. For 
WRVA — the only 50,000-watt station in 
\ irginia— carries "The Housewives' Protective 
League" programs throughout a market with 
PJ0.000 radio families whose retail spending 
adds up to ;. neat $1,412,700,000 a year! 
Or take oil 10 of the great 111*1, markets. 
Now. with the addition of WRVA to the nine 
other big stations already broadcasting local l\ 
"The Housewives' Protective League," your 
product-moving HPL commercials can be 
carried throughout 10 of the country's most 
important markets— covering 14,657,040 radio 
homes ... 37.3 % of the national total! \nd 
these product-consuming families buy ever) 



kind of product to the time of $51,612,021,000 
;i \car in retail sales. That's '.V).6' , of the 
national total ! 

// will nay you to take a tip from the more 
than 200 sales-minded national spot and 
regional advertisers who have bad their prod- 
ucts sponsored bv the HPL during the past 
twelve months. Their dollar- and sense 
testimony is proof thai "The Housewives' Pro- 
tective League" is the most sales-effective 
participating program in all radio. 
For more information about the HPL on 
\VI\\ \ or any of the nine other gre;it CBS 
stations carrying the program, get directly in 
touch with any of the stations, their national 
spot representatives, or. . . 



THE HOUSEWIVES' PROTECTIVE LEAGUE 

"Tin- program that sponsors the product 

A DIVISION OF CBS: 485 MADISON AVE, NY— COLUMBIA SQUARE. HOLLYWOOD 



AMONG THOSE USING THE HPl DURING 1949: 



Richmond... 

on WRVA ! 



HPL Eastern Markets 



NEW YORK 

(50,000-watt WCBS) 


PHILADELPHIA 

(50,000-watt WCAU) 


WASHINGTON 

(50,000-ivatt WTOP) 


RICHMOND 

(50,000-watt WRVA) 



MINNEAPOLIS 

(50,000-watt WCCO) 



CHICAGO 

(50,000-watt WBBM*) 



ST. LOUIS 

(50,000-watt KMOX) 



SEATTLE 

(50.000-natt KIRO) 



SAN FRANCISCO 

(5,000-watt KCBS) 



LOS ANGELES 

(50,000-watt KNXi 



HPL Midwest Markets HPL Western Markets 



''The Paul Gibson Show 



Absorene 

Accent 

Aljohn Co. 

Amazo 

American Cranberry 

Austin Paint 

Awlul Fresh MacForlane 

Bakers Cocoa 

Beatrice Foods 

Bell Brook Dairies 

Bellone Hearing Aid 

Bertrand's Printing Co. 

Black Poultry Co. 

Bliss Coffee 

Borden's 

Brentwood Mart 

Briggs & Co. 

Butler Mfg. Co. 

Cobanay Products 

Calif. Lima Beans 

Campbell Soups 

Canada Dry 

Candeliqht House 

Capper Publications 

Carbonoid 

Cargill Inc. 

Childs Restaurants 

Cinch Cake Mix 

Citizens' Federal Savings 

Cleor Tone Hearing Aid 

Coca Cola 

Colonlol Airlines 

Columbia Fed. Savings 

Congress Oil 

Constitutional Life Ins. 

Continental Baking 

Corn Products 

Cowles Publications 

Crock Lets 

Craig Oil 

CrowellCollier 

Crunchy Cookies 

Dairy-Aide 

Dixie Preserves 

Doeskin Products 

Donald Duck Orange Juice 

Doubleday Co. 

The Drackett Co. 

Drano 

Dugan Brothers 

Durlacque Mfg. Co. 

E i S Frozen Foods 

Eggo Waffle Mix 

Family Laundry Assn. 

Family Reading Club 

Federal Life & Casualty 

First Federal Savings 

Flex OLace 

Florsheim Shoes 

Fred Astaire 

French's Instant Potato 

Freshrap 

Fritos 

Fuller Brushes 

M. A. Gedney Co. 

General Electric 

General Foods 

General Motors 

Gordon Baking Co. 

Glim 

Green Spot Orangeade 

Greyslone Press 

Griffin Shoe Polish 

Gwaltney Meals 

H 4 P Coffee Co. 

Halliburton Erie Co. 

Harry & David 

H. J. Heinz Co. 

Hi Lite Dog Food 

Hills Brothers Co. 

Holiday Magazine 

Holm Tomatoes 

Holsum Bread 

Home Bldg. S Loon Assn 

Hotpoint 

Hot Shoppes 

Hunt Foods Inc. 

Illinois Electric Co. 

International Harvester 

Irving s Dairy 

Isolex 

Jay's Potato Chips 

Jekyll Island Shrimp 

Jelke Margarine 



Herb Jones Co. 

Juice Industries 

Ken Glass 

Kirby Vacuums 

Klever Kook Food Co. 

Kroft Products Co. 

Krisloferson Dairy 

La Choy Chinese Dinner 

ladies Home Journal 

L I M Plastic Aprons 

langendorf Bakeries 

Leoch Co. 

lettuce Leaf Oil 

Lever Brothers Co. 

linens of the Week 

lite Soop Co. 

London Specialties Co. 

Lubertone 

Lyon Van S Storage 

Majestic Mayonnaise 

Meadow Gold Ice Creom 

Megowen Educator Foods 

Menner's Rice 

Metropolitan Fed. Savings 

Miami Margarine 

Michigan Bulbs 

Michigan Mushrooms 

Microtone Hearing Aid 

Hilnol 

Mit7a Rug Cleaners 

Modglin Co. 

Mors Cheese Co. 

My-T-Fine 

The Nestle Co. 

New England Confectionery 

Nu Tone Chimes 

Nu-Trishus Corp. 

Ookite 

Occident Flour 

Ocean Sproy Cranberries 

Connell Packing Co. 

Ohrbach's 

Oil Heat Institute 

Old Manse Syrup 

Olympic Gardens Bulbs 

Omnibook 

Pan American Coffee 

Paradise Garden Bulbs 

Perfex 

Perk Dog Food 

Pictsweet Frozen Foods 

Plllsbury Mills 

Pioneer Savings i Loon 

Plastic Food Bags 

Plymouth Motor Corp. 

Premier Foods 

Pritz Cleaner 

Prodentiol Bldg. Assn. 

Puritan MarsfHnollows 

Puget Sound P & L Co. 

Reolemon 

Rislone 

Roman Meal Co. 

Rusco Windows 

Schick Shavers 

Schneider Baking Co. 

Geo. E. Shompson Co. 

Sherwood Gardens Bulbs 

Simoniz 

Snow Crop 

SOS 

Spark Stove Co. 

Sterling Salt 

St. Louis Fed. Savings 

Slokely Foods 

Ten-8-low 

Tony Salad Dressing 

TWA 

Twin City Fed. Sovings 

Twinlock Hangers 

Van Houten s Cocoo 

Virginia Maryland Milk 

Ward Baking Co. 

Washington Post 

Wash. State Fruit Comm. 

Webb s Coffee 

Western Reddi Wip 

Wilkins Coffee 

Willys Jeeps 

Windex 

Wipe On 

Wise Potato Chips 

Wm H. Wise Books 

Yes Tissues 



To Sell 

the 

Southeast 

Be Sure to Include 
The Station That— 



i. 



? 



3 



Not only covers its 
home market com- 
pletely but reaches 
a vast rural audi- 
ence as well in its 
total Georgia- 
South Carolina 
area. 



Has more daytime 
coverage area than 
any other 5,000 
watt station in the 
entire Southeast. 



Offers as its best 
recommendation a 
large list of spot 
clients, including 
many of the na- 
tion's leading ad- 
vertisers. 



ADVERTISERS 

Are making new sales 
records on 



WGAC 



580 Kc- ABC -5,000 Watts 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

Avcry-Knodel 



RTS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS... 



-continued from page 2— 

NBC operates experimental 
UHF TV transmitter 

After NBC completes its experimental operations 
with its satellite ultra-high-frequency television 
station in Bridgeport, Conn., looking toward re- 
assignment of TV channels, it will submit the re- 
sults of the experiments to the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission. NBC expects to be more successful 
convincing the FCC to reassign TV channel frequen- 
cies than it was in its battle for color television. 

Network package show 
boom continues 

Networks continue to promote their package shows 
successfully. Currently, about one-third of all the 
Columbia Broadcasting System's commercial radio net- 
work time consists of sponsored CBS package shows. 
By the end of 1949, CBS television programing in- 
increased from 28% hours a week to 45% hours, of 
which 30% hours are CBS package shows. (See p. 21) 

Liberty Broadcasting System will operate 
coast to coast during baseball season 

More than a hundred stations in 28 states have 
signed option agreements for the Liberty Broadcast- 
ing System's baseball broadcasts. This expanded net- 
work operation will give LBS a coast-to-coast hook- 
up during the diamond season. 

Radio's income increased 
in 1949 

Gross income for the radio broadcasting industry in 
1949 increased 4.5% as compared to 1948. However, 
operating costs for the year rose 4%. Federal taxes 
amounted to 16% against 17.1% for the preceding 
year. Total gross 1949 income for the industry was 
approximately $435,279,000, as compared with $416,- 
720,279 in 1948. 

Ropei reports 
on televiewing 

Average TV set owner watches television two hours 
per day, according to Elmo Roper's latest national 
survey. Two-thirds see a program every day. Women 
spend more time televiewing than men; lower income 
people more than those in higher brackets. 

$400,000,000 auto industry 
rd program 

The $400,000,000 to be spent by the automotive 
industry in 1950 for advertising is a record break- 
ing amount. Expenditures by General Motor's 
Chevrolet division tops the list with $27,000,000. 
Ford follows with an outlay of $22,000,000. 



40 



SPONSOR 



FEATURES 



OF THE 

MAURER 
16 MM. CAMERA 




The Maurer 16 mm. camera is the answer to your 
exacting TV production requirements. Designed 
specifically for professional use, it produces 
steadier, sharper and more accurately composed 
pictures under all conditions. Ease of operation, 
combined with many other unique features make 
the Maurer Professional tops in performance 
and dependability. 

The 16 mm. Camera Designed 

Specifically for Professional Use! 

For details on these and other exclusive 
Maurer features, Write: 



•I. A. Maurer. i\< 

37-01 31st Street, Long Island Citv L, N.Y. 



maurer 

■ •'uuuuuu 



v « / /y 



16 JANUARY 1950 



41 




Mr. Sponsor asks. 




Mr. Ross 



The 

Piekecl Panel 
answers 
Mr. I u «'ii 

^ es . . . and No. 
\\ hen \ on add 
the words "to the 
besl possible pro- 
gramming" at the 
< - 1 1 « I of that ques- 
tion. I begin to 
qualify. As an 
analyst of pro- 
gramming its 
techniques, talent 
and costs I have watched and waited 
in vain for television to emerge from 
the restrictive patterns of radio broad- 
casting. To a great degree, AM radio's 
label of mediocritv lias been imposed 
by advertisers compromising with 
• OStS. How much more then is the 
qualit) of visual programming likel) 
to suffei if advertisers continue to ad- 
here to radio formulas is coping with 
the aknowledged many-times-higher 
costs ol television broadcasting? 

^ es, advertisers \\ ill continue to 
finance television because it is the besl 
salesman the) have evei bad. \ case- 
book can be built up to support this 
thesis. television idverlising lias 
proved to be Selling idvertising. It 
will justif) increased budget appro- 
priations b) dint of the increased vol- 
ume of business thai it generates. Vnd 
there are several possible routes open 
to the advertising industry in meeting 
the overall costs "I the likeliest busi- 
m - giant of the new half centur) . 

Assuming thai this is the time to 
act, an) one of the following path- . in- 
worth tackling to divorce the adver- 



"C an advertising be expeetecl to supply suffi- 

eient revenue to finanee a television system 

giving complete national coverage?" 



William H. Ewen 



Assistant Advertising Manager 
Borden Company, New York, N. Y. 



tising imiusti v from this compromising 
with costs: 

1. Networks can follow up the ex- 
plorations of DuMont and NBC in 
block programming . . . that is. the 
building and telecasting ol programs 
to affiliates, who can sell time in and 
around these programs locally. Du- 
Mont's daytime operation is directly 
.limed at the local merchant for whom 
television can be bis salesman in the 
home. Television has already been 
proved to pay off in direct sales. 

2. Spot Advertising — both regional 
and local — can assume an even more 
prominent role than in AM broadcast- 
ing. The use of film promises to out- 
strip the achievements of recorded 
transcriptions, and it can bring more 
and direct profits to both advertisers 
and local stations. 

3. Divided sponsorship — the trend 
toward alternate weekl) broadcasts, 
both as a cost saver and talent saver 
i Inside I S \. ford Theater, Big Story, 
Ken \lurrav. IVrle'.' i as well as a pos- 
sible alternate sponsorship of a weekl) 
show mav enable more sponsors to 
"get into the medium." 

But television as a sale-man war- 
rants great improvement in television 
as an entertainer. If financial main- 
tenance bv advertising continues to 
piove a limitation on creative accom- 
plishments through compromising with 
• osts. then I. for one. would welcome 
"boxoffice television" ol wlial have von 
as an adjunct. Both advertising and 
the motion picture industr) have 
proved two ,.| the d) namic influences 
on this country's recenl economic 
growth. Wedding the two offers a po- 
tential prodig) that can attain new 
heights economically and aslheticallv 

while alleviating financial worries of 
both parent-. 

If. as at bast one recenl stud) has 
advised, "pa) as you see" television 



can be profitable to the motion picture 
industry, profitable to the broadcaster, 
aid the advertiser bv assuming a greai 
part of televisions fixed costs, and 
cater to the viewer bv giving him in- 
creased qualit) programming, I'm for 
making the experiment. 

Mr. Sponsor would be missing the 
boat if he didn't hire television as a 
salesman. Mr. Movieman must get into 
television somehow. Mr. Broadcaster 
is obligated to pay bis bills. \nd Mr. 
\ iewer is owed a debt of good pro- 
gramming. If advertising cannol sup- 
pi) welcome programming while meet- 
ing television's growing costs. I'm for 
giving advertising some help. 

Wallack A. Ross 
Publisher 

Ross Reports on Television 
Programming, V. ). 

I don't know the 
answer to it. I 
do know thai the 
broadcasting in- 

dii-li \ bad better 

Lici sei iouslv con- 
cerned with the 
full implications 
of the question. 
I' aught s book 
Wayne Coy makes you think 

about this problem. II broadcasting, as 
we know it. canhol provide the pro- 
grams the American public wants to 
see, some form of boxoffice television 

must be found to supplement the pres- 
ent commercial sponsorship of com- 
mercial show-. 

\\ vi m Cm 

Chairman 

I ederal Communications 

Commission 

U (ishiniilon. I). (.'. 




42 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Hettinger 



Boiled down to 
its essentials, the 
thesis of Dr. 
Faught's socio- 
economic analy- 
sis of "Some Bil- 
lion Dollar Ques- 
tions About Tele- 
vision" revolves 
around the fol- 
lowing hypothe- 



sis: 111 assuming a theoretical nation 
wide network of 1.000 TV stations plus 
200 satellite transmitters, the estimated 
annual operating cost would be over 
$1.7 billion; (2) this is a lot of money 
and, again theoretically, would require 
the production of an added $80 billion 
new business in the economy if televi- 
sion were to grow without doing so at 
the expense of other media; and (3) 
television has an opportunity to secure 
additional economic support by put- 
ting a "box office" on television receiv- 
ers so that TV "could also be used to 
distribute and sell entertainment, edu- 
cation and other cultural matter." 

Estimates made now as to televi- 
sion's long-range dollar volume, and 
of its net addition to total advertising 
expenditures, are more likely to be con- 
servative than extreme. Viewed over a 
comparatively long-range period, tele- 
\ ision revenues are more likely to be 
larger, instead of smaller than expect- 
ed; always assuming, of course, a con- 
tinued high level for the American 
economy. 

If there is likelihood of revenues ex- 
ceeding expectations over any reason- 
ably long-range period, there is also 
the certainty that Dr. Faught's 1,000- 
station hypothesis, with its estimated 
$1.1 billion annual operating charges, 
will remain theoretical at least for some 
time to come — and this without im- 
pairing the public or advertising value 
of this new medium one iota. 

Important has been the manner in 
which the nation's radio station struc- 
ture evolved during the early years. 
The core of this structure has always 
been the unlimited time, clear channel 
and regional stations. The clear chan- 
nel stations have served both major 
markets and wide areas surrounding 
them. The regional, unlimited time 
stations have been the radio counter- 
part of the average city daily, and 
serve all of our major markets and 
their surrounding trade areas. Their 
importance today can be seen from 
the fact that although in 1947 these 
(Please turn to page 61 I 




Pl£NTy WHEN YOU'RE SELLING CHICAGO 
AND 257 KEY MID-WESTERN COUNTIES ON VICT LI 

Your sales story on WCFL goes out to Chicago and 251 Key-Counties 
in 5 rich, middle-western states. This actual audience coverage is based 
on a 30,000 letter-pattern. 

8,289,763 consumers in the primary.' 5,421,020 in the secondary/ 

A POTENTIAL $15,000,000,000 ANNUAL MARKET 

As the Voice of Labor. WCFL has a special tie with the well-paid craftsman 
and wage-earners in this prosperous, industrial area. 

For full information, contact WCFL or The Boiling Company. 



WCFL 

50,000 watts • 1 000 on the dial 

The Voice of Labor 

666 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, III. 

Represented by the Boiling Company, Inc. 

An ABC Affiliate 



16 JANUARY 1950 



43 



AIM HOOK 



< OM I A I lOMItV 



SPONSOR: Doubledaj & Co. VGENCY: Huber Hoge 

CAPS! LE < VSE HISTORY: A $1.00 art ins/ruction 

book was the offer on tin',- 10 p.m. Saturday night quar- 
ter-hour "art lesson." At the end of this three-program 
-.cries featuring artist Jon Gnagy, 3,066 people had sent 
a dollar for the hook. The client was surprised at the 
staying power <>i the Tl audience since the program fol- 
lowed lico hours of continuous variety entertainment. 
II ould-be artists are still sending in their dollars and 
Doubleday is well pleased with its artistic success. 

WFIL-TV, Philadelphia PROGR Wl : Jon Gnagj 



f 



TV 

results 



SPONSOR < ,,. .,- I', .in, i- AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE ( W. HISTORY: The program is a half- 

hour shoie built around the circus motif. A free Bozo 
mask was offered at first for every vote sent in for Bozo 
For Mayor — 886 votes were received. The following spot 
announcement was a special test. Audience was offered 
a small viewer with Bozo's picture on it for two empty 
peanut bags plus It) cents. In two weeks there were 540 
requests and the final count reached over 1,000 — all on 
two announcements. 



KTTV, Los Angeles 



PROGR Wl: "B ./.,'- ( ircus" 



HA K I ICY <.OOOS 



SPONSOR: Dutches |'i,. ( o. \(.l N( \ : Waller Klein 

CAPSULE CASK HISTORY: A one-minute slide an- 

nouncement once weekly is worth this baker's dough. 
Each week the portrait of a famous man in history is 
/lashed for five seconds. People correcth identifying the 
"History Mystery Man" receive a coupon good for one 
~>l)c pie. This bO-second spot had a total of 651 returns 
in three viewings — an excellent response considering there 
are but 10JHH) Tl owners in the station's area. The cost 
was slightly more than 10c per response. 



WBTV, Charlotte 



PROORAM: Spots 



Al TO IM Al I It 



MUSIC (OMPWV 



spoNsOR: Gilmore Chevrolel AGENCY: Direct 

CAPS! LE < VSI HISTORY: The program is a one- 

half hour live telecast on Sundays in which eight guests 
from the studio audience play charades. On one telecast. 
the sponsor wanted to see how many calls or customers he 
would receive if he made a special "service" offer to all 
< hevrolet car owners in the area. The response was well 
in ci 2,000 calls from this one video show a bigger re- 
sponse than he had evei had from any other medium of 
advertising. Tl advertising had passed Mi. Gilmore's 
test! 



kl'IV San Francisco 



PROGR Wl: "Share a Charade' 



I.I IT SHOP 



sponsor: cu u -k Music Co. VGENl \ : Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This sponsor normally 

goes in for institutional advertising on large items such 
as pianos and organs. On a weekly talent show, however. 
$15 music boxes were plugged and the cash registers 
were playing a merry jingle. Before the program went 
off the air, there were three telephone calls for positive 
orders. The next day shotted a complete sell-ou' on the 
item with a brisk floor trade asking for the music boxes. 



\\ III N. Syracuse 



PROGR Wl: " mand Performance" 



i i KM I I IC1 



spONsOR: Silard's Shop 

CAPSI I I i VSI HISTORY : Sponsoi carries an ex- 

clusive line o) China, porcelain and Irish belique. II was 
selected because it reached the type <>l audience sponsor 
wanted. Previously, onl\ direct mail was used. I pai 
ticipation /*</s used on a late-evening live musical slum 
and items tanging from $2.50 to $65 were useil on the 
tele, usis. Response was excellent and customers coming 

in to the gift shop to Inn the $2.50 item spent many times 

that total before they left. 



Kin I TV, Sail Lake City 



PROOR Wl: Participation 



SPONSOR: Harbour Longmire VGI Ni \ Direcl 

l M'sl II CAS1 ills loin : This firm tool a >■ 

minute spot following "The Square Dance shou to help 
mote a supply oj licit -l\pe posture chairs and mote 
them they did! Itlt untaxes of the cltaii ite/e demon- 
strated and the retail pmc oj $207 was announced. The 
In m latci reported that 53 chairs had been sold with at 
least It) of the sales definitely tuned to the II one-time 
shot. That's $2,070 not tit oi results pit a satisfied Tl 
advertiser. 



\\k> T\. okl,l,..,.K, < im 



PROGROM Spots 



LANCASTER, PEN NA. 






~ 



delivers a buying audience 

WGAL-TV is the consistent choice of all viewers 

in prosperous Lancaster and its adjoining area. It is the onlv 

television station located in this large and thriving 

market. WGAL-TV presents your sales message with eye and 

ear appeal to an audience that's growing hv leaps and 

hounds because of interesting, skillful local programming. 

and the top shows of all four television networks — 

NBC, CBS, ABC and DuMont. WGAL-TV is doing a good 

job for many advertisers. Remember, too, it is the only 

station that delivers von this consistent, buying audience. 

Cost? — surprisinglv low ! W rite for information. 

Represented by Robert Meeker Associates 

CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK LOS ANGELES 




TV-AFFILIATE 



STEINMAN 
STATIONS 

Clair R. McCollough 
General Manager 

WGAL 

WGAL-TV 

Lancaster, Pa. 

WKBO 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

WORK 

York, Pa. 

WRAW 

Reading, Pa. 

WEST 

Eastern, Pa. 

WDE L 

WDEL-TV 

Wilmington, Del. 



16 JANUARY 1950 



45 



"Imitation is the 
sincerest form of flattery " 



SPONSOR is the most 



imitated advertising 



trade publication 



today. 




510 MADISON AVENUE 

NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK 



46 



SPONSOR 



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BBM IN CANADA 

[Continued from page 2i i 

and Canada's broadcasting industry. 

When, a year later, organization 
work for Broadcast Measurement Bu- 
reau got under way, BBM says, the 
American group was "able t<> stud) 
Bl \1 organization and profit from 
BBM experience. I" return BMB de- 
veloped man) refinements in method 
ami practice" which have I een made 
availal le to BBM. Since BMB's Studs 
Nil 1 in BJ46, and before, the two 
organizations have used the same sys- 
tem, have worked in close cooperation, 
and have used one another's data and 
technical consultants. 

Advertisers and agencies in both 
countries have cooperated with these 
organiza ions, and have been vir uall\ 
unanimous in calling both BBM and 
BMB needed tools for the effective bu) - 
ing of broadcast time. 

Why, lli n. is BBM succeeding, while 
BMB has failed? 

The answers will \ar\ according to 
whether a Canadian of an American i- 
gi\ ing them. The\ will vary also with 
lnners and sellers of broadcast time, 
on liotli sides of the border. 

One leading American time! uyer re- 
plied with some irritation: "Because 
American broadcasters are too damned 
dumb!" 

From the parallel histories ol BBM 
and BMB. however, certain facls 
emerge: 

I. BBM has gained the support of 
more than 7-V , of Canada's 141 
AM stations, as well as 58 agen- 
cies and 41 advertisers. Thirteen 
id the agencies and two of the ad- 
vertisers — Campbell Soup and 
Miles Laboratories — are in the 



I nited Stale-. 

On the othei hand. BMB's Stud) 
No. I was supported b) about <V< 
i yon ,,t 900-plus \M stations in 
the I . S. in 1946), whereas its 
Stud) No. 2 is financed b) onl) 
about 2.V , i (.mi of the present 
2.n(»i \M stations). 

Canada as yet ha- no television 
stations, and onl) 35 KM stations, 
to "complicate the picture there. 
Ml stations of Canadian Broadcast- 
ing Corporation belong to BBM. 
2. Whereas charges of "waste" and 
"extravagance" have been leveled 
against BMB (which has expensive 
quarters on Park Avenue in New 
^ ork i. th.- BBM people saj th -\ 
have operated on the basis of strict- 
est economy. Nearl) all who work 
al BBM's Toronto headquarters 
contribute so man) hours a week 
to keeping BBM goin :. BBM has 
onl) a few | aid employes. 

Bui B vlB people will teil you thai 
one factor m BHMs "e-onom\ 
was thai in the ea I) daj s B rlB 
helped to keep BBM going !»\ buy- 
ing its da. a. Vlso, BMB in New 
^ ork continues to handle research 
and statistical work lor BBM. 
.'!. Perhaps BBM ha- 1 een abie to m ;e1 
the "gripes" ol broad :asters more 
effectivel) than has BMB. I.. E. 
I henner. president of BBM since 
1945 land president of Canadian 
Cellucotton Products Company), 
and such veteran associates as 01 n 
Bannerman and Adrian Head, have 
worked for years to keep BBM go- 
ing 1>\ keeping the broadcasters 
sold on it. Mr. Phenner. who re- 
cent!) was given a gold medal b) 
the Association of Canadian Adver- 
tisers for his work with BBM. or- 



leadership 



S E Et V f C Mi MPMMiECTO Mi Y 



V. 5. BECKER 
PRODUCTIONS 

Producers of television and radio pack- 
age snjws Rcpresenling talent of dis- 
tinction 
i62 5'h Ave . New York luxemberg 2- 10-0 



Directory Rates 
on request 



®mm 



- IN 



IN PROGRAMMING 
IN POPULARITY 
IN UTAH 






Salt Lake City, Utah 
National Repreienfalive: John Blair t Co. 



" VQNCOuveR flReir 



ask 

Join limit & Co. 

about tlio 

Hots & Martin 

STATIONS 

IN 

RICHMOND 

HCOI)-™ 



First Stations of Virginia 



16 JANUARY 1950 



51 




Hooper has good news 
for WMBD-CBS adver- 
tiser! The October-November, 
1949, Hooper station share of 
audience index for Peoria reveals: 

1 ) Morning 

(8:00-12:00) WMBD 49. 5 f , 
Monday-Friday 

2) Afternoon 

(12:00-6:00) WMBD 46.9', 
Monday-Friday 

3) Night 

(6:00-sign-off) WMBD 48. 8'< 
Sunday -Saturday 

WMBD is, of course, still the 
leading Peoria station — and with 
an increase over the March-April 
Hooper in every time segment! 
Thus WMBD Peoriarea domi- 
nance, plus outstanding CBS pro- 
gramming, again proves to be an 
effective blueprint for sales. 

Let WMBD-CBS carve « place for 
you tit the top of the totem pole! 

WMBD DOMINATES Peoriarea 




CBS AFFILIATE 
AM 5000 watts 
FM 20000 watts 



ganized the tripartite < ommittee 
two years before BUM made its 
first study. 

BBM s research and development 
committee weighs suggestions in: 
improvement in standards and serv- 
ices, and makes recommendations 
to the board of directors. 
4. Measurement of station coverage in 
Canada would appear to be sim- 
pler, because of fewer stations and 
less competition between them. 
Canada's 13,000,000 population 
(less than one-eleventh of the popu- 
lation of the I . S. I is scattered 
across 2.500 miles from Nova Sco- 
tia to British Columbia. ()nl\ 15 
"metropolitan areas" embrace oth- 
er municipalities, and only three — 
Montreal. Toronto and Vancouver 
are "primar) metropolitan 
areas." Nearly two-thirds of the 
population of all nine provinces is 
in Ontario and Quebec. 

(The 1950 study also will cover, 
for the first time. Canada's new 
10th province. Newfoundland. I 
However, as Honore Chevrier, re- 
search director of the Canadian Broad- 
casting < oi poration. and \ ii e-chail man 
of BBM s research and development 
committee, told SPONSOR, Canada con- 
fronts special language problems. 
"Four million Canadians." be said, 
"are of French extraction. These peo- 
ple have their own station listening 
habits. A large number of French Ca- 
nadians are bilingual, speaking Eng- 
lish as well as French, and listen both 
to their own and to the English lan- 
guage stations. Thus BBM must report 
b\ three language groups. 

The problem of station participation 
in BBM probablv is simplified b\ the 
fail that man) of the stations in the 
Dominion are owned b\ Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation. In the Unit- 
ed States no network or other single 
group ma) own more than seven sta- 
tions; no network numbers among its 
affiliates as much as one-fourth of all 
AM stations, and all four coast-to-coast 
networks together do not have as affili- 

. 1 1 • — ball "I all the Wl -tat ions now 

operating. 

BBM operates on an annual income 
of less than $100,000. Even so. in the 
years between the biennial -Indies — 
1010. f,»r example BBM is "slight!) 
in ihe red." This lo— is overcome in 
the "stud) years. 

But. he- added, "we've no surplus foi 
the Canadian tax authorities to worr) 
about." 



Because it costs less to send adver- 
tising messages over the air than to 
distribute them by mail or truck — es- 
peciail) to sparsely-settled areas — 
main Canadian advertisers have their 
own reasons for being sold on radio 
advertising, arid specifically on BBM s 
efforts to tell them about station cover- 
age. 

One large Canadian advertiser, who 
preferred not to be identified, pointed 
out that in the breadth of Canada, "a 
distance hundreds of miles greater than 
from New ^ ork to San Francisco, there 
are main small units of population 
wbirb must be reached b) small local 
radio stations, if at all. Because our 
population is small, we cannot afford 
to ignore scattered groups of people 
here and there that a national adver- 
tiser in the I nited Stale- mighl ver) 
well pass up. 

Advertising expenditures for this 
compan) s two principal products aver- 
ages $1 for every 60 people in Canada. 
"If in a certain area there is a popula- 
tion of 300,000," this advertiser said. 



VODKAN 
YOU VANT 

EEN 
MOSCOW 



(Ky.)? 



email to ""J Area is 

ssSBSSbaas 

;ubl«f«orthi»thw cha 

cause we dont have iu .,. t . 

£" ftrSSNRL » «-» 




52 



SPONSOR 



"presumably we can spend $5,000 in 
that area. The figures supplied by 
BBM help us to decide on what sta- 
tion or stations to spend the money 
allotted to radio advertising in that 
area.' 

The $l-for-60-people ratio, he ex- 
plained "represents more in Canada 
than it does in the I nited States. Al- 
though the population of the I nited 
States is onl\ 12 times that of Can- 
ada, the buying power of the United 
States is IB times as great. Fort) peo- 
ple in the I . S. could supply as much 
bu\ ing power as 60 in Canada. 

Hut advertisers and agenc) execu- 
tives in both countries agree on the 
continuing need for uniform and im- 
partial station coverage data. \\ it It 
competition increasing among broad- 
casters, and more competition from 
other media, they sa\ that the need 
today is greater than ever. 

America's BMB may be replaced by 
a membership corporation. Canada's 
BBM will continue to go its coopera- 
tive, tripartite way. * * * 



AIRLINES 

{Continued from page 29 1 

and newspaper efforts are being 
stepped up in 1950. 

Northeast's broadcasting response 
lias been especially good since it start- 
ed the "Yankee Fleet" as a singing 
commercial. This was taken from an 
old New England sea chantey, "A Yan- 
kee Ship with a Yankee Crew," and 
was appropriate for Northeast's "Yan- 
kee Fleet." The song has been sung 
ever networks, and the company's of- 
fices have been "deluged by requests 
for sheet music and records" of it. 

Until recently, "by far the greater 
proportion of our advertising budget 
was devoted to newspaper and maga- 
zine advertising," said Alfred M. Hur- 
son, vice-president for public relations 
of Colonial Airlines, Inc.. New York. 
"However, during November we ap- 
propriated about .$5,000 for a series of 
spot announcements on WJZ. New 
\ork. This is the first really concen- 
trated radio effort we have made. 

"We are more than pleased with re- 
sults." but the company had not yel 
had time to determine the percentage 
of inquiries being turned into sales, 
nor to compare them with newspaper 
and magazine inquiries." 

In 1948 Colonial bought a participa- 



tion in the television show Suing into 
Sports over \\ \BI>. New York. "This 
visual selling of our services to winter 
sports lovers." Mr. Hudson said, 
"helped us to get our story over. . . . 
We carried small 56-line ads on the 
sports pages of New ^ ork newspaper*, 
calling attention to the program and 
at the same time selling our service. 

National Airlines. Miami, intends to 
increase this year both its overall ad- 
vertising program and the radio-TV 
part of it. replied John M. Stoddard, 
assistant to the vice-president. Broad- 
casting, which in 1949 represented only 
1 per cent of the total, will lie stepped 



up to 7 1 •_. per cent. 

"Extremely favorable" results from 
spot broadcasting in test cities in 1949 
have led National to plan a consistent 
announcement campaign. Among sta- 
tions used have been those in cities 
served by National which are neai 
government installations, such as army 
camps and navy bases. Currently, the 
airline is participating in a tie-in with 
the New York Giants baseball club 
on WMCA, New York, promoting trav- 
el to the Mayfair Inn at Sanford. Fla. 

Delta Air Lines. Atlanta — which 
operates in the Southeast and north to 
Chicago — is now sponsoring an un- 



TWO 



CITIES -SOUTH BEND AND 
MISHAWAKA - ARE THE HEART OF 
THE SOUTH BEND MARKET 



The city of Mishawaka begins where the city of 
South Bend ends. They are separated only by a 
street. The two cities form a single, unified mar- 
ket of 157,000 people. 

Be sure to count both cities when you study 
this market. It makes a big difference. Here's 
how: in 1948, South Bend ranked 90th in the 
nation in food sales, with a total of $36,129,000. 
But when Mishawakas 1948 food sales are added, 
the total becomes $45,385,000— and South Bend- 
Mishawaka jumps to 69th place! A similar pic- 
ture is reflected in all other sales categories in 
this two-city market. 

Don't forget, either, that South Bend-Misha- 
waka is only the heart of the South Bend market. 
The entire market includes over half-a-million 
people who spent more than half-a-biffion dollars 
on retail purchases in 1948. 

And only WSBT covers all of this market. 



WSBT duplicates its entirt 
schedule on WSBT-FM—at 
no extra cost to advertisers. 




PAUL H. 



5000 WATTS • 960 KC • CBS 
RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



16 JANUARY 1950 



53 



usual, daily 15-minute newscast on 

WCON, \tlanta. and expects to start 
telecasting on \\ COVIN when that 
station goes on the air. probably in 
March. 

The newscasts, explained James II. 
Cobb Jr.. public relations and advertis- 
ing director, are "'actual taped inter- 
views with passengers, made in flight. 
and replayed as the middle commer- 
cial." The interviews are made bv 
Newscaster Don Elliott, who gets a 
two-month suppl) from one round-trip 
between Atlanta and Chicago. 

Delta also uses announcements in 
Birmingham and New Orleans. Cur- 



rently, it sponsors spots on WSB-TV. 
Atlanta, and it has used TV in Chi- 
cago, Dallas, New Orleans and Miami. 
These spots are one-minute movies, 
with sound on film, showing passen- 
gers boarding a Delta- DC-6, being 
made comfortable bv a stewardess, en- 
joying a meal . . . and then enjoying 
themselves at their destination. 

"We believe television is especially 
well suited to travel advertising. Mr. 
Cobb pointed out. "and we expect to 
make increased use of this medium as 
audiences multiplv. 

RranifT International Airways. Dal- 
las, sponsored telecasts of several news 



Jet WIBW fif/your SaL Sdol 



Sales Managers! Here's a tip from 
Kansas farmers. These far-sighted 
operators depend on ensilage (the 
stuff that's stored in silos) to keep 
livestock growing when there's a 
shortage of green stuff. 

Incidentally, there's no shortage of 
green stuff — money, that is — in 
vVIBW's five-state farm audience. 
You can count on immediate sales 
when you use WIBW. 

At the same time, you'll be filling 
your sales silo with name preference 
and built-up demand for your prod- 
uct. You II find this mighty valuable 
in keeping your sales growing — espe- 
cially during seasons that are nor- 
mally "off. ' 

Let WIBW Fill Your Sales Silo 




programs in 1949. an executive said, 
"but radio advertising has still to be 
considered in connection with our in- 
ternational advertising program. 

Some aviation executives implied 
that the railroads were merely cutting 
their own throats by accepting recent 
fare increases. Kenneth E. Allen, ad- 
vertising and publicit) director of 
Western Air Lines. Los Angeles, ex- 
pressed the belief that "we have in our 
familv plan and coach service two 
good price appeal elements which can 
outsell the railroads any day in the 
week, regardless of the relative prox- 
imity of fares." 

Western uses spot radio for such 
appeals and recently has been buying 
strip radio on "numerous disc jockey 
shows on independent stations." Mr. 
Mien said. "It is too earh to tell the 
drawing power of such shows, but we 
are confident it is going to show some 
good inquiry results." 

An executive of pan American \\ 01 Id 
Airways said that "our use of radio 
and television has been so meager that 
we cannot contribute anything of tan- 
gible value." 

But Pan Am. T\\ \ and other over- 
seas lines are expected to step up pro- 
motion sharplj lo attract some of the 




rfucUeace 



Ort.-Nov. 1949 
MORNING 42.8 

AFTERNOON 36.1 



EVENINC 



29.6 



First By Far! 



Rep : CAPPER PUBLICATIONS, Inc. • BEN LUDY, Gen. Mqr. • WIBW • KCKN 



WFBL 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Represented by 
FREE & PETERS, INC. 



54 



SPONSOR 



scores of thousands who will go to 
Rome for the Holy Year abservance. 
The American lines also are promot- 
ing both reduced fares abroad and 
bigger spending power of the Ameri- 
can dollar when one gets there. 

Meanwhile, in this country, many 
airlines, such as Capital, regard the 
railroad fare increase as opening "a 
new market for air coach passengers 
on the scheduled airlines of the coun- 
try." J. H. Carmichael. president of 
Capital Airlines. Washington, said 
that, as a result, "the air coach has be- 
come the closest price competitor to 
bus transportation. " Capital intends to 
make promotional capital of it. 

More smaller airlines also are ag- 
gressive, promotionally. John V. Wees- 
ner, president of Nationwide Airlines, 
Inc., Detroit I which serves only Michi- 
gan I , reported that "our spot an- 
nouncements now represent approxi- 
mately one-quarter of our total adver- 
tising budget." * * * 



CO-OP 

(Continued from page 34) 

"Residents of Conshohocken will find 
a full line of Blank washing machines 
at Fred's Appliance Store, 212 Main 
Street." Other Blank dealers might 
get a plug on other days, but all the 
plugs are alike. The big reason for 
this uniformity is the section of the 
Robinson-Patman Act which says that 
a manufacturer must not discriminate 
among his dealers — that is. whatever 
he offers one must be offered all others. 

Proponents of the simplified ap- 
proach to dealer co-ops suggest the fol- 
lowing method of strengthening the 
sales message at the individual level 
without circumventing the letter or 
spirit of the Robinson-Patman Act. 
Let the manufacturer prepare several 
identical lines of copy for each dealer. 
Then make this stipulation: "Thes» 
two lines of copy about my product 
must be included in your local an- 
nouncement if you want to share in 
our co-op plan. As long as you've used 
this <op\ verbatim, you're on \our 
own. with no strings attached." 

At that point the dealer can write 
his own commercial, making it as lo- 
cal and individual as he likes. His 
aim. of course, is to persuade listeners 
to buy their Blank washer from him 
rather than from a competing dealer. 
It is understood, of course, that in 



shaping the commercial to his own re- 
quirements he will do nothing to dis- 
tort the manufacturer's several lines of 
copy, or to weaken its punch. 

Such an arrangement would do 
much to nourish good-will between 
dealer and manufacturer, in addition 
to its other virtues. Under the present 
setup many dealers are "going along 
with the herd" only reluctantly, and 
not with any conviction that they per- 
sonally will benefit from the arrange- 
ment. More serious, from the national 
merchandiser's viewpoint, is the feel- 
ing among some dealers that their con- 



tribution to co-op funds is really a 
"gouge," with the manufacturer riding 
the gravy train. 

Certainly no manufacturer sets up a 
co-op campaign with the intention of 
"shaking down" his dealers. Nonethe- 
less, the disgruntled dealers have a 
point — one which goes back to the in- 
flexibility of the copy that is handed 
to them. Even though prepared with 
the purest intention, the average co-op 
announcement gives the national 
brand-name a much better break than 
the dealer who handles it. This obvi- 
ously implies a shortsighted outlook if 



Winston-Salem's 




Station 




IN LISTENING (Hooper) 

IN NETWORK (NBC) 

IN POWER (5000 WATTS) 

ON THE DIAL (600) 
ON THE AIR (1930) 



Your FIRST and BEST Buy! 



Affiliated with 
NBC 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (J) 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY YEAR 



Represented by 
iHeadley-Reed Co. 



16 JANUARY 1950 



55 



one considers that the avowed purpose 
of dealer co-op advertising is to move 
the product from dealer to customer. 
Its purpose is not primarily to create 
demand: that's the job of national ad- 
vertising. It's true that the two forms 
mn>t necessaril) overlap, to a degree. 
Hut to earmark funds for a sales pitch 
at the dealer level and then to delegate 
the dealer to second fiddle in the com- 
mercial is obviously muddled mer- 
chandising — aside from the fact that 
it peeves the dealer. 

One big reason for the general con- 
fusion about dealer co-ops is the sur- 
prising lack of information, all along 
the line from manufacturer to distribu- 
tor to dealer, on how they are sup- 
posed to operate. The NAB's Broad- 
cast Advertising Bureau has taken 
some monumental strides toward clari- 
fying the situation. BAB's position on 
co-ops is objective. Being a part of 
the broadcasting industry, the Bureau 
is working for the best interests of 
radio advertising in general, and does 
not recommend one type of radio buy 
over another. But in every instance 
where a co-op program is in operation 
or is contemplated. BAB has been on 



Mr. Advertiser: 

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with 

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26 30-Min. Dramatic Programs 

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hand to present radios case for inclu- 
sion in the campaign. 

The chart which accompanies this 
article represents a digest, by product 
categories, of co-op information BAB 
has collected as part of its service to 
advertisers and stations. The chart 
represents most of the dealer co-op 
"case histories'' that BAB had com- 
piled at this writing, with other re- 
ports coming in steadily, sponsor's 
chart does not purport to be the com- 
plete national picture of co-op adver- 
tising. But it is extensive enough and 
sufficiently representative to support 
some conclusions about who's doing 
what in radio co-op advertising. 

Co-op advertisers tend to conform 
to one of three general patterns in al- 
locating their radio funds — the Straight 
Split, the Three-Way Split, and the 
Percentage Limitation. The first type 
is a down-the-middle division of costs, 
with the manufacturer paying 50% 
and the dealer paying 50%. The great 
majority of co-op deals fall into this 
category, as the adjoining chart illus- 
trates. Columbia Records. Zenith Ra- 
dio. U. S. Machine Corp. and Ameri- 
can Stove Company are examples of 
this breakdown. 

Under the Three-Way Split, costs 
are shared in varying ratios by dealer, 
manufacturer, and distributor. The 
most popular formula in this bracket 
is manufacturer 25%, distributor, 
25%, and dealer 50%. Typical users 
are the York Corporation, air-condi- 
tioning and refrigeration-equipment; 
Radio Corp. of America, RCA Victor 
Radios, phonographs, combinations, 
records and television sets; and York- 
Shipley, Inc., oil burners and furnaces. 
The other three-way split most fre- 
quently encountered is: manufacturer 
30%, distributor 20%, and dealer 
50%. The Stromberg-Carlson Co. uses 
this plan for dealer-advertising its 
radio and TV sets. 

There are a substantial number of 
cases where other types of three-way 
splits have been worked out to fit in- 
dividual needs. Deepfreeze Division, 
Motor Products Corp.. for example, 
splits it this way: manufacturer, 
.'.'.' ;',. distributor I (»-.;',. dealer 
50^. Noblitt-Sparks Industries, Inc., 
Arvin radios, heaters., appliances, of- 
fers the following formula: dealer 
50%, distributor 10%, \rvin Factory 

Fund. 40%. 

The other basic form of co-op cost 
split is the Percentage Limitation. In 
this setup the manufacturer bases a 



dealer s advertising allowance on a 
percentage of his purchases by dollar 
volume during a calendar year. Un- 
der the Gruen Watch Company's plan, 
the percentage varies from 2' < for an 
annual volume of less than $15,000, to 
8% of purchases of $500,000 and 
over, with a graduated scale between 
those extremes. The Elgin National 
Watch Co. has a similar plan, starting 
with minimum purchases of $1500 a 
year. 

Closely related to the Percentage 
Limitation plan is the Unit Allowance 
arrangement, used extensively by the 
major appliance manufacturers. Serv- 
el. Inc.. follows this plan: manufac- 
turer 331/3%, dealer and distributor 
66% f ; . with the proviso that the max- 
imum expenditure by the manufactur- 
er will be $2 per refrigerator purchased 
by the dealer, and 50c to $2 per water 
heater, depending on the model. The 
Ironrite Ironer Co., with a straight 50- 
50 split, sets up its co-op fund on the 
basis of $3 per ironer purchased by 
the dealer. The dealer must match 
this, which makes a total of $6 to be 
spent locally for promotion for each 
ironer delivered to the dealer. 

Another type of co-op advertising 
used by several manufacturers on a 
small scale is the so-called "Factory 
Help" plan, in which the manufactur- 
er contributes no money but instead 
furnishes prepared advertising materi- 
al. Auto-Lite sends stations 15-minute 
transcriptions of a program called 
Gasoline Alley, together with a list of 
local Auto-Lite distributors. Window 
streamers and other point-of-sale ma- 
terial are also available. On the same 
basis, the Anderson Company sends 
stations five-minute transcriptions for 
its Anco windshield wiper blades. 

Most co-op advertisers who use 
radio are very specific about the type 
of radio advertising they approve, stat- 
ing whether live or transcribed an- 
nouncements are preferred, and care- 
fully outlining copy limitations. Most 
of them point out in no uncertain 
terms thai they will share costs only of 
announcements devoted exclusively to 
their own products. 

The wide diversity of advertisers 
who are using co-op radio is evident 
from a glance at the chart drawn from 
the BAB index cards. While a pre- 
ponderance of co-op money is invested 
in the appliance and home equipment 
fields, there is no limiting categorical 
factor. Colgate-Palmolivc-Peet uses co- 
op to sell tooth powder, Goodrich uses 
it for tires and tubes. Devoe & Rav- 



56 



SPONSOR 





199 




TV RESULTS 




First it was 83 




TV RESULTS, 




then we published 




99 TV RESULTS. 




So far. we've exhausted 




three printings. 




The fourth will be 




199 TV RESULTS, and will 




be fully eategorized 




and indexed for 




day-to-day use. You'll 




love this one,* even 




more than you did the others. 


*We're accepting limited advertis- 
ing with 11 10 February deadline. 
Regular insertion rates apply. Ad- 


SPONSOR 


vertising was nol available in 




previous TV RESULTS booklets. 

i 


510 Madison Avenue, New York 22 



N- SALEM 




How To Put A Client Out 
Of Business 

A WAIRadio client had sev- 
eral hundred surplus trousers 
to sell. One announcement 
over WAIRadio at 6:45 AM 
sold entire stock by 10:30 
AM. Advertising cost less 
than one cent per garment. 
With new, larger stock, this 
merchant is again using 
WAIRadio sales magic. 

National Rep: Avery-Knodel, Inc. 




NORTH CAROLINA 



BMI 

SIMPLE ARITHMETIC 

IN 

MUSIC LICENSING 

BMI LICENSEES 

Networks 23 

AM 2.046 

FM 407 

TV 89 

Short-Wave 4 

Canada 150 

TOTAL BMI 

LICENSEES 



2,719 



You are assured of 
complete coverage 
when you program 
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BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



nolds uses it for paints and varnishes. 
Even though there is no common 
denominator, product-wise, for the 
bu\er of co-op radio advertising, there 
are several important factors which 
all such advertisers should hear in 
mind in order to get the best results 
from their co-op dollar. The first of 
these is simplicity — too many co-op 
plans are cluttered with non-essential 
elements which slow down the machin- 
ery, while adding to the cost. The sec- 
ond is flexibility — tailor the plan to the 
individual situation; its unreasonable 
to expect a single plan to work success- 
tullv for hundreds or thousands of 
dealers in all sections of the country. 
The third requisite is follow-through — 
perhaps no form of advertising de- 
mands closer supervision at every lev- 
el; there are any number of directions 
in which it can go haywire without 
proper guidance. The fourth is infor- 
mation — once a co-op plan is organ- 
ized, don't keep the details a secret. 
The better informed all parties con- 
cerned, the better it will work for 
them. * * * 



NETWORK PACKAGES 

{Continued from page 23 I 

man of 1947 and seems still happ) 
with it. 

Not all network packaging experi- 
ences have happy endings. Last sum- 
mer, for instance, NBC spent a total 
of $423,923 for packages, and the re- 
turn as yet is not at all satisfactory in 
terms of dollars. Hut — and here is the 
big modifier — NBC is not discouraged. 
It's going right ahead, spending more 
hundreds of thousands. For the sum- 
mer of 1950. NBC already has lined 
up a total "I 32 packages on a "hang 
the cost" basis. None of these new 
NBC shows will be overly-expensive. 
All will be budgeted at under $10,000 
a week most of them falling into the 
$5,000-a-week or under class. But. all 
in all. NBC will spend at least $500,- 

000 on these packages. 

On ever) one ol the lour major net- 
works clients can now. and will in- 
creasingl) be able to, l>u\ packages 
thai have the following advantages: 

ili A network package show has 
the bug- taken out of it before it is 
sold. It i- "tested and weeded." 

(2) It has a rating history. The 
client or agenc) doc- not have to guess 
what the show imn do on the air; il 



buys on the basis of what the show 
fias done. The audience has been 
built; in most cases, the time-slot has 
been fixed to the show. 

(3) The client is sure that the net- 
work will give a net-owned or con- 
trolled package a lot of extra ingredi- 
ents. These may include a larger or- 
chestra, extra cast, and certainly extra 
push and promotion. 

(4) The client is sure of the price. 
Since the network owns or controls the 
package, there is no doubt as to wheth- 
er the price will vary greatly. Both 
ad agencies and clients welcome a deal 
where the financial headaches are kept 
to a minimum. As clients shift gears 
into television, this factor becomes 
even more important, because in video 
there are so many possibilities for "ex- 
tras" — an extra lightman. extras for 
sets, extras for rights to certain liter- 
ary properties, etc., etc. 

After reading all this a client or 
agency may come up with his own 
$64 query : "Why are the networks do- 
ing it? Are they philanthropists?" 

The answer is: "No." True, when a 
client buys a network package in which 
the chain has invested $100,000 and 
the client pays only so much a week, 
the 100-G is the network's "loss." But 
it's only a bookkeeping minus. The 
CBS chief was smart enough to see 
that when he laid down "Paley's Law" 
of "control . . . content . . . competi- 
tion." 

When a network sells its own pack- 
age, it gains in four ways: 

I 1 I The show will stay on its net- 
work. It will not be built up. get audi- 
ence confidence, develop stars — and 
then find the client shifting the show to 
a competing network. The show is 
tied to the network. 

1 2 ) The network is interested not 
only in selling one time-slot, but in 
selling all time-slots. That means the 
network must worn about adjacencies. 
It mav want to build "mood" program- 
ing. It max seek a certain balance on 
certain nights. If the network ties the 
package to a definite time-slot on a 
definite night it controls the schedule, 
retains whatever '"mood" it wants, and 
helps the -hows preceding and follow- 
ing the net's ow n package. 

ill Owning a number of packages 
gives the network the opportunity to 
hire, or retain, better manpower. This 
i- true whether that manpower is on 

the commercial side, the technical, or 

the .uti-tic. For instance. \BC just 
recenth hired four writers to work on 



58 



SPONSOR 



its own packages. Those writers will 
be Oil hand for whatever other duties 
the network might want to allot. 

(4) There is one additional advan- 
tage. The network, by tying up its 
own packages, ties up stars and fea- 
tured players who are available for 
big public functions as emcees, guest 
stars, etc. The networks know they 
need the publics good-will. More net- 
work-owned, network-originated, or 
network - controlled packages — mean 
more, and better, public good-will. 

A check among advertising agencv 
executives shows that most agencies ap- 
preciate the new situation. Several 
agency heads were willing to discuss 
the subject. None, however, was will- 
ing to be quoted by name. The ad 
men told SPONSOR they like many 
things about network package pro- 
graming. But they are not willing to 
put themselves in the position where, 
tomorrow, their client may say to 
them: "Why should I buy your show, 
when you yourself said that the net- 
work packages are a better buy?" 

One agency man handling radio and 
television pointed out that he not only 
likes network packages but helps the 
networks build them. Referring to a 



Bait Map Copyright 
Noblr & Swart, Inc. 




21 rivh 1 'ontral \t-§r York 
i ounlivs • 20.1*000 It Mil 
Station Audionw Families 

ACUSE 

AM-FM-TV 

NBC Affiliate in Central New York 

HEADLEY REED, National Representatives 




show that went on television recently 
(verj successfully ) he said he had 
prescribed ever\ major ingredient that 
went into the program. Having done 
so, the ad-man was willing to let the 
network own the program. "But." he 
said. "I got first crack at it. of course. 
and I knew what I was getting, includ- 
ing just how much it would cost me." 

What th i> man said was echoed bv 
others sponsor interviewed. Agency 
executives are not throwing away their 
privilege of building shows — but they 
are quite happv to let the networks do 
the job, as long as they get good, tried, 
tested shows for their clients. 

Agency men pointed to good buys 
on every one of the networks. CBS no 
longer has the monopoly in the field 
Mutual's Frank White and Bill Fine- 
shriber — having been in on the formu 
lation of "Paley's Law" - have made 
good use of the principles themselves. 
Kintner's interest in program building 
is well known. Trammell goes to town 
without old inhibitions — as the new 
spirit blowing through NBC reveals 
new spending, new courage, and new 
imagination. The program-makers and 
the super-salesmen have something to 
sell. 

They have not only programs ac- 
tuallv on platters taken from previous 
airings or from auditions, but many 
more on the script editors', program 
directors" and salesmen's desks. Each 
of the four major nets has an average 
of fifty such tailor-made jobs — and the 
know-how to build many more. Of this 
total, at NBC alone the buyer will find 
at least 27 programs on records — in- 
cluding 12 from the 1949 summer- 
hiatus crop, and 15 of the 32 sched- 
uled for the summer of 1950. CBS 
has an immediate availability of 41. 
every one of them recorded. But both 
these organizations — as well as Mutual 
and ABC where no accurate count was 
immediately at hand — have any num- 
ber of other good, saleable items on 
their shelves. All the sponsor — or his 
agency — need do is to ask that the 
"goods" be shown. 

The immediate advantages will be 
the sponsor's — because he can, and 
will be able, increasingly, to buy im- 
portant network shows on which "the 
other fellow'" made the heavy initial 
investment and provided the buildup. 
But the networks stand to gain, and 
they know it. Some have gained in . 
the past year or two. In 1950. they'll 
spend more — but will sell more too. 

• • * 




Keep Your 

OMAHA-DES MOINES 

Sales On An 

"EVEN KEEL" 

with 

KMA 

Shenandoah, Iowa 

Our BMB Area is 184 Counties in 
Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and Mis- 
souri. The dominant trade centers 
for this area are Omaha and Des 
Moines. 

HOWEVER .... 

73.2% of this population live on 
farms or in small towns (under 
10,000 population). Conlan and 
mail pull prove KMA is the domi- 
nant station in this rural and small 
town area. Withoul KMA you lose 
impact, miss the prosperous farm 
and small town families. 

AND 

we mean prosperoux! Iowa-Nebras- 
ka Agricultural Income Increase, 
1418 over l'MT. wax the highest in 
the nation. The 1949 estimate indi- 
cates another increase due to larg- 
er marketings, veterans' bonus. 

Get All the Facts From 

Avery-Knodel, Inc. 
National Representatives 

KMA 

Shenandoah, Iowa 




16 JANUARY 1950 



59 



THE WAY BACK 

{Continued from page 25) 

the case, when a watch is brought in 
for repair, so that the hand or bracelet 
looks tawdry in comparison. 

There are many other such merchan- 
dising gimmicks — every trade has its 
own. There's nothing new about the 
technique of creating public conscious- 
ness of one item or another. It's been 
done with heels, with suspenders, with 
belts. But it had never been tried with 
watchbands until Speidel's experiment 
—which Bretton-Ritter shrewdly emu- 
lated, with many added wrinkles and 
refinements. 

It's interesting to note the points of 
similarity — and of dissimilarity — in 
the approach to radio of Bruner-Ritter 
and of Spcidel. Both chose the same 
network — ABC; the same night — Sun- 
da \ ; and the same general type of 
show— audience participation-give- 
away. Spcidel has a quarter-hour par- 
ticipation in Stop the Music. Bruner- 
Ritter. however, lias a half-hour show 
of its own — Chance of a Lifetime. 

Once the latter firm decided on ra- 
dio, little time was lost in implement- 
ing the decision. After scanning net- 



work availability. Bruner-Ritter bought 
the 9.30-10 time slot on ABC Sunday 
night — a solid choice, since it follows 
\\ alter \\ inchell and Louella Parsons. 
\t the same time, Bruner-Ritter bought 
the rights to an ABC package show 
called Go for the House. This was a 
giveaway m.c.'d by John Reed King. 
The show had been on as a sustainer 
for about a year, but had not made 
much of a stir and acquired only a 
mediocre rating. 

At this point Bruner-Ritter changed 
agencies — the account was given to the 
Raymond Spector Co. The agency's 
president is an old hand at radio, and 
this fact undoubtedly had much to do 
with the appointment. Saul Ritter, 
Marvin Bruner, and Ray Spector did a 
demolition job on the rickety "House" 
package and in its place built Chance 
of a Lifetime. 

Said show, its creators feel, has more 
point, and because of that more selling 
power, than the average giveaway pro- 
gram. They have no fault to find with 
shows that shower contestants with 
mink bathmats or gold-plated lawn- 
mowers. But Bruner-Ritter feels that 
its show is getting somewhat closer to 
realit\ and everyday life with the 



WAIT holds the fort in 
Garrison ( iowa) 




. . . with exclusive CBS program 
ming in Eastern Iowa . . . with 
extra ammunition in the form of 
complete news coverage via AP, 
UP, INS, and local correspondents 
throughout the state . . . with long 
range signal strength on Iowa's 
best frequency, GOO kc. 

There are no tremendous cities 
in WMT-land — just hundreds of 
small ones like Garrison with a 
combined population (within our 
2.. r > niv line) greater than any other 
station's in Iowa. It's an audience 
worth laying siege to. Ask the 
Katz man to shoot over the details. 




XWN*.NVi\.VJ. 



WMT 

CEDAR RAPIDS 

5000 Watts 600 K.C. Day & Night 
BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 



M>w our, gr^vi YeAK,! 



Chance of a Lifetime jackpot prize — a 
handsomely furnished house "built for 
you in any community of your choice," 
and surrounded by its own lot. This 
and other weekly prizes are donated by 
the manufacturers, of course. 

Before the show was launched in 
September, Bruner-Ritter began a vig- 
orous promotional supporting cam- 
paign aimed at the 300 wholesale Jew- 
elry dealers who supply some 26,000 
retail jewelry stores which carry the 
Bretton line. The first volley in this 
merchandising broadside was a color- 
ful brochure describing Chance of a 
Lifetime and summing up thus its value 
to the dealer: "You know, and na- 
tional surveys prove, that more people 
buy watchbands than any other single 
item in jewelry stores! Obviously, any 
plan that increases watch band traffic 
2 to 3 times, doubles and triples oppor- 
tunities to sell highpriced, high-profit 
watches, rings, silverware, etc. NOW— 
at last — here's a unique plan, a dv- 
namic plan, that will do just that! 
It's sparked by . . . the most spec- 
tacular radio program in jewelry his- 
tory!" 

This optimistic trumpet blast was 
not mere wind, as it turned out. The 
year 1948 was a good one for Bruner- 
Ritter. profit-wise. But the first six 
months of 1949 were grim — sales for 
the first six months were 2.V i below 
the year before. Chance of a Lifetime 
went on the air in September, and 
Bruner Ritter finished 1949 "substan- 
tial ahead" of 1948 — making up that 
big deficit and then some. Bruner and 
Hitter believe they were the only jewel- 
ers in the U. S. who improved their 
1949 business over the year before — 
and credit this almost solely to their 
radio campaign. 

"Six months ago." said Bruner. "no- 
body, but nobody, asked for a Bretton 
watchband b\ name." Today, he de- 
clared. (i()' , id all watchbands are sold 
by name; of that total, seven of each 
ten sold are Spcidel and three are Bret- 
ton. The ratio is a ver\ healthy one. 
Bruner feels, when one considers that 
Breton started from scratch in brand- 
name selling. 

Bruner-Ritter's merchandising sup- 
port ol their radio infant was not lim- 
ited to rosy-colored brochures. The 
coinpam was galvanized from top to 
bottom into a lather of activity, out 
ill which came new product and pack- 
age design, the issuance of guarantee 
bonds, greatl) widened use of display 
material, and extensive publicity. 



GO 



SPONSOR 



Bruncr and Hitter are convinced that 
their success in radio, striking and 
gratifying!) prompt though it has been, 
is still on the upgrade. They feel that. 
al present sales rates, the watchband 
market will be doubled two years from 
now. The company is planning to ex- 
pand its radio investment accordingly. 
Already the greater part of the firm's 
$1,000,000 annual advertising budget 
is invested in radio, with only a resid- 
ual $200,000 going toward trade pub- 
lication advertising. 

Near the top of their agenda are 
plans for "simulcasting" their radio 
show — Chance of a Lifetime was de- 
signed originally with an eye to even- 
tual duplication on television. Earlv 
next month Bruner-Ritter will inaugu- 
rate a new radio show in Canada. (A 
Canadian ban on giveaway precludes 
piping the ABC show across the bor- 
der, and so some format changes are 
anticipated.) 

Bruner-Ritter s regard for its hottest 
competitor. Speidel. is undiminished. 
Relations between the rival firms are 
so amicable that salesmen for each 
refer to the other company in their 
respective sales presentations by name 
and with nothing but kind words — an 
uncommon thing in the hard-bitten 
jewelry business. Anytime a competitor 
can push it into a venture as profitable 
as radio, all that Bruner-Ritter will 
need is a nudge. • * • 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

I Continued from page 43) 

two groups represented only 18% of 
our stations, they accounted for over 
~>.V,' of the revenues of all broadcast- 
ing stations in the country. 

Television development will continue 
to occur more frequently and to ex- 
pand most rapidly in our largest mar- 
kets; from there it will spread to other 
major markets and the resulting struc- 
ture will stabilize an increase in ad- 
vertising effectiveness substantial I >«'- 
fore any widespread growth occurs in 
our smaller market areas. This v\ill not 
detract one iota from the value of tele- 
vision as an advertising medium, for 
the opportunities to be seized in our 
major markets are sufficiently large 
and the probability of rate is sufficient- 
ly great to challenge private enterprise 
to television development. 

If the above reasoning is correct, the 



likelihood of networks, stations and ad- 
vertisers being faced with Dr. I' aught s 
hypothetical annual si. 7 billion dollar 
dilemma in the predictable future is 
practicallv non-existent. Much more 
likelv is the development of facilities 
roughlv paralleling revenue potentiali- 
ties, although the entreprenuel risks of 
networks and of station owners in TV 
undoubtedly will be considerably high 
er than thev were in the fine, free-rid- 
ing days of early radio. 

A word about Dr. Faughl's "box of- 



fice thesis. As I remember the vari 
ous unsuccessful attempts at wired ra- 
dio in this country, now extending tvw, 
decades, I am convinced that such tele- 
vision service would be out of context 
with American habits and ways of 
thinking. I doubt, therefore, whether 
it ever could be made a "'salable emu 
moditv ." 

Hkkmw S. Hkttincer 
Associate Director 
of Research 
McCann-Erickson, A . ) . 




NRB'S "RADIO CAMPAIGNS 
AND SALES KIT" is a 
COMPLETE SERVICE 
for all STATION OPERATORS 



[shpeming, Michigan 
November 5, L949. 



NATIONAL RESEARCH BUREAU, INC. 
MM', Building 
Chicago 10, Illinois. 

i tentlemen : 

During the past, we have tried many continuity services 
and after experimenting, we found that NRB is the most 
complete one of them all. We, here at WJPD, especially 
enjoy the wide range that it covers. NRB offers every- 
thing from Programming and Sales Ideas to chatter for 
earlv morning programs. And, of course, there's the won- 
derful selection of continuity to choose from. This is the 
most helpful aid for writing spots that we have ever had 
the pleasure to use. 

Congratulation- on your fine service! 

Very sincerely. 



Lois Holmgren 
Women's Program Director 



One more reason for using NRB's 
"Radio Campaigns and Sales Kit" 



Complete Coverage of Sales Programming & Continuity. 

Write today for further particulars on NRB's "Radio Cam- 
paigns and Sales Kit" now - being used by more radio stations 
than all other services combined. The coupon mailed today 
will bring you a sample copy of this money making COM- 

I'l.KTK radio service. 



TO: The NATIONAL RESEARCH BUREAU, INC., 
NRB Building, Chicago 10, Illinois 

Please send us a free sample and further particulars oi 
your NRB "Radio Campaigns & Sales Kit." 

My Name Title 

Station City & State 




16 JANUARY 1950 



61 




200,000,000 hours 

You can't laugh off 200,000,000 

hours. 

A. C. Nielsen estimates that Ameri- 
cans spend 198.000.000 hours daily 
listening to home radios. 

Add a conservative 2.D( H I.IH HI hours 
for daily out-of-home listening and you 
hit the 200.000.000 mark. 

That gives you a fresh approach to 
the importance of radio on the na- 
tional scene. T. J. Flanagan, livewire 
managing director of the National As- 
sociation of Radio Station Represen- 
tatives, suggests that the radio indus- 
tr\ cash in on its popularitv bv usini: 
the 200.000.000 in some phrase that 
will register with advertisers. 

V\ e re game. 

But who s got the right phrase? 
Suggestions are welcome and we'll 
publicize the best. 

If some genius can figure out a wax 
to write 200,000,000 on an abbreviated 
basis we'd relish that. too. 



Lightning That Talks 

\\ hen the All-Radio Presentation 
Film. Lightning That Talks, is pre- 
miered before 1.000 or more leader?- 
of the nation in New York the first of 
March, a new era will begin for radio 
advertising. 

For the first time hundreds of big 
business executives will be introduced 
to the commercial importance of a 
great advertising medium. And with a 
positiveness and logic that will serve as 
bedrock for individual presentations to 
come. 

The radio advertising industrv has 
shortchanged national advertisers In 
its lack of suitable presentation materi- 
al for top executives. Long ago the 
polk \ of rarel\ approaching the ad- 
vertiser himself was established: a 
policy partially developed by scarcity 
of proper presentation data, a policy 
at variance with the practices of other 
important advertising media. 

Lightning That Talks is the common- 
sense rectification. 

W e say this with the knowledge that 
Lightning That Talks is a unique film. 
W e know enough about it to say that 
its impact will surprise even its most 
rabid enthusiasts. 

W e urge the men who look to ad- 
vertising to make their businesses 
more productive to see Lightning That 
Talks, either at the Waldorf-Astoria 
showing or at others to be held in 
even section of the I nited States. 

Railroads, air lines, and air time 

sponsor has now completed its re- 
port on the use of broadcast advertis- 
ing by the railroads and the air lines. 

Aside from sporadic announce- 
ment campaigns, the brunt of rail- 



load radio advertising is borne b% 
the American Association of Railroads' 
"Railroad Hour" over NBC. Last sea- 
son the program was 45 minutes week- 
ly over ABC. This season it is reduced 
to 30 minutes. About 15' , of the 
railroad-' small S25.(HHUHMI advertis- 
ing appropriation goes to radio and 
television. 

Vside from a newscast over W CON 
and a telecast over W SB-T\ . both 
Atlanta, sponsor's study failed to 
reveal anything beyond announce- 
ments carried by any of the airline-. 
TWA put 25', of its total budget 
into radio announcements last vear 
and plans to continue. On the other 
hand. American \irlines. largest of 
domestic carriers, uses practically no 
radio. And second-place L nited Air 
Lines, whose radio use is light and 
spotty, finds it possible to get free 
time via its regular commentator- 
type release to radio stations. "Avia- 
tion in the News." 

The newspapers da\ after dav carrv 
an impressive bulk of airline advertise- 
ments. Transoceanic lines, such as the 
mammoth Pan American and K.LM 
i Dutch Air Lines), report little air ad- 
vertising if any. 

Each field of industrv is influenced 
by precedent. The strong suspicion ex- 
ists that radio has not sold itself either 
to the railroads or air lines. The prece- 
dent has never been established. 

The railroads and airlines i and the 
buslines as well i are watching televi- 
sion carefullv. As one air lines official 
put it. "We're intrigued with the pos- 
sibilities of showing what places look 
like." We'll be surprised if 1950 
d" -n't develop into a big year for tele- 
vision travel advertising. 



Applause 



Open season on Transit Radio 

The radio industry is indebted to 
Radio Station \\ \\ DC and Transit 
Radio of Washington, which succi — 
fullv defended its bus and street i ai 
franchise before the Di-tri< t of Colum- 
bia Public I tilitie- Commission. 

\\ ith a precedent established, the 
danger to Transit Radio in other .t 
is appreciabl) lessened. 

For some time it has been apparent 
that printed media don't welcome the 



encroachment of more broadcast com- 
petition, and arc out to fight it. Both 
in Washington and New x oik (where 
the Grand Central Terminal just an- 
nounced it- decision to '.unci its re- 
centlv inaugurated hmad< a-t- i black- 
and-white interests spearheaded the at- 
ta< ks. 

On December 21 the New York Her- 
ald Tribune editorialized: "There is. 
we think, something to be said for the 
W ashington protestant who foresaw the 
rein of rolling juke boxes. In a sum- 



mer of open bus window-, and street 
corner stops, the bus radio can be ex- 
pected to invade sidewalks and home-, 
in town <>r countrv . 

We think that the Herald Tribune 
meant "rain" instead of "rein." But 
cither way, it- reasoning is all wet. 

Most of the protests have been so 
obviouslj "planted" that it isn't diffi- 
< ult to detect the inconsistencies. \- 
a result of the W ashington action other 
Transit Radio group- will be in a bet- 
ter po-ition to defend themselves. 



62 



SPONSOR 



'earned un, 





SERVICE 




EVAN 



The KMBC-KFRM Team fulfills a vital daily 
need in thousands of rural homes in Missouri, 
Kansas and surrounding states. 

The Team maintains a full-time Farm Service 
department, under the direction of Phil Evans, 
nationally known expert. Innumerable experi- 
ments and developmental projects conducted on 
the thousand-acre KMBC-KFRM Service Farms, 
are passed on to rural listeners. 

Evans is ably assisted by Ken Parsons, well 
known agronomist. Together, these two experts, 
with their up-to-the minute daily reports, keep 
rural listeners informed on latest developments in 
this important business of farming and agriculture. 



The Team has the largest and finest 
group of artists ever developed by any 
Midwestern radio station. Pictured here 
is Hiram Higsby, master of ceremonies 
and entertainment star, heard on the na- 
tionally famous Brush Creek Follies, 
Dinnerbell and Western Roundup. ..just 
a few of the top-notch entertainment 
programs that are a daily feature of The 
KMBC-KFRM Team. 



BOB RILEY 



Third member of this trio is Bob Riley, full-time 
marketcaster, who spends his entire working day 
at the Stockyards. He presents the market news 
several times each day direct from the Kansas City 
Livestock Exchange. 

Other program features are presented by The 
Team specifically for the farm andience. As a 
result, The KMBC-KFRM Team is a welcome 
guest in the homes of those who live in the great 
Kansas City Trade territory. 





The KMBC-KFRM Team Serves 3,659,828* People 



* 1940 Census 



7th Oldest CBS Affiliate 

KMBC 

OF KANSAS CITY 
5000 on 980 




Represented Nationally by 
FREE & PETERS, INC. 



Programmed from Kansas City 

KFR 

For Kansas Farm Coverage 
5000 on 550 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY MIDLAND BROADCASTING COMPANY 




A SALUTE TO 

I950 

and Best Wishes to Everyone in Radio — for the 

most prosperous New Year in Broadcasting history. 

To all networks — all Radio Stations — to the 

N.A. B. — to Advertising Agencies and their 

Clients. Let's All Tell the World 

in 1950 That Radio Is America's 

Greatest Advertising Medium* 

WJR 

THE GOODWILL STATION >nc 



Represented by: 

PETRY 



50,000 

WATTS 



G. A. RICHARDS 

Chairman of the board 



CBS 
DETROIT 



HARRY WISMER 

Ass't to the President 



MICHIGAN'S GREATEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

'It's estimated there will be more than 90,000000 radio sets serving America in 1950 



:H 



ITIUO 
MO. 



A N 

vzvid u3ii3J3x: 

DNllSVOavOUQ TVNOI1VN 
3nOVHdS S33NVHJ 

CI*? 2 I Sfr-CM c'S 



«c,a«flMt mm 





0ef^ Lightning That Talks 

jpfr&W* Sp ec j a | 8-Page Picture Section—page 105 



30 JANUARY 1950 
$8.00 a Year 
50 cents a copy 



HOW TO 

HIT THE BULLSEYE 

IN VIRGINIA 



The marksman who wins the prize is the one who 
hits dead center with every shot. 
The bullseye in Virginia is the area some 75 miles 
around fast-growing Richmond 

And this is the area where Havens & Martin stations, 
radio and television both, are fully appreciated and 
faithfully tuned. These First Stations of Virginia, 
pioneer outlets for NBC, are tailor-made for top 
advertising results throughout Virginia's first market. 
Your nearest Blair representative will tell you 
about WMBG, WTVR, and WCOD, how they tie in 
with your picture. 



Havens & Martin Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institutions in Virginia. 



WMBG 
WTVR 
WCOD 



FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 



Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
Represented nationally by 
John Blair & Company. 




TS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



Birth rate breaks 
record in 1949 



CF still spends 
most for radio 



Radio increased 
Pet Milk sales 131% 



P & C, Bab-0 

get lowest C.P.I. 

from radio 



Women's mags 

second to radio for 

food advertisers 



30 January 1950 

A Metropolitan Life Insurance report released this month showed that 
3,700,000 children were born in 1949 — an unprecedented number in 
the country's history, and the third successive year in which the 
population increase exceeded 3,500,000. Children influence buying 
habits; they acquire buying habits. . .both important to advertisers. 

-SR- 

The largest food advertiser, General Foods, spends more for radio 
than any other medium. More than half of its broadcasting budget is 
in daytime radio. Figures available for 1948 look like this: 



All radio 
Daytime radio 
Newspapers 
General magazines 
Farm magazines 



$6,774,000 
4,204,000 
4,313,000 
4,501,000 
1,280,000 

-SR- 



The canned milk market, exclusive of government sales, increased more 
than 40% in the last decade. Pet Milk sales increased 131%. Most 
of its advertising budget has been allocated to radio. According to 
the most recent report (1948) Pet Milk spent §1,320,000 (time costs 
exclusive of talent) for network radio. §58,000 went to newspapers. 
Breakdowns of inquiry costs for magazines, newspapers and radio are 
virtually in the category of military secrets for most companies. 

-SR- 

Some comparative costs obtained by Bab-0 and P & G illustrate as 
perhaps nothing else can some of radio's advantages in action. 

Bab-0 breakdown of inquiry costs on identical offers for three media: 
1942 cost per inquiry in magazines : 
1942 cost per inquiry in newspapers 
1942 cost per inquiry in radio : 





$1 


.44 










36 










08 






in 


the 
U 


same 
37 
367 
.097 


three 


media 



The P&G breakdown, also on identical offers, 
1933 cost per inquiry in magazines : 
1933 cost per inquiry in newspapers : 
1933 cost per inquiry in radio : 

-SR- 

Food advertisers today invest more than twice as much money in net- 
work radio alone as they do in all women's magazines combined. It is 
impossible to get an accurate estimate of the total figure for all 
radio (including regional and national spot operations). Food adver- 
tisers spent in the neighborhood of §47,000,000 for network time costs 
(exclusive of talent) in 1948. 



SPONSOR, Volume i. No. 8, 30 .lanuai>. 1950 Published biweekly tor SPONSOR Publlcatl i In il 3110 Elm \>.- . Baltimore 11. Mil. 1 illation onw 

510 Madison \\<' New York 22, ?* a year in l\ s. $<i elsewhere, Entered as - rid clasi mattei 20 Januan 1949 el Baltimore Md [office undei \ : March 1879. 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR RE 



Campbell Soup 
radio budget rises 



Campbell Soup — leader in its field — spent 52% of its budget in 
radio in 1938 and 66% in 1948. 



"Big three" increase 
radio budgets 154% 



Tobacco industry 
ups radio spending 



Armstrong Rugs 
use radio 100% 



-SR- 

The "big three" soap advertisers increased their buy of network radio 

time alone from $10,859,018 in 1938 to $27,570,390 in 1948. An 

increase of 154%. 

One of the "big three" — the largest advertiser in America — 

P & G, spent 57% of its 1948 budget for network radio time alone. 

In 1936 it spent 40% of its $8,000,000 advertising budget for network 

radio time. 

-SR- 

The cigarette and tobacco industry, from 1938 to 1948, increased its 
expenditure for network radio time only from about $8,000,000 to 
$21,000,000. 

-SR- 

Armstrong Quaker Rugs — a "visual" item — dropped magazines in 
1938, and proved it could sell colorful rugs through the spoken word. 
100% of its budget is in network radio. It increased from $91,901 
in 1941 to $429,133 in 1948. 

-SR- 



Prudential boosts 

radio $1,385,670 

over decade 



largest insurance advertiser — was a 
Today they are one of America's 100 



Prudential Insurance Co. - 
newcomer to radio in 1939. 
leading advertisers: 

48% of its advertising budget in radio in 1939 

81% of its advertising budget in radio in 1946 

$414,330 for radio in 1939 

$1,770,158 for radio in 1946 

$1,800,000 for radio in 1949 



-SR- 



Benton & Bowles 

survey charts 

media rate trend 



A study by Benton & Bowles shows what is happening to the cost of 
the gross circulation of various media: 

Changes in Media Cost Per M: 1948 vs. 1959 
Medio 

Radio Network Time 

Women's Service Magazines 

General Monthlies 

Sunday Supplements 

Daily Newspapers 

Farm Publications 

Radio announcements 

General Weeklies 

News Weeklies 

Outdoor 



Rates up 


Circ. 


Cost 


per M 


10% 


24% 


11% 


down 


21 


37 


11 


down 


16 


23 


6 


down 


43 


48 


4 


down 


37 


36 


1 


up 


20 


16 


4 


up 


37 


24 


9 


up 


83 


64 


12 


up 


138 


104 


17 


up 


46 


- 


- 






-please 


turn 


to page 54— 

SPONSOR 



NO. 8 OF A SERIES 



UNITED STATES 

In Relay Racing, - 

WHEC 
In Rochester 








WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 
Note WHEC's leadership morning, afternoon, evening: 





STATION STATION STATION 


STATION 


STATION 


STATION 




WHEC B C 


D 


E 


F 


MORNING 

8:00-12:00 Noon 
Monday through Fri. 


43.0 15.8 10.1 


4.8 


20.2 


4.4 


AFTERNOON 

12:00-6:00 P.M. 

Monday through Fri. 


34.4 25.6 9.2 


14.4 


9.2 


3.5 

Station 


EVENING 


37.5 25.5 6.7 


9.1 


11.8 


Broadcast! 
till Sunset 


6:00-10:30 P.M. 

Sunday through Sat. 


OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 

Latett before c'oiin 


HOOPER, 


1949 


Only 











BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 




N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc., Now York, Chicago, HOMER GRIFFITH CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



30 JANUARY 1950 




RECEIVED 
FEB 2 1S50 

Vol, 4 no. 3 NBC G 30 January 1950 




FEATURES 



Sponsor Reports 

510 Madison Ave. 

Behind the Cutnera 

\ew and Renew 

Wr. .Sponsor: 

Victor >I. Rutner 

i*.S. 

Editorial 

Wr. Sponsor Asks 

Sponsor Speaks 

Applause 



I 

ti 

it 

15 

20 
24 
35 
56 
I2H 
128 



Editor & President: Norrnan R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Franl M. Bannister, Ellen Davi*. 
Irving Marder 

Assistant Editors: Joe Gould, Fred Birnbaurn 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President - advertising: Norman Kniqht 

Advertising Director: Lester J. Blumenthal 

Advertising Department: Jerry Glynn, Jr. 

(Chicago Manager), Edwin D. Coope' 

Coast Manager), M. L. LeBlanq 

Beatrice Turner, William Ethe, Edna Yergin 

Vice-President & Bjsiness Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Circulation Department: Ann Ostrow, Emilv 
Cutillo. Victoria Woods 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Publl hed blwt'ckl) l>\ SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS. 
INC. Executive, Ivilimui. mi. I Advertising Offlo 10 

Vork 22, N V Telephone: Murraj 
Hill H 2772 Chicago Office 380 N Michigan Avenue 
Telephone n Printing Office: 3110 Klin 

Av< . lUlllmore 1 1 Md Bub i rlptlon i nlted 
J* > year Cli 

Printed In U. H. A. Add to S10 

Sew V.ik 22 N V Copyrlghl 1950 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS. INC 



ARTICLES 



Radio breaks its silenee 

This month LIGHTNING THAT TALKS makes its debut throughout the country 37 

Faets that talk 

Items culled from the volumes of research that went into production of the 
All-Radio film presentation 4© 



Premieres don't votne often 

How subscribers can arrange a successful and effective local showing 



They had to use radio 

A carload of over-ripe peaches is a rotten liability. Here's how Me Too trans- 
formed it into an appetizing asset 



Davison's couldn't sell diamonds 

When Davison's tried radio, selling diamonds was no longer a problem. Results 
came within a one-month test period. 



IN FUTURE ISSUES 

Radio helps "small business" 

What part radio played in the Taylor-Reed Corporation's 1949 $2,000,000 
gross. The story of a "ten-year wonder" 



42 



44 



Hi 



The oig drive 

From fourth place to first ... a San Francisco milk firm leads its competitors MSt 

after using radio for one year 

Radio opens doors 

Radio has made the Prudential agent a welcome visitor in the American home •*• 

it-pane picture section 

Photographs of the people who produced the All-Radio film, of the sets, and io~ 

of some of the actors 



I eb. 13 



After midnight audience 

A SPONSOR analysis of the commercial possibilities of reaching the midnight- 
owl millions. Facts and figures on vast potential market f"<*0. f •» 

\eticork or Spot? 

An analysis of the comparative virtues of the selling power for specific prod- 

ucts of spot and network radio weO. I •> 

I he waiting farm markt't 

Farm income and demand for electrical appliances hit an all-time high, but 
radio is generally missing the boat 




why buy 2 or more... 

do one big job on "Radio Baltimore" 



♦ WBAL covers the rich Baltimore area, Maryland, 
and sizable chunks of Virginia, Delaware and 
Pennsylvania — an area with over 4,225,000 
people who spend more than $3,290,000,000 
annually in retail sales. 

Represented nationally by Edward Petry Co., Inc. 



WBAL 

50,000 Watts 
NBC Affiliate 




KITITV 



A picture from Helsinki or 
Halifax reaches KMTV within 
the hour it hreaks, via Acme 
Telephoto's National and In- 
ternational system. 

ONLY TWO TELEVISION 
STATIONS IN THE UNITED 
STATES HAVE COMPLETE 
ACME TELEPHOTO SERV- 
ICE. Therefore, the KMTV 
News is FIRST (ahead of all 
media in Omaha). 

Make your advertising "First" 
in Omaha! Use the KMTV 
News ! 



KITITV 

TELEVISION CENTER 

Omaha 2, Nebraska 

• • • 

Represented By 
Avery Knodcl, Inc. 




510 Madison 



THE ALL-RADIO FILM 

LIGHTNING THAT TALKS is go- 
ing to tell a story that has needed tell- 
ing for many years. It will present in 
compact fashion radio's part in mov- 
ing merchandise and thus contributing 
to a bigger, better America. The larg- 
er the number of people that sees 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS, the wid- 
er will be the understanding of this 
medium's force in our way of living. 
The film has been produced under di- 
rection of a corporation staffed bv 
broadcasters, by men who understand 
the subject because they are part of it. 
The product of their efforts will attest 
to their devotion to the duty of pro- 
ducing LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. I 
hope every business man in the coun- 
try will see this, and I urge broad- 
casters to work diligently in bringing 
it to their attention. 

Justin Miller 

President 

NAB 

Washington, D. C. 



No day passes without innumerable 
instances of radio's unique power to 
command attention and to stimulate 
action. Many are reported in the press, 
many remain unreported; but each of 
these occurrences has a lasting influ- 
ence on those who experience it. 

LIGHTNING THAT TALKS, the 
All-Radio promotion film, is especialh 
significant for its manner of demon- 
strating that the medium's power lies in 
its penetration and persuasiveness. No- 
where in the film is there a shot of a 
studio or a microphone. It is a study 
of where radio goes rather than where 
radio originates. Its method is docu- 
mentary and its mood is entertaining. 
It defines all of the major relations 
and processes by which a radio pro- 
gram is caused to serve the mutual in- 
terests of the listener, the advertiser, 
and the broadcaster. Appropriately, 
.iikI iiic\ ilabh . tin' film draws its illns- 
trations from real life, introducing 
sponsor, broadcaster, sales executive, 
listener-consumer, arid distributor of 
the sponsor's product. 

LIGHTNING THAT TALKS is a 
film that sa\ s: 

"This i- how radio helps people, and 
this is how e\ri\bod\. the listener, the 
broadcaster and the advertiser, uses 



for profitable 

set ling - 

I NVE STIG ATE 



WGAL 

WGAL-TV 

\ LANCASTER i 
L PENNA. 



WKBO 

k HARRISBURG 
PENNA. 



WORK 



YORK 
PENNA. 



WRAW 

. READING • 
PENNA. 



WEST 

k EASTON / 
PENNA. 



WDEL 

WDEL-TV 

■ WILMINGTON ' 
\ DEL. 




Clair /.'. McCollough, '• Manager 

ft epr e sen led by 

§111 ROBERT MEEKER 

ASSOCIATES 

Los Angeles New York 

Son Ffoncisco Chicoqo 



STEINMAN STATIONS 



SPONSOR 



radio to help themselves and each 
other." 

Because it does all of this, and does 
it so well, I believe this unprecedented 
All-Radio film can look forward to a 
fruitful career of showing how to make 
more effective use of that indispensa- 
ble force — radio. 

Frank Stanton 

President 

Columbia Broadcasting System 



We are glad to learn that you are de- 
voting an entire issue to the organized 
promotional drive for radio broadcast- 
ing as an advertising medium. 

The radio drive should prove impor- 
tant and helpful in the current need for 
increased advertising effort. 

Advertising has the major responsi- 
bility in finding the customers for 
America's vast output of goods and 
services . Business will come to see this 
increasinglv. we think, as each medium 
tells the story of advertising in its ap- 
propriate way. 

It is good that radio is now solidly 
behind such an effort. We are glad to 
know you are helping to give it vigor- 
ous promotion to put the story across. 
Frederic R. Gamble 
President 
AAAA 
New York City 



Radio has progressed so rapidly dur- 
ing the comparatively brief span of its 
existence that it has had no opportu- 
nity, no time to sit back and appraise 
its overall position in the economic 
scheme of things. 

The All-Radio Presentation will cor- 
rect this situation, for it portrays in 
dramatic manner how radio affects the 
daily lives of all the people in our 
country — how it influences their think- 
ing, and how it shapes buying habits. 

I also believe that a very important 
aspect of this undertaking is the fad 
that it represents a joint effort of the 
whole radio industry — networks, net- 
work affiliates, independent stations 
and station representatives — all work- 
ing together for the good of their in- 
dustry. Those who participated for all 
these elements are to be congratulated 
on their accomplishment. 

ABC for its part gladly underwrote 
its share of the cost and was happy to 
contribute the services of our people 

{Please turn to page 10) 




is for irotnvn. • 



Bless 'em! They do 87 r c of the buying, 'tis said. 
That's where we take our cue for morning and after- 
noon programming. High rated NBC soap operas, 
quiz, and local "personalized" programs. They love it! 




"5K ° 


o 


fm 








l 



is for men . 



The breadwinners for 499,379 Mid-South families 
who stay tuned to VVMC — Give 'em their pipe and 
slippers, set the radio dial at 790 for news, NBC 
Network shows, and local sports. We keep 'cm happy! 




is for children • • • 

They get up in the morning and go to bed at night 
humming your singing jingle. They help you "drive 
it home." Put it on the station the family prefers. In 
the $2,400,000,000 Memphis market, that's WMC! 



WMC 



I 



NBC* 5000 Watts»790 



50 KW Simultaneously Duplicating AM Schedule 
First TV Station in Memphis and the Mid-South 

National Representatives • The Branham Company 
Owned and Operated by The Commercial Appeal 



30 JANUARY 1950 




Behind 

the Camera 

Ben Cradus. producer of LIGHT- 
NING THAT TALKS, was looking 
around to cast a pair of hands that 
would ha\e the pudginess of Ben 
Franklin's. After long investigation, 
he used his own. 

One of Gradus's hobbies is graphol- 
ogy. He found it easy therefore to 
forge Franklins signature. The writing 
of the signature had to he done with 
white India ink on black cardboard — 
but the quill scratched. Therefore, 
hidden inside the quill was a pen point. 

In writing the film. Gradus went to 
Philadelphia and tried to find a replica 
ol Franklin's ke\ and kite. After much 
investigation in the Franklin Institute 
and the Boor Richard Club. etc.. he 
found that "There is no proof that 
Benjamin Franklin ever did a light- 
ning experiment." 

Going back to the original letters of 
Franklin, he found thai he had written: 
"...an experiment has been performed 
in Philadelphia w hereb) . . ." 

It would seem thai there were I or 5 
cronies oi Franklin's who worked on 
these electrical experiments and usu- 
all) he wrote the initials of the men 

who had done the experiments in his 

a< i ounts of the expei iments. h was 
impossible to find the actual orig inal 
account of the kiic experiment. 

Il <ml\ remains that Franklin u i <>lr 
to his friend, Collinson, in England 

who «;i- In- pre-- agenl 90 to speak. 



Collinson just took it for granted that 
Franklin had done the experiment and 
publicized it that wa\ . 

This made all the more interesting 
Gradus" visit to Franklin's grave where 
engraved in bronze is: "He wrested 
From the Skies the Lightning, and 
From the Tyrant, the Sceptre." 

Furlher investigation only showed 
that even Carl Van Doren. Franklins 
biographer, could only at best say: 
"... If anybody did it. it probably was 
Franklin. . . ." 

And the only other man who tried 
it — a Russian — was killed by the elec- 
tric charge. 



Joe Brun. cameraman, was complete- 
ly bewildered in Columbus. Georgia. 
Though he was born and raised in 
France, he is now a citizen of the U.S. 
and speaks English well. But. in most 
cases, he needed an interpreter of the 
southern drawl. Columbus. Ga.. is al- 
most as deep South as one can get. 
At one point, he turned towards the 
director and whispered into his ear: 
"There is something wrong with the 
dialogue — it isn't good English to say: 
"Tell you what lets do ..." Gradus 
assured him that this was an accepted 
< olloquialism. 

There was some slight trouble with 
a romantic scene of the boy proposing 
to the girl. The scene ends in a roman- 
tic kiss and. naturally, the director was 
not satisfied with the way it was done. 
Though he weighs 200 pounds himself. 
Gradus took another look at the 6' 3" 
bulk of a boy and decided that the 
directing had to be done without the 
help of demonstration. 

Between the time that the script was 
written and the crew came down to 
shoot the documentary scenes, nature 
had taken its toll: One important actor 
was spraying his throat because of a 
bronchial condition all through the 
da) - shooting; one woman was just 
getting over a nervous breakdown and 
through the setting up of the scene in- 
dulged in a few nips of "medicine for 

her COUgh. By the time the shooting 
( onmicnced. she was barely able to say 
her lines. However. Gradus used a 
glass) stare for a \ei\ successful comic 

1 ffeel although be bad to lake her by 
the shoulders epiite often and shake her 

violently to gel her to listen to whal be 
was saying. I hej parted good Friends. 

One man who showed up for a scene 
one « I ;i x did not show up for his fol- 



lowing scene the next: his brother-in- 
law died. The script had to be rewrit- 
ten in a hurry. 

Another man had one line to say and 
they worked on that one line from 4:00 
p.m. to 3:00 a.m. 

Another man refused to cooperate — 
even though he was a key figure in a 
particular scene. Everyone — the sta- 
tion manager, store representatives, 
etc., ganged up on him to get him to 
help, but he still refused. Perhaps the 
personal approach would work, Gradus 
thought, and made a private appoint- 
ment with the man. It evolved that, 
when excited, the man stuttered and 
was afraid that he would do so in front 
of the camera. The script was rewrit- 
ten so that he had only a few short 
sentences to say. 



When the sound track came back 
from Ga., Walter Sachs, the production 
man on the film came running into 
Gradus's office: "What happened? ... 
You must have been running the re- 
corder at a slow T speed. . . ." There 
had been no error. This was the re- 
cording of the department store man- 
ager who speaks in a very slow south- 
ern drawl and has a deep bass voice — 
sounding as though a record is turning 
very slowry. 



In the sequence of "Listening Around 
the Clock." the script calls for a man 
listening to a radio while relaxing in 
I he park. Afraid that he could not get 
the scene in New \ ork — where w inter 
was closing in. Gradus shot this in San 
Francisco's Union Square. To give the 
scene movement and interest, he had a 
year and one-half old boy wade 
through a big flock of pidgeons — sup- 
posedly to his father. Gradus used his 
own son for this scene — but needed a 
man to act as the father. As is usual, a 
crowd had gathered round to watch. 

Seeing likeh man. Gradus asked il 

he would pla\ I he part. The man was 
willing and the scene was successfully 
shot — using five pounds of bird seed 
to gather up the pidgeons and a box of 
chocolates to get his son to walk in the 
correct direction. When signing the 
release — the paper which gives author- 
its to the film maker to use his like- 
ness the man said: "Maybe you've 
heard of me. \I\ name is 'Shipwreck' 

Kell\." Kell\. once the husband of the 
socialite- Brenda Fra/.ier. was com- 
pelled to lake- his one dollar bill to 

make the signing legal. 

* * • 



3 



SPONSOR 




I 

I 




■ 

■ 
■ 









* 'iy 



WORCESTER 

A Test Market. 
Tested and Opportune 



Worcester and Central New England offer an 

effective test market, completely covered by 
both WTAG and WTAG-FM. 



Each one influences Test Market selections! 



h 



'• 3rd largest New England City 



17th ranking industrial area in the 
nation 



• Over 1 00,000 different products 



• Value of products $330,935,000 

annuaUy 



• 67th county in nation in farm 
income $19,761,900 



26th county in population in the 
nation — 552,900° 



35th county in total income — 
E.B.I. $661,409,000* 



Average industrial wage (1st 11 
months 1948) Worcester $57.10 
(nation $52.83) 



Average food sales per Worcester 
family annually — $1,220 
(52.2% above nation) 



82 new industries in Worcester 
since V-J Day 



■ 
Construction activity 1948 (10 
months) 41% over 1947 



• Bank debits 1948 (9 months) 
12.7% over '47 (N.E. 7.9%) 



* 147,800 families in a compact 
trading area with 54 cities and 
towns 



* Served by three major railroads 
and over 50 major trucking 
companies 






TAG 



WORCESTER 

580 KC 5000 Watts 



PAUL H. RAYMER CO. Notional Sales Representatives. 
Affiliated with the Worcester Telegram - Gazette 



\SIC 




• 1500 retail grocery outlets 



205 retail drug outlets 



• Not dominated by chain stores 



vey of Buying Power; further repro- 
duction not licensed. 




Again and again, for the fourth consecutive 
time . . . every year since joining the ABC 
network . . . VVCAE has been selected by ad- 
vertising directors and account executives as 
one of three ABC stations in cities of over 
half a million population for outstanding 
audience promotion. This promotion and 
VVCAE's merchandising services will help 
sell your products or services. For details, 
consult the Katz Agency . . . then you'll agree 
that 

IN PITTSBURGH 




/s "tfe stat/ott ~6/rd~t SFllSf 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES— THE KATZ AGENCY 



510 Madison 



who worked on various committees. 
Robert E. Kintner 
President 
American Broadcasting Company 



Because I assisted in the preparation 
and presentation of the Retail Promo- 
tion Plan. AIR FORCE AND THE RE- 
TAILER. I feel that I can comment 
somewhat objectively on the All-Radio 
Presentation, LIGHTNING THAT 
TALKS. In my humble estimation, the 
All-Radio Presentation is the most 
complete and convincing sales story of 
broadcasting and broadcast advertising 
that has ever been compiled and re- 
leased . 

Perhaps this would be a good place 
to include a word of warning. LIGHT- 
NING THAT TALKS is entertaining, 
but the entertainment is purely inciden- 
tal to the hard-hitting and straight-for- 
ward sales story this 45-minute talk- 
ing motion picture tells. Don't go to 
vour showing expecting to be enter- 
tained by the great names of network 
and the popular personalities of local 
radio. They are there, of course, in 
sound only, but the sales story of ra- 
dio is there in sight and sound. 

As Chairman of the Committee on 
distribution, I want to voice special 
thanks to C. E. Arney Jr., NAB Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, who largely planned 
the distribution of the Retail Promo- 
tion plan and whose notes and files 
were made completely available to me 
in planning the distribution of the All- 
Radio Presentation. Special thanks 
are also due Gordon Gray of WIP, the 
patient and painstaking Chairman, and 
Victor Ratner of Macy's (then of 
CBS) a brilliant and inexhaustible cre- 
ator of LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 
for their comments, criticisms and sug- 
gestions in connection with the distri- 
bution plan. 

Actually. I feel very privileged to 
serve as a member on the All-Radio 
Presentation Committee Inc. The in- 
dividual members, with the exception 
of the author, represented every phase 
of broadcasting. They represented in- 
dividual attainments that were prob- 
ably unmatched in any other industry- 
wide committee. The give and take of 
their discussions and their quick un- 
derstanding of others' points of view 

{Please turn to page 28) 



10 



SPONSOR 




30 JANUARY 1950 



11 




•BIG- 
***** 

SHOW! 












"'■^m 



pftoGR^ s 






CON***"* 

ON Wi« 

progrM* 1 - 



'"W**.! 



BEM 




Radio's Most 
Entertaining 
Quarter-Hour 
Show . . . AT A 

SURPRISINGLY 

LOW PRICE! 








TM 10R» 10JWJ, 



MENT STORt- 
DRUG 'AINS 
GROCER . MAINS 
STATIONS 

(for participate 

.AND MANY MORE! 



IRST TO GET THE STORY OF 
f, SMASH-HIT^-HOUR SHOW! 



IT'S THE SENSATIONALLY SUCCESS- 
FUL ANSWER TO YOUR DEMAND 
FOR A HARDER-SELLING PROGRAM! 

Here's today's most refreshing, most informal, 
lost informative show! Here's today's new 
istening habit — "Meet The Menjous." It's 
'aying off for sponsors with bigger audiences, 
aster sales, greater profits at lower cost! That 
he public prefers the new and exciting "Meet 
."he Menjous" technique is evidenced by the 
nstant and sensational success of this power- 
>acked program wherever it is running! 

"here's magic in the MENJOU name — sales 
lagic that enables your sponsors to capitahze 
>n their tame. The readily-recognized Menjou 
ices -publicized by powerful promotion on 
undreds of great Hollywood movies —lend 
hemselves perfectly to hard-selling, localized 
ampaigns that are hitting the jackpot for 
esult-minded sponsors! 



"MENJOU" NAME IS OPEN SESAME TO 
BIGGER AUDIENCES AT LOWER COST! 

The combination of the increasingly popular 
"Meet The Menjous" programming technique, 
plus the terrific nation-wide acceptance for the 
big. box-office "Menjou" name accounts for 
the instant success of this sensational program! 
Listeners are impressed with the glamour and 
magic of Adolphe Menjou and Verree Teasdale 
Menjou — regard them as America's most 
happily married Hollywood couple— con- 
sistently tunc in to them because they repre- 
sent coda) 's most v ital and charming sounding 
board of American folk, fact, and fane) 




ey talk about movie greats 
and music — fashions and food 
— teen-agers and travel — prob- 
lem parents and pels — a host 
of headline topics! 



j 

r s 'Oni- 



N- 



Ht RALD 



f R\BUNE 



Converse 



tion 



has 



giv 



en 



a s 



hot 



o* u 



\e*P' 



been 
>cted 



idrena 



\in\ 




THE FIRST 3 MINUTES 

ARE 0*t the U&uAe. 




ASK HER ABOUT KITE 



Isn't that the real proof? 



If you could +a Ik to all the housewives in 
San Antonio, they'd tell you an amazing story 
about KITE, the big 1000 watt independent 
that's built an enthusiasm among the local 
ladies that rivals the spirit of the Alamo 
defenders. 

It's a story that began two years ago, a 
story that has made Hooper wonder "how 
come", a story built on strict block-program- 
ming, careful attention to copy, and a down- 
to-earth human touch: no blood, no thunder, 
no screams, no moans. >. 

It's a story of a radio-man's radio station, 
for there are more than 50 years of Texas radio 
experience among the key personnel who own 
and operate KITE without network options or 
outside stockholders. 



"the utijj&l fjcut&ute ttatiosi 



rr 



Represented by 

INDEPENDENT 

METROPOLITAN 

SALES 

New York • Chicago 



It's a story of strong listener loyalty that 
pays off at the cash register for KITE adver- 
tisers. 

It's a story that often offers you Hooperat- 
ings as good or better than the chained 
stations, and always offers you more listeners 
per dollar. 

It's a story you can get first-hand, right 
now — and for free — by picking up your tele- 
phone. 




1000 WATTS 




930 on ANY dial 



SAN ANTONIO 



14 



SPONSOR 



Y#»#r and r 



30 January 1950 




These reports appear in alternate issues 



New National Spot Business 



SPONSOR 

Bell * Co. 

Carter* Product* Inc 

Chrysler Corp 

Colgate-Pal molive-Peet 

Emerson Drug Co 
Fitch Co 

Griffin Mfg. Co 

Koppers Co 
Lehon Co 

Plllsbury Mill. 

R. J. Reynolds 

Ryan Candy Co 

Weston Biscuit Co 
Willys Overland 
William Wrigley Co 



PRODUCT 

Bel-Ans 

Liver pills 

Dodge 
Lustre-Crcme 

Urn in.. -S, I I i , r 

Fitch shampoo 

Allwhite shoe polish 

Fence poult 
Roofing 

Globe Mills dlT 

Tobacco 

Hopalong candy bar 

Baked goods 
Willys 
Chewing gam 



AGENCY 

Redfield- Johnstone 
(N. Y.) 

Ted Bates & Co 
(N. Y.) 

Ruthrauff & Ryan 

<N. Y.) 
Lennen & Mitchell 

(N. Y.) 
BBD&O <N. Y.) 
Harry B. Cohen 

(N. Y.) 

II. rinin ii.un. < .lMlrnisn 

& Pierce <N. Y.) 
iiiiumi (N. Y.) 
Schwlmmer A Scott 

(Chicago) 
Leo Burnett Co 

(L. A.) 
William Esty c\ Y.) 

Blaker (N. Y.) 



Harrington, Whitney 
Hurst (L. A.) 

Ewell & Thurber 
(Toledo, Ohio) 

Arthur Meyerhoff 
(Chi.) 



STATIONS-MARKETS 

9 stns; 9 cities; Midwest, 
II ih.. Phlla., Schenec- 
tady, IN.Y.C. 

7 stns* ; Alaska Broadcast- 
ing System 

80O cities 

Renewals; N. Y. & Chi. 

25 cities 
I" mkts 

12 stns*; Florida 

Ark., Miss., Ala., S. C. 
12 midwest markets 

12 stns; CBS; Pac net 

4 stns* ; Alaska 

New England, N. Y., Piltsb., 
Washington, D. C. 

9 stns; L. A., S. F., San 

Diego 
30 mkts 

WNAC, Boston 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 

Spots; January; 26 wks for .to 
starting in January 

Spots for 1950 



Spots 

Spots; 5 top mkts for 52 wks; S-l 

new mkts in March; 26 wks 
Spots; January 1; 52 wks 
Spots; mid-January 

Spots; Dec 18; 15 wks 

One-min partic on farm programs 
I r»-in In shows; February; 26 wka 

"It's Fun To Be Young"; Jan. 7; 

52 wlu 
Spots for 1950 

Spots; sometime in February 



Spots; Jan 16; 2 wks 

Spots; January 

Spots and program campaign; Jan; 
13 wks 



Station Representation Changes 



STATION 

CKOK, Penticton, B.C. 
KFDA, Amarillo, Texas 
WAIR, Winston Salem, N. C. 
WDUK, Durham, N. C. 
WNAO, Raleigh, N. C. 
WNEX, Macon, Georgia 
WPTR, Albany, N. Y. 
WRFD, Worthlngton, Ohio 
WROL, Know ill.-, Tennessee 
WSAT, Salisbury, N. C. 



AFFILIATION 

Independent 

ABC 

ABC 

ABC 

ABC 

MBS 

Independent 

Independent 

NBC 

Independent 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

Radio Representatives Ltd 

Branham Co, N Y. 

Walker Co, N. Y. 

Weed & Co, N. Y. 

Weed & Co, N. Y. 

Branham Co, N. Y. 

Ra-Tel Representatives Inc., N. Y. 

Taylor-BorroO' & Co, N. Y. 

Avery-Knodel Inc, N. Y. 

Piedmont, Salisbury, N. C. 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 

Edward C. Ball 
John H. Baxter 
William E. Becker 
Robert Black 
Joseph I Boland Jr 
Robert E. Bousquet 
Benjamin C. Bowker 
J. W. Bradfute 
Ernie Byfield Jr 
Frank FI. Cankar 
Richard M. Clement 
Lawrence D*Aloise 
Dorothy Day 
H. Kendig Eaton 
George R. Eckels 
Fred P. Fielding 
Catherine Finerty 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

Mathisson & Associates. Milwaukee, acct exec 

Robert W. Orr, N. Y., vp 

Chris Lykkes & Assoc, S.F., acct exec 

Weinberg. L.A., pub rel dir 

Briggs & Varley Inc, N.Y., acct exec 

Lever Bros., N. Y., asst adv mgr in charge of Lux 

Willys-Overland Motors, Toledo, dir pub rel 

W. Earl Bothwell Inc. Pittsb. 

NBC-TV, N. Y., dir of sustaining shows 

International Rigester Co, Chi., prod-sls-adv mgr 

Veterans Administration, Phila., chief of pub rel 

J. Walter Thompson Co, IN. Y. 

McCann-Erickson 



Head of his own Dallas agency 



Anderson, Davis & Platte Inc, N.Y., copy and 
merchandising 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, associate 

Same, dir and exec vp 

William E. Cayman & Assoc, S.F., acct exec 

Dan B. Miner, L.A., asst radio and tv dir 

Sune> dir, vp and gen mgr 

Chambers & Wiswell Inc, Boston, exec vp 

Buwker & Co, Toledo, pres of new adv and publ rel agency 

Same, N.Y., dir research and marketing 

Weiss & Geller Inc, N.Y., dir of tv 

Fletcher D. Richards Inc, N.Y., acct exec 

John LaCerda, Phila. 

Doherty, Clifford & Sheffield Inc, N.Y., copy supervisor 

Schoenfcld, Huber & Green, Chi., copy chief 

Mathisson & Associates, Milwaukee, pub rel dir 

McLain-Dorville Inc, Phila., acct ©xee 

McLain-Dorville Inc, N.Y., vp 

Same, vp and member of plans board 



In next issue: New and Renewed on Networks, Sponsor Personnel Changes, 

National Broadcast Sales Executive Changes, New Agency Appointments 



\t>u and Renewed. 30 January 1950 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes (Continued) 



NAME 

Mrs. Norine Freeman 
William J. Frosi 
George Thomas (Hark Fry 
W. Richard Guersey 

Jerome It, Harrison 
W'illard Heggen 
Helen Hightower 
Augustine Hilton 
John II. Jameson 
In Jasper 
Steve Josephs 
Bob K Irschbaum 

kirliv Katl 

Lester Krugman 
!..!. Labert 
George It. Lamont 
Van S. Lindsley Jr 
Dick Long 

Edward It. McNeilly 
Mvron A. Mahler 
Monroe Mendelsohn 
A. W. Moore 
Rino C, Negri 

Alfred It. Pastel 
Dr. Philip Reiehert 

Robert M. Renschle 

Ki.lK.nl V. Riehman 
John P. Itohrv 

Arthur Sehwarti 
William R. Seth 

Thomas C. Slat.r 

Rryee Sprnill 
Hal A. Stebbins 

Walter N. Stuckslafrer 
INI -i n Sullivan 
Seth D. Tobias 
William Wilbur 
Lawrence Wiser 
Robert J. Wolterlng 
Francis J. Woods 
F. Howard York 3rd 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

W. B. Doner & Co., Chi., radio dir 

ken von and Fckhardt Ltd, Toronto, office head 

1BC, VY., nail dir of net radio sis 

Itorden Co. N.Y., asst adv mgr of special prods 

dix 
C. D. Reach Co. N.Y., vp 
Co nipt on, N.Y., acct exec 
C ii in p hell-San ford, Chi. 

Newell-Emmett, N.Y. 

MeCann-Erickson Inc. Chi., vp in charge of copv 

Weiss & Geller, N.Y. 

J. Walter Thompson Co, N.Y., acct exec 



Hutching, 
Decca Re 



I'Kil.i exec 
-ords, N.Y.. dir 



A| Paul Lefton Co. N.Y., acct exec 

J. L, Hudson Co, N.Y., assts adv mpr and copy 
chief 

KCRO, Kakersfield, Calif., copy chief 

Emil Mogul Co, N. Y'., copy dir 

Kaufman & Associates, Chi., acct exec 

Agency Associates, L.A., acct exec 

Emil Mogul Co. N.Y P ., in charge of foreign lan- 
guage advertising 

Esquire Inc, Chi., vp and adv dir 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield Inc, N.Y., dir of 
professional div 

Headley-Reed Co, N.Y. 

Columbia Pictures 

Belknap & Thompson Inc. Chi., prorn dir 

Casper Pinsker Inc, N.Y'., copy chief 

Muzak Corp, N.Y'., adv and prom dir 

K hi Ii r .1 nil & Ryan, N. Y., charge of network rela- 
tions, program and talent development 

Burton Browne, Chi. 

Honig-Cooper Co, L.A., exec vp 

Esquire Inc. Chi. western adv mpr 

Robert W. Orr, N.Y.. vp 

Emil Mopul Co, N.Y., asst to pres 

Wilbur-Sheffield, N.Y., exec member 

Federal, N.Y. 

Von Hoffman Press, St. L., copy writer 

Buriiet-Kuhn, Chi., exec vp 

Doremus & Co, Phila., in charge of office 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, dir of radio and t\ planning 
Same, vp 

Kenvon & Fckhardt. N.Y., exec 
Mac.Manus, John *X Adams Inc. Baltti 

flock Co, N. Y., exec 



.d% staff 



Ward Whc 

Same, vp 

Demunn X McGuiness Inc, Chi., acct exec 

Lynn Baker Inc, N.Y'., media dir 

Tat ham-Laird. Chi., copy chief 

II it I •• i Hope A Sons, N.Y., acct exec 

Modern Merchandising Bureau. N.Y., acct exec 

Casper Pinsker, N.Y.. radio dir 

Ward Wheeloek Co, Phila., copy exec 

Grey, N.Y., acct exec 

Casper Pinsker. N.Y., radio dir 

Young & Rubicam Ltd, Toronto, supervisor of media 

Kircher, Helton & Col!ett, Dayton, asst to pres 

Ziniincr-keller Inc, Detroit, asst acct exec 

Rockett-Lauritzen, L.A., tv and radio dir 

Same, vp of creative depts 

Same, radio and tv dir 

Dozier-Craham-Eastman, L.A., acct exec 

Same, vp and head of the foreign language division 

Alfred J. Silberstein-Bert Goldsmith Inc, N.Y., vp 
Same, vp in charge of medical advertising 

MeCann-Erickson Inc, N.Y., mpr radio, t* time buying 
Lew Kashuk & Son, N.Y*., acct exec 
John E. Pearson Co, Chi., acct exec 
Getsrhal & Richard Inc, N.Y., copy dir 
O'Brien & Dorrance Inc, N.Y., radio anil t\ dir 
Same, vp 

Botsf ord, Constant ine & Gardner, Portland. Ore., acct exec 

Set up new agency, Hal Stebbins Inc, L.A. 

Henri. Hurst A McDonald, Chi., exec 

Same, dir and asst to pres 

Same, vp and chairman of plans board 

Edwin Parkin, N.Y., exec vp 

Storm & Klein, N.Y., exec 

Krupnick »K Associates, St. L., acct sve dept 

Same, pres 

Same. N.Y.. vp 



New and Renewed Television (Network and Spot) 



SPONSOR 

American Chicklr Co 
American Tobacco Co 



AGENCY 

K.i.l--. r Browning A 

Hersey 
N. W. Ayer 



Anheuser-Busch * n 






D'Arey 


(Beer) 








Borden Co 






Young A Rubici 


(Coffee) 








Bulova w ..i.i. Co 






Blow 


Chevrolet Dealers 






Campbell.Ewald 


I '.. i ..i>ii..n. Co 






^ oung a it ..i.i. ,, 


1- merson Dtuk Co 






BBD&O 


Forstner Chain Corp 






A. W. Lewin 


Gen Foods Corp 






^ oung .1 Ic.il.i. .. 


( Blrdseye Frosted 


1 . 


...1.) 




i ......l, . ;t r Tire A Ri» 


I.I 


» r 


• lompton 


i ., 








Groller Society 






Mtmaii 


Harriet Hubbard Ay 


i 




Federal 


Henry Heide Co 






Kelly.Nason 


Hill. Bros Co 






Blow 


Horn « Hardarl 






< lements 


Mocller Mfg Co 






1 riimrr-K rassell 


Petri Win.,. 






Young A Rubici 


Powi rhouse < and) 






Bruck 


Procter ••>: Gambit 






1 lancer, 1 ii /r. ra 


(Oxydol) 






Sample 


Ronton \.i Metal « 


.,1 


u 


i . , . . 


s -.i -.1 >.r-.i Vlrh) Spring 


Co 


Barlow 


Simmons Co 






^ oung *\ Rublca 


hi. i ., 






M.-t :,,,,, -1 rlckton 



NET OR STATIONS 

WNBT, N. Y. 



I * Em elope Co 



WNBT. 


N. Y. 


v. RGB, 


Schen, 


WMiy, 


Chi. 


KMIII. 


Hollywood 


WPTZ, 


Phila. 


WCBS, 


N. Y. 


KMIK. 


Hollywood 


KNIIK. 


Hollywood 


WNBT, 


N. Y. 


WABIi, 


N. Y. 


Will. II. 


Schen. 


V. Mil. 


N. Y. 


V. MtV. 


Wash 


\V Mitt 


Wash. 


WPTZ, 


Phila. 


\\ Mill 


N. Y. 


w Aim. 


N. V 


wens. 


N. Y. 


\\ Mil 


IN. Y. 


V. NBQ, 


Chi. 


V. Mil. 


N.Y. 


\\ Mill. 


N. V 


\\ Mil). 


N. V 


V. Mil). 


N x 


V. Mill. 


N. V 


\\ Ml 1 


V V 


n RGB, 


Schen. 


V. Mill. 


< In 


\\( 11- 


V V 


WNBT, 


V >. 


\\ Mil.) 


< hi. 


KMIII. 


Iloll.v, 1 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Film spots; Jan. 3; 1 .'I wks (r) 

Film spots; various -tartinp dates fr 

13 wks (r I 



Dec 13-29; 



Ken Murray Show; Sa (I •' pin; Jan T; 1.1 wks (n) 

Film spots; Jan 1<>; 25 wks (n) 

Film spots; Jan 15; 52 wks (r) 

Film anlienits; Jan 17; 13 wks lr> 

Manhattan Spotlite: Moll 7:30-7:15 pm; Jan 23; 52 

wks (n) 
Film spots; Jan 7: 52 wks <n) 
Film spots: starting dates Jan II. 211; 26 wks (r) 

Film spots: Jan 3; 13 wks (r) 

Film spots; Fell 7: 52 wk- In) 

Film spots; Jan H: I wks In) 

Ilka Chase Show; Ihur 9:30-9l45 pm; Feb In: 52 

wks In) 
Film spots; Jan I; 2H wks (r) 
Film spots: Jan In; 13 wks (rl 
CUldrens Hour: So 10:30-11 l30 am; Jan 29; 52 

wks <r> 
Film spots: Feb 1 : 11 wks In) 
I iln, spots I Jan 17; 13 wks In) 
Captain Video) Mon 7-7:u> pm: Jan 2.1: 13 «k- (n) 

Film -pots; Jan 17; 52 wks In) 

Film spot-; Jan 1: 26 wk- Irl 
Film sp.Us; Jan 9j 52 wk. (n) 

Film spots) Ian ■: 13 wk- lr) 

II mak.-r- Exchange | Thur 4-4 1 30 pin: Jan 

wk- In) 

I iini spots i various inrtini dates from .Ian 
wk. In) 



12: 

3-2 » 



2<i 
H 



Spot Radio Does 
Cost Less Today— 

Startling Comparisons Prove That 
WHO Costs 52% Less Than In 1944! 



Dy every standard that means anything 
whatsoever to forward-looking advertisers, 
advertising on WHO costs less today than 
in 1944. 

Comparing figures from the 1944 and the 
1949 Editions of the Iowa Radio Audience 
Survey,* you find that in 1949 Iowa 
radio homes had increased to the point 
where WHO cost 10.6% less per thousand 
radio HOMES than in 1944! 

Even more startling, you find that in 
1949, multiple-set homes had increased 
to the point where WHO cost 52% less 
per thousand radio home SETS than in 
1944 — and modern research has proved 
that the increased number of home sets 
is even more important than the increase 
in radio homes. (Junior listens to his 
favorite serial program while Dad hears 
the evening news — Mother listens to a 
dramatic program while Sister is tuned 
to popular music — or the whole family 
listens to the same program, but in dif- 
ferent parts of the house. Thus it is no 
longer correct to speak of "radio homes" 
— SETS make today's audiences!) 

By applying the Iowa Surveys' percent- 
ages of one-set radio families and 
multiple-set radio families, against popu- 
lation estimates,** you find that Iowa 
had 769,200 radio homes in 1949, against 



•The 1949 Iowa Radio Audience Survey is the 
twelfth annual study of radio listening habits in 
Iowa. It was made by Dr. F. L. Whan of Wichita 
University — is based on personal interviews with 
over 9,000 Iowa families, scientifically selected 
from cities, towns, villages and farms all over 
the State. 

As a service to the tales, advertising, marketing 
and research professions, WHO will gladly (.end 
a copy of the 1949 Survey to anyone interested in 
the subjects covered. 

"Sales Management's Surveys of Buying Power. 



only 596,000 in 1944. Whereas there were 
only 904,000 sets in Iowa homes five years 
ago, this number had sky-rocketed to 
2,140,000 in 1949! Yet this 136% increase 
in radio sets is for homes alone; it omits 
the hundreds of thousands of sets in 



Iowa cars, offices, barns, stores, trucks. 
restaurants, etc. 

The phenomenal increase in the number 
of Iowa's radio homes and radio sets 
and the decrease in costs — boils down 
to this: 



WHO — CLASS C — V4-HOUR MAXIMUM DISCOUNT. 



Number of Iowa 
Radio Homes 



596,000 
769,200 



Percent Decrease. In 
Cost Per Thousand Cost Per Thousand 
Radio Homes Radio- Homes 

In 1949 



Number of Iowa 
Radio Sets (In Homes) 



904,000 
2,140,000 



Cost Per Thousand 
Radio Sets 
(In Homes) 



Percent Decrease In 
Cost Per Thousand 

Radio Sets 
(In Homes) in 1949 



tThe '/4-hour rate is indicative of all other time segments since W ll()'< cost is 
figured on a ratio basis, ("lass C time is shown because it changed very little 
during the last five years — that is. Class C has remained primarily Daytime . . . 
from 8 to 12 mornings and from I to 6 afternoons. 



Note that all these figures are based only 
on extra sets in Iowa homes. The figures 
do not include hundreds of thousands of 
"non-home" Iowa sets, plus millions of 
sets in WHO's BMB secondary night-time 



•hy 



counties — these are the reasons 
WHO is today a "better buy" than ever. 
For additional facts about WHO's great 
audience-potential, write to WHO or ask 
Free & Petere. 



WHO 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 




FREE & PETERS, INC., 
National Representatives 



30 JANUARY 1950 





the difference is MUTUAL! 





If you think your business is different, 

consider ours for a moment., .and 

discover perhaps how our difference 

can help you with yours. 

You see, we have devoted nearly 

15 years to the business of being a 

different kind of network. 

This gives us quite an edge, in these times 

when extra-efficient, better-than-average 

marketing techniques are required. 

And it gives you several new 

ways -all of them well tested — 

to make your dollars do double duty. 



' 




For instance... 

On no other network can you raise your sales 
voice in 500 transmitter-markets— 300 of them 
being the only network voice in town. On Mutual 
you can . . .The Difference Is MUTUAL! 

On no other network can you enjoy maximum 
flexibility in selecting your station hook-up... 
routing your program as you route your salesmen. 
On Mutual you can . . .The Difference Is MUTUAL! 

On no other network can you locally— at no 
extra cost— tell your customers where to buy what 
you are selling, as well as why. On Mutual 
you can ...The Difference Is MUTUAL! 

On no other network can you buy the proven 
benefits of coast-to-coast radio — and save enough 
to explore the high promise of television too. On 
Mutual you can... The Difference Is MUTUAL! 

On no other network can you s-t-r-e-t-c-h your 
hardworking dollars to the point where you get 
six listener families for the price of five. On 
Mutual you can. ..The Difference Is MUTUAL! 

These are five of the points which add up 
to a big plus for the Mutual advertiser. 
Interested in the proof of any or all of 

the Hilltllll broadcastinq 

them ? Let's sit down together and 




discuss our differences. I %0 II %0 Wm System 



mutual 



A DECADE IN RADIO IS 

EQUAL TO A CENTURY 

OF PROGRESS IN SOME 

MAJOR INDUSTRIES 




DOMINATING MARYLAND'S 
SECOND MARKET 

( Eastern Shore counties — plus Southern 
Delaware) 



WBQC 

AM - - FM 

RADIO PARK, SALISBURY, MD. 



Presidenf 

John W. Downing 



Manager 
Charles J. Truitf 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

BURN-SMITH CO. 

MUTUAL NETWORK 




Mr. Sponsor 



Victor M. Ratner 

Vice-president in charge of advertising 
R. H. Macy & Co., New York 



(Because of Victor Ratner's part in production of LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS, SPONSOR breaks a precedent; never before has any 
one been profiled twice. This is Ratner's second appearance in this 
space within a period of three months. I 

In the early summer of 1947, the networks were searching for a 
trigger-minded, radiowise promotion man to produce a special pres- 
entation for the industry. By summer's end square-shouldered, be- 
spectacled Victor M. Ratner was working on the assignment. Then a 
free lance consultant, he decided to use a motion picture as the 
vehicle for the presentation. 

When Ratner returned to the Columbia Broadcasting System, as 
vice-president in charge of promotion, he continued to guide the 
project. By this time the entire operation had been expanded. The 
National Association of Broadcasters, which was considering similar 
plans, joined forces with the networks for one huge promotion. While 
working on LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. Ratner constantly demon- 
strated his abilities as a top-flight presentation man. To help sell the 
All-Radio presentation idea to potential subscribers, he recorded a 
"radio program" as a sales pitch. 

To provide a basis for the movie, Ratner wrote a prolific, three- 
volume report on radio called "The Sound of America." The report 
was heavilv documented with facts and figures. Although it was not 
possible to use all of the report material in the film, none of its 
high points were left out. 

The theme for the film occurred to Ratner in an interesting way. 
It happened while he was watching a movie in which the characters 
ascend a stairwav to heaven, lie realized that radio is the only 
medium which gets into heaven (broadcast waves are dispersed up- 
wards). This gave him the idea of using Benjamin Franklin (who 
is known as a pioneer student of lightning) as the unofficial narrator 
for the film, franklins hands appear in the film several times and 
on sponsor s cover as well. 

I ndoubtedl) Ratner will take tin- ma-a-e of LIGFMN'ING THAT 
TALKS to heart and do something about it. He's in a position to 
tin -n a- l>. II. \lae\"s vice-president in charge of advertising. 



20 



SPONSOR 



KLZ 

is kh&t in Denver! 



Now ... the No. 1 Hooper Station 



o 



KLZ's Audience Increase... 

(from C. E. Hooper "Share of Audience" Index I 
• Nov. -Dec.) 



Morning 44.7 Increase 

Afternoon 21.3 Increase 

Night 41.9 Increase 

all this in one year's time! 

YOUR BEST BUY IN DENVER... KLZ! 

5,000 Watts — CBS — 560 kc. 

Represented nationally by 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



30 JANUARY 1950 21 



WDG¥ extendi coiigratulation» l 




-- 



11 



SPONSOR 




. . . a "ROOSTER" thai In powerful enough lo be beard every morning from Monday 
through Saturday on WD4«Y throughout the northwest empire. 
"Tllf RED ROO.STEH" In vroicing about winning the National Retail Dry Voodn ANHoelation'a 
retail radio program 4,11 iS I* AWAHD for Schuneman's Department Store in St. Paul. 
WDI»Y Itt proud to be associated with such a popular 

and wales-effective program an "THE RED ROOSTER HOI R." 



Minneapolis • Si. Paul 

.10.000 WATTS 

■(('presented Nationally by Avery-Knodel, Ine. 



30 JANUARY 1950 



23 



New developments on Si*OJ\SOR stories 



p.s. 



5661 "Commercials with a plus" 
ISSU6'. 31 January 1949, p. 28 

Subject! Frequency and impact 



The following excerpt from the research that went into 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS adds to a topic sponsor 
covered a year ago. 

Radio's schedules — which make advertisers weekly ad- 
vertisers (and daily advertisers in the daytime, with pro- 
grams and announcements) — achieved something which 
advertising itself had asked for ever since modern adver- 
tising hegan: repetition, repetition, repetition, consistency, 
consistency, consistency. 

And where magazines and newspapers (because of their 
expense I failed to push advertisers into more "frequency 
of insertion" than once a month, radio came along and 
turned advertisers into good advertisers by creating a 
weekly cycle of insertion within what could be considered 
practical advertising budgets. 

But the weekly cycle of insertions has more meaning 
than one simply of frequency. It gears into the basic 
buying cycle <>f the American family, which is also on a 
weekly basis. A majority of families spend 75' < or more 
of their pay-checks within 24 hours after being paid! 
Most pay-checks are weekly family events. 

Markets exist in time as well as in space. Every sale 
has a date as well as a postmark. Radio makes it possi- 
ble to support that market — that week's sales — with ad- 



vertising. Each week's market can be protected as well as 
each town's market. 

I)a\time radio brings the advertising message not only 
to the place of use of the product, but can also bring it 
at the precise time of use of the product. 



p.s 



See: Editorial 

IsSUe: 16 January 1950 

Subject: lightning that talks 



When sponsor first announced that it would devote its 
entire issue of 30 January to radios all-industry film 
presentation, LIGHTNING THAT TALKS, the committee 
in charge had tentatively planned to hold the film's New 
York premiere early in February. The committee was 
forced to move up the date of the New York premiere to 
the first week in March because of difficulty in obtaining 
large enough quarters for the expected crowd of 1,000 or 
more top-level advertising agency, sponsor, governmental 
and radio industry executives. 

Premiere showings of LIGHTNING THAT TALKS in 
other key cities throughout the country will be held as 
originally planned, most of them taking place the first 
week in February. SPONSOR decided to stick to its orig- 
inal date for the souvenir radio presentation issue in or- 
der to coincide with the many premieres being held the 
month of the souvenir edition's publication. 







24 



SPONSOR 




I ATE AGAIN ? 

CALL, WIRE, WRITE FOR INFO ON RADIO'S 
ONLY NEW AND PROVEN TRANSCRIBED SERIAL 



SECOND SPRING 



a 



Also Great Musicals 

PLANTATION HOUSE PARTY HOSPITALITY TIME EDDY ARNOLD SHOW 



RADIO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

MONOGRAM BUILDING NASHVILLE 3, TENNESSEE 

SALES AGENCY: MONOGRAM RADIO PROGRAMS, INC. 




CHICAGO 
AN 3-7169 



NASHVILLE 

4-1751 



30 JANUARY 1950 



25 




26 



SPONSOR 



~twz£z. 



Radio and Television will best serve the public inter- 
est—and their own— each by seeking the field to which 
it is better adapted, and by doing the best job pos- 
sible in that field. 

We believe that Du Mont has reason to be proud of 
its contributions to Television. Du Mont's bold pio- 
neering of co-op and syndicated programs for the 
local station. .. Du Mont's theory, now widely put into 
practice, of high calibre shows at low cost to the 
advertiser— all are made possible by Du Mont's spe- 
cialization in Television. 

If it's Television— that's our business. Call on us freely. 



E V 




N 



AMERICA'S WINDOW ON THE WORLD 



T W 



DUMONT TELEVISION NETWORK • 515 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 22, N . Y. 

30 JANUARY 1950 



Copyright 1950, Alltn B. DuMonl loborotorles. Inc. 



27 



ITS EASY. 



IF YOU 
KNOW HOW! 




We 



e could paint a very fancy picture of all the things 
that make KWKH a truly outstanding station — but it would 
boil down to this: a "native-son" flair for Southern program- 
ming, together with 24 years of solid radio experience in this 
market. Know-How, we call it. . . . 

Latest Shreveport Hoopers (Nov.-Dec. '49) prove that 
KWKH's formula and methods really pay off: 

For Total Rated Periods, KWKH gets a 
52.0% greater Share of Audience than 
the next station. 

These figures are for Shreveport only, of course. But better 
yet, KWKH delivers an equally loyal rural audience through- 
out our prosperous oil, timber and agricultural area. 

Let us send you all the facts, today! 



KWKH 



€1 



50,000 Watts 



Texas 

3TnS131IMIlHUlr:l 

Arkansas 
CBS Mississippi 

The Branham Company, Representatives 
Henry Clay, General Manager 



510 Madison 



enabled the production of a talking 
motion picture that I sincerely believe 
is unmatched in any trade association 
promotional activity. 

Adequately promoted, properly pre- 
sented and promptly followed. LIGHT- 
NING THAT TALKS can enable the 
broadcasting industries to move into 
new high ground in local, network and 
national spot sales. May I urge you 
with all of the sincerity I can command 
to do your personal part to see that the 
showing of this talking motion picture 
in your community is presented with 
all the showmanship at \ oui command. 
Now, may I add a word of deep ap- 
preciation and sincere thanks to SPON- 
SOR for devoting the 30 January is- 
sue to the All-Radio Presentation. It 
is an outstanding example of intelli- 
gent serving of industry interests. 

Lewis H. Avery 
President 
Avery-Knodel Inc. 



It was George F. Baker, the banker, 
who said "Few people can fullv com- 
prehend the meaning of a MILLION 
whether we are speaking of dollars or 
of people." Multiplied many, many 
times over, that has always been the 
nub of radio's problem: No one — not 
even we who are closest to it — can 
fully comprehend the meaning or scope 
of a medium which, regularly, talks to 
over 39,000,000 families. 

I am delighted that in LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS the full play of still an- 
other medium — motion picture presen- 
tation — is brought to bear on visualiz- 
ing the size and impact of radio. And 
I feel that now, full swing in another 
buyers market, is the ideal time for 
radio to re\ iew and recount its many 
advantages as a medium. 

Two things about the film particu- 
lars impress me. First, I understand 
it is directed especially at a new mar- 
ket: the many advertisers who have 
imi used radio and who ma\ derive 
real benefits from its use. And, sec- 
ond. I understand that the effective- 
ness of the film is to be heightened by 
local showings throughout the coun- 
li\. As the pioneers of local penetra- 
tion in network radio, we know that 
that is the best approach! 

The \merican Broadcasting ("om- 

( Please turn to page 30) 



28 



SPONSOR 



/. 



[OUERRGE 



WOAI's Primary Market has always been a 
bright spot in the nation's economic picture. Today, 
day and night, a half-million families who spend over 
a billion dollars over grocery, drug and other retail 
counters, have the WOAI listening habit! (Check 
Hooper or BJN1B). • Already rich in oil, cotton, 
cattle and other agricultural products, WOAI's South- 
west now is one of the nation's industrial hot spots! 
(Ask your Banker). • That means more people who 
make and spend more money on more products! 
There's no substitute for WOAI's coverage of this 
ever richer market. • Hooper's latest Listening 
Area Index shows WOAI with two times as many 
listening families daytime, three times as many night- 
time, as the next most listened to station. For avail- 
abilities . . . (Ask Petry). 



Represented Nationally By 

Edward Petry & Company, Inc. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES • ST. LOUIS 
DALLAS • SAN FRANCISCO • DETROIT • ATLANTA 



THERE 
IS 

no 

SUBSTITUTE 
FOR 











•^UUJUJIU 



in 

THE 

SOUTHWEST 



30 JANUARY 1950 



29 



Because it takes 
good selling 
to make 
good sales... 



1950 



will be the 



We predict, 



BEST YEAR YET for 



We repeat- 
it takes good selling 
to make good sales 



—thanks 

to the 

efforts of 

radio's 

new film 

presentation 

and the 

National 

Association 

of Radio 

Representatives 




H (Alt .<-. llttff MIW • ». N f 

IADIO I TIllVIJION IEPIISINTA Tivil 
Miw *ott • CHICAGO • lO» *•-'■. i.e. • Ian IUnCiKO 



510 Madison 



STORY NEEDED TELLING 

pany. the Columbia Broadcasting Sys- 
tem and the National Broadcasting 
Compan\ . the National Association of 
Broadcasters and the almost six hun- 
dred independent stations who are co- 
operating are to be congratulated. 

Frank White 

President 

Mutual Broadcasting System 



LIGHTNING THAT TALKS ver) 

ably tells the ston of the impact of 
sound radio upon the American way of 
life. It shows why sound broadcasting 
toda\ is a more vital selling force and 
a greater public service than ever be- 
fore in its 30 years of existence. 

The NAB, the independent stations 
and the networks associated with the 
creation of LIGHTNING THAT 
TALKS are to be congratulated upon 
producing a film of which the industry 
can well be proud. 

Joseph H. McConnell 

President 

ABC, Netv York 



As chairman of the All-Radio Pres- 
entation committee I would first like 
to express my appreciation and the 
thanks of the other members of the All- 
Radio Presentation committee to SPON- 
SOR for devoting its entire 30 January- 
issue to LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. 

For a long time radio was too busy 
to promote itself, but we feel that 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS is the 
first stej) in a long series of radio pro- 
motional efforts that will be planned 
in the future. 

The members of the committee have 
spent long hours and even some of 
their own money to see that this pres- 
entation of all radio is the best selling 
tool that has been so far devised in 
radio's behalf. The fact that sponsor 
has devoted an entire issue to the 
mo\ ie is gratifying proof that our pres- 
entation is important. We know that 
both the people m and out of the radio 
industrv will agree when they see 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. 

There has been a whale of a lot of 
unselfish cooperation on the part of 
this committee, which worked many, 
mam hours to do a job for this indus- 
trv. and I am personally ver\ proud to 

I Please turn to page 02 I 



REACH 



MORE 



PEOPLE IN 

HANNIBALAND* 

AT A 

LOWER 

COST 

PER 

THOUSAND 

with 

KHMO 

Hannibaland is the rich 38 
county area surrounding Hanni- 
bal, Qumcy and Keokuk. In a 
recent Conlan study of listening 
habits, KHMO showed a larger 
share of audience than any of the 
other stations surveyed in this 
area. Also, KHMO's cost per 
1000 families is 55.2<7 f less than 
that of the closest competitive 
station. So for reaching and 
selling the people in this rich 
rural area of Hannibaland, buy 
the station that is listened to 
most — buy KHMO. 

KHMO 

Mutual Network 



Hannibal, Mo. 



5,000 watts 

1,000 at night 



1070 kc. 



Representative 
JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 



30 



SPONSOR 




That's the KXYZ story — as simple as that. It 
actually costs less money to dominate the great 
Houston and Gulf Coast market when you con- 
centrate your sales effort on KXYZ. 

Houston listens to KXYZ. For years, KXYZ has 
consistently led the morning Hooper ratings 
with the largest percentage of the listening 
audience . . . giving advertisers more for their 
air dollar! In addition, KXYZ hacks your 
advertising with a planned promotion and 
advertising campaign. 

If you want to open the door to the richest 
market in the Southwest, place your 
message on KXYZ — and get more 
for your air dollar! 




EDUCATION 




PUBIIC SERVICE 



A GLENN MCCARTHY 
ENTERPRISE 






QUIZ 



£k S 



ABC IN HOUSTON 

DIAL 1 320 • 5000 WATTS 
Free & Peters, Representatives 



30 JANUARY 1950 



31 






40% m&ie tadia tiomeA, 
t&tut t&ety did in, 1943— and 
at a Cmu&i ctet fieri 



^ 



H ID 

H REE & V ETERS, INC 

Pioneer Radio <m<l Television Station Representatives 

Since 1932 



VII \\T\ 



\1 \\ YORK ( HICAGO 

Dl fROIT IT. WORTH HOLLYWOOD 



SAN I RA\< ISCO 



EAST, SOUTHEAST 



WBZ-WBZA 


Boston-Springfield 


WGR 


Buffalo 


WMCA 


New York 


KYW 


Philadelphia 


KDKA 


Pittsburgh 


WFBL 


Syracuse 


WCSC 


Charleston, S. C. 


WIS 


Columbia, S. C. 


WGH 


Norfolk 


WPTF 


Raleigh 


WDBJ 


Roanoke 



NBC 


50,000 


CBS 


5,000 


IND. 


5,000 


NBC 


50,000 


NBC 


50,000 


CBS 


5,000 


CBS 


5,000 


NBC 


5,000 


ABC 


5,000 


NBC 


50,000 


CBS 


5,000 



MIDWEST, SOUTHWEST 



WHO 


Des Moines 


NBC 


50,000 


woe 


Davenport 


NBC 


5,000 


WDSM 


Duluth-Superior 


ABC 


5,000* 


WDAY 


Fargo 


NBC 


5,000 


WOWO 


Fort Wayne 


ABC 


10,000 


WISH 


Indianapolis 


ABC 


5,000 


KMBC-KFRM 


Kansas City 


CBS 


5,000 


WAVE 


Louisville 


NBC 


5,000 


WTCN 


Minneapolis-St. Paul 


ABC 


5,000 


KFAB 


Omaha 


CBS 


50,000 


WMBD 


Peoria 


CBS 


5,000 


KSD 


St. Louis 


NBC 


5,000 


KFDM 


Beaumont 


ABC 


5,000 


KRIS 


Corpus Christi 


NBC 


1,000 


WBAP 


Ft. Worth-Dallas 


NBC-ABC 


50,000 


KXYZ 


Houston 


ABC 


5,000 


KTSA 


San Antonio 


CBS 


5,000 



MOUNTAIN AND WEST 



KOB 


Albuquerque 


KDSH 


Boise 


KVOD 


Denver 


KGMB-KHBC 


Honolulu-Hilo 


KEX 


Portland, Ore. 


KIRO 


Seattle 



NBC 


50,000 


CBS 


5,000 


ABC 


5,000 


CBS 


5,000 


ABC 


50,000 


CBS 


50,000 



CP 







*?*** 



\ 





feet of film 



Some cold and warming' facts on the radio 
industry's presentation to advertisers 



The cold statistics on lightning that talks are these. 

The finished film runs 4.000 feet. But 50.000 feet were shot. 

Director Ben Gradus and his permanent crew of six travelled 25,000 
miles. The) went on location to California. Georgia, Iowa, and Long Island. 
n all. 00 people worked on the film. 

These are the cold facts. As sponsor dug deep into the making of a 
movie it uncovered warmer data. 

It learned heartwarming facts about men who make such things possible. 

About Vic Ratner, who compiled three unique volumes of facts and 
figures preliminary to the writing of a script, and who spent a "vacation" 
in New England working on a final draft. 

About Frank Stanton, who saw nothing novel in giving the industry 
Ratner's services, compliments of CBS, for weeks at a stretch. 

\liout fellows like Cordon Cray, Frank Pellegrin, Lew Avery, Byron 
McGill. George Wallace, Hanque Ringgold. Ivor Kenway, Ed Spencer. 
Ralph Weil. Harry Maizlish and others on the All-Radio Presentation 
Committee who traveled incessantly and paid out incessant I\ during many 
months of feverish activity — with never a thought of repayment. 

About Judge Justin Miller, who saw the potential of such a film and 
allowed the busy Maurice Mitchell to steal time from other urgent projects 
in order to participate up to his neck. 

These credits could go on and on. But we think we make our point 
about the spirit that enfuses LIGHTNING tii VT talks and the radio industry . 

In the pages that follow sponsor has attempted to catch the flavor of the 
film and hold it for the many who view the premieres and want something 
to remember it by. In this issue arc stories <>n the history of the presenta- 
tion and on its promotion. Four articles were devoted to the success stories 
documented in LIGHTNING THAT TALKS and sponsors staff added details 
of these stories which it was impossible for the film to cover. 







Editoi 



Guitar solo by director of all-radio film puts its two youngest actors in mood to perform 



NORTH CAROLINA IS THE SOUTH'S 

NUMBER ONE STATE 




AND NORTH CAROLINA'S 



No 




50,000 WATTS 680 KC 

NBC AFFILIATE 



SALESMAN is 

WPTP 

* also WPTF-FM * 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

FREE & PETERS, INC 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




IT TOOK ALL THE FILM CANS SHOWN TO MAKE FINISHED REELS THAT VICTOR RATNER IS RECEIVING FROM THE PRODUCERS 



Radio breaks its silence 



LIGHTNING THAT TALKS brings radio's 



dynamic storv lo the nation's advertisers 



It's here. 

The All-Radio Presentation has been 
completed and during thi- month it 
will premiere in several pari.- of the 
countr) . 

Those who see the movie are in for 
a treat las well as a treatment). 
Called LIGHTNING THAT TALKS, 
it's a full-len«th documentary which 
tells the storj of radio's impacl on the 
American people and lias an exciting 
impact of its ow n. 



LIGHTNING THAT TALKS makes 
historj . because: 

1. It's the first presentation bj an) 
medium which uses documentarj 
movie techniques to demonstrate the 
effect of the medium. Much of it was 
shot in the homes of radio listeners; 
it shows what actuall) happens when 
thc\ hear commercials. 

2. It's the firsl reall) full-dress pro- 
motion drive in the bistorj ol broad- 
casting. The movie mark- a new 



phase in the industry's development. 
From now on radio men are deter- 
mined to talk up after \ ears of nla- 
ti\ e silence. 

3. As an industrial movie, LIGHT- 
NING i- revolutionary. It combines 
fantas) with realism to tell a stm\ 
which won't preach at or talk down to 
its audience of husine-Miien and ad- 
vertising executives. 

In a w a\ the sponsoi - and ad\ ci tid- 
ing men al « hom the mo» te is aimed 



30 JANUARY 1950 



37 



SPARKS FLYING FROM THE WIRE (RIGHT) WERE ONES PHOTOGRAPHED STRIKING BEN FRANKLIN'S KEY (SEE COVER PICTURE) 



are themselves largely responsible for 
its production. 

For years these users of broadcast 
advertising have felt that radio lagged 
in self-promotion. They've said so 
often. cspecialK when the\ were faced 
with the problem of convincing top- 
level brass about the value of some 
specific radio project. It was this 
ground swell of opinion from without 
the industry that helped lone the issue. 

But it was an idea in the back of 
NBC vice-president Charles P. Ham- 



mond's head that got things started. 

Hammond felt that networks could 
tell a lot stronger sales story if they 
acted as a unit instead of sprinkling 
their individual arguments like buck- 
shot. He went to the J. Walter Thomp- 
son agency (which represents NBC • 
in the summer of 1947. asked wise 
heads there what they thought of his 
idea for an all-network selling drive. 

The J. Walter Thompson executives 
thought the idea was good and Ham- 
mond called a network meeting to sug- 



gest some kind of presentation. Those 
who attended that historic meeting in 
his office were Ivor kenway. ABC vice- 
president; Dave Frederick, then adver- 
tising director of CBS; Louis Haus- 
man of CBS: and E. P. H. James, then 
vice-president of Mutual. 

At about the same time a similar 
scheme was brewing within the NAB. 

But it was the network group which 
was first to get together on a project 
with a definite budget I a total of $50,- 
000 put up by NBC, CBS, ABC). The 



Gordon Gray, chairman of the All-Radio Presentation Committee 




The if did the work 



The story presented on these pages tells the full history of the 
All-Radio Presentation. Here are the names of the committee 
members without whose efforts there wouldn't have been any story: 
Gordon Gray (WIP), committee president — chairman; Victor M. 
Ratnor (formerly CBS, now with R. H. Macy), vice president in 
charge of production; Maurice B.Mitchell ( BAB ), secretary; Herbert 
L. Krueger (WTAG), treasurer; Ivor Kenway (ABC); George 
Wallace (NBC); W. B. McGill ( Westinghouse Radio Stations, Phila- 
delphia); Lewis Avery ( Avery-Knodel, Inc.); Frank E. Pellegrin 
(Transit Radio, Inc.); F. E. Spencer, Jr. (George P. Hollingbery 
Co.); Ralph Weil (WOV); Leonard Asch (WBCA); Will Baltin 
(TBA); Bond Geddes (RMA); Ellis Atteberry (WJBC); Harry 
Maizlish (KFWB); Irving Rosenhaus (WAAT). 




>* 




V 



,\ 




FILM EDITORS EXAMINE VARIOUS "TAKES." THE BEST ONES WERE THEN SELECTED FOR THE FINAL VERSION OF THE MOVIE 



networks at that stage had no idea as 
to what form their presentation would 
take. Their first problem was to get 
the right man to produce it. They 
wanted someone who knew radio but 
was not of it. someone who could look 
on radio problems with perspecti\r. 

Victor Ratner got the job. For 
many years he'd been an outstanding 
promotion man for CBS. But in 1947 
he was out of the radio industry and 
running his own public relations and 
promotion business. For these reasons 



the network group felt his background 
was ideal and retained him to produce 
their presentation. 

Ratner went to work for the net- 
works in the summer of 1947. imme- 
diately suggested the presentation be 
given in the form of a movie. That 
was about as far as he got before he 
was back right smack in the middle of 
radio as vice-president in charge of 
promotion for CBS. It was agreed. 
however, that he would go on with 
production of the network presentation 



in his spare time and without a fee. 

Meanwhile. NAB plans also were 
coming to a head. 

The chairman of the Sales Managers 
Executive Committee of the NAB for 
1947 was Gene Thomas, now general 
manager of W'OIC. then with WOR. 
Thomas knew that sentiment at that 
time was running high among NAB 
members for some kind of all-radio 
promotion drive. Recognizing this de- 
sire on the part of the membership, he 
i Please turn to page 82 i 



Scene from film (below left) shows journalism professor giving talk which slights radio advertising. Maurice Mitchell makes rebuttal (below right) 





I \ ■ 







WHAT IF ALL ITEMS FROM AVERAGE HOME THAT RADIO SOLD WERE THROWN OUT ON LAWN? SCENE (ABOVE) IS ONE RESULT 



FACTS THAT TALK 



II i-lili-his culled from the extensive research 



that wciii into All-ltadio Presentation film 



Radio in the I nited Mate-, like gov- 
ernment in the I nited States, derives 
it- great power essentially from tin- 
people, ami nowhere else. People have 
accepted radio overwhelmingl) as .1 
dominant habit in their lives. 

It i- more intimatel) associated with 
more people than movies, magazines 
ami newspapers, bathtubs, or tele- 
phones. 'I hi- and much more is 
summed up in the Ul-Radio film. 



LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. 

Bui the ti ue expei iences depicted in 
the movie in which radio sells dia- 
monds in a department store; builds a 
chain of supermarkets; puts a milk 
compan) in business 'and makes it a 
leader in its area I ; opens doors to in- 
surance salesmen, these typical su< ess 
stories do not "tell all." 

Thousands of man-hours of research 
went into the preparation of data from 



which the presentation \\a- finally 
strained. Following are some of the 

highlights presented in the film either 
direct!) or 1>\ implication, ["he theme 
might be "" America the Market I'lace — 
How Radio Reaches and Sell- It." 

• • • 

Hie market place is people. Since 
1930 alone, 20,000,000 morr of them. 
In L930: 123.0 millions: 1948 (Oct.) : 

1 50.0 million-. 



40 



SPONSOR 



Families grow still faster. In L930: 

29.9 millions: 1948: 38.6 millions. 



The market place is land. America's 
great regions are almost nations in 
themselves. Each has marked, homog- 
enous characteristics of its own: Far 
West, Mountain States, Southwest. 
South. Middle West. New England. 
Middle Atlantic States, etc. The land 
has so much climate it's always sum- 
mer somewhere in the I nited States. 



America is the greatest market place 
on earth. It has been able to develop 
its resources far more than any other 
area in the world. And there's a rea- 
son. It's not in our vast land area or 
natural resources I other nations had 
more of both I . 



Not in the increase of our popula- 
tion {other nations have more). \ ot 
in our isolation from other countries 
during our formative years [others 
have been more isolated I . 

The answer lies in all these things 
plus something else — something that 
Ben Franklin helped to design and start 
— our political democracy. This great- 
est of all experiments in self-govern- 
ment made unique economic patterns 
in America, too. 



It stimulated more people to produce 
more wealth. It spread the forces of 
competition over more products . . . 
stimulated more people to produce bet- 
ter values . . . distributed more wealth 
over more people. 



The Mass Production Of Customers 

Mass production of goods is mean- 
ingless without mass consumption - 
just as it is helpless without mass dis- 
tribution and voiceless without mass 
advertising. We have created custom- 
ers faster in the past twenty years than 
at any other time in our historv. In 
1906 Wbodrow Wilson said: "Nothing 
has spread socialist feeling in this 
country more than the automobile . . . 
they are a picture of the arrogance of 
wealth with all its independence and 
carelessness." 



But socialism didn't come — people 
got automobiles instead . . . and refrig- 
erators, electric toasters, washing ma- 
chines, telephones, etc. The mass pro- 
I Please turn to page 121 I 



How big is Radio? 



1 fiW 

families 

families 



Auto 
families 




42,800.000(95% 




Source. BAB Estimates lor 1951 



How much do they listen daily ? 



U.S. radio family-listening: by INCOMES 



U.S. AVERAGE 4 h,s 32' 

1 hi 1 hrs 3 hrs 4 hrs. 




upper 
incomes 



^BSS^ 



middle 
incomes 

lower 
incomes 



4 h M3' 



4* 37' 



4* 45' 






U.S. radio family listening: by CITY SIZE 




U.S. AVERAGE 4 h,i 32' 

3 hrs. 4 hrs. 

4 K 37' 



k£li 



medium size 
cities 



small cities 
and rural 



4 h,s 28' 



4 lri 33' 



Surer i. C Hiilsia Ci. 



30 JANUARY 1950 



41 




Maurice Mitchell hands his secretary an order for the All-Radio film LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 



Premieres 



don't come often 



How lo make Mm* mosi of vour local showing 



of I M.IMMM, THAT TALKS 



Across the nation advertisers and 
advertising men are getting their first 
look at LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 
this month. All who see the film will 
realize that long. hard, and effective 
work went into its production. But 
there's another side to the story. A lot 
of hard work is being done now as 
well to promote the movie and distrib- 
ute it efficiently. 

It's the local subscribers who bear 
the brunt of this post-production work. 
But the All-Radio Presentation Com- 
mittee itself is helping to make sure 
that viewers enjoy the movie by dis- 
tributing well thought out suggestions 
for showings. 

Subscribers have found that sugges- 
tions of the All-Radio Presentation 
Committee are easy to execute. And 
promotions are being directed largely 
by top management, thus lending the 
presentations necessary prestige. 

Plans for the various premieres are 
being completed by local committees. 
These organizations have a free hand 
in preparing their presentations, with 
the All-Radio Committee on the side- 
lines, ready to help only when called 
upon by subscribers. 

Some local committees are schedul- 
ing luncheon premieres. Many are 
making the film showings part of high- 
lv publicized dinner parties. Lunch- 
eon presentations are generally limited 
to one and one-half hours. 

At cocktail parties it is recommend- 
ed that the film be shown first, with 
cocktails immediately following. Din- 
ner premieres are elaborate and in- 
clude entertainment. The movie is 
shown immediately following dinner 
whenever possible. 

New York City's gala presentation 
is typical of what is being done 
throughout the nation on a smaller 
scale. The combination dinner and 
premiere is to be held in the Grand 
Ballroom of the Waldorf-Astoria, 
March 1. Twelve hundred prominent 
guests are invited and Bing Cro-l>\ 
and Bob Hope will be among the per- 
formers. Fred Waring's orchestra will 
supply the music. And General Dwighl 
I). Lix'tiliowcr is tentatively scheduled 
to speak about the radio industry in 
the next half century . 

To keep the presentation paced 
properly, the New York committee 
felt it was necessary to close the eve- 
ning with a strong event. The night at 
the Waldorf, therefore, ends with an 
open discussion. Guests can comment 
about radio as a successful, conlinual- 



42 



SPONSOR 



ly growing medium, 
moderator of the American Broadcast- 
ing Company's program "Town Meet- 
ing of the Air," will preside. 

A number of foremost Americans 
are to precede the session with brief 
topic summaries. They are: Henrv 
Ford II; Harvey Firestone. Jr.: David 
Lilienthal; Harold Stassen; and others. 

Through hard-hitting promotions 
the All-Radio Committee is arousing 
9trong national interest in the film. 
The approximately 600 stations plan- 
ning to show the movie in their com- 
munities will find an eager, receptive 
audience of local businessmen. 

Subscribers have found that there 
are many advantages in holding collec- 
tive showings. Expenses are lighter; 
the presentation bigger. The combina- 
tion of working facilities and top 
brains can produce the promotion with 
least effort. More high ranking busi- 
ness people are reached. Although the 
cost for a single organization is rela- 
tively low in a collective showing, the 
total expenditure is a sizable amount. 

Many communities have only one 
subscriber station. Such stations have 
found it advisable to invite non-sub- 
scribers to participate in the premiere. 
Here, too. expenses are shared and the 
operation expanded. The guest lists 
are increased; more advertisers are 
reached more easily. 

Subscribers scheduling individual 
premieres favor the use of 20-minute 
condensations cut from the master 
film. There are two such condensa- 
tions. One shows the social benefits 
of radio in America. The other em- 
phasizes success stories and is intend- 
ed as a sales clincher. 

Plans for many local showings are 
already concrete. 

In Charlotte. North Carolina, sta- 
tions WBT. WSOC. WAYS, and WIST 
are co-sponsoring the presentation for 
the city's key business people. A sec- 
ond showing is planned for owners of 
small businesses, many of whom are 
potential sponsors. 

The Phoenix. Arizona, showing co- 
incides with the Board of Directors 
meeting of the National Association of 
Broadcasters. President Justin Miller 
and the entire Board will attend this 
premiere. 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana, business- 
men are to see the film at a special 
luncheon. Stations WAFB, WJBO. 
WLCS, and WLCA are getting this 
showing into shape. The premiere will 
(Please turn to page 62) 



George Denny. Filtn «».v<-/i «m/<« makes «nr<» I K.ll I \!\(. will 'strike' 




One of Modern Talking Picture's 26 exchanges distributing prints to stations throughout the nation 




Prints returned to exchange after a premiere are closely insp 



mage by servicemen 




Film being rewound in cleaning apparatus is checked by servicemen to guarantee perfect print 



30 JANUARY 1950 



43 




ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE RADIO SPECIAL ON ME TOO'S MORNING MUSICAL CLOCK PROGRAM BROUGHT OUT THIS CROWD 



What would you do with a carload of over-ripe peaches? 
Here's how Me Too handled the problem 



They had 

to use radio 



Success Story No. 1 

in LIGH I MV. I HAT I \i.Kn 




,{ Housewives say fresh peach special is good buy, go to market early 




I Me Too manager considers items for the next day's radio spacial 



£ Decision made, housewives hear about it on 8:30-9:45 musical clock 



"What made this happen?" 

A mass of people jamming the streets 
around the ME TOO supermarket in 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A long line of 
people stretching clear around the 
hlock. Head of the line at a truck of 
peaches in front of the store. People 
buying crates of fruit directly off the 
open back of the truck. 

Ben Franklin, coming upon this 
scene in LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. 
wonders in astonishment what's behind 
it. As a matter of fact, the truck and 
people weren't "props" and "extras"; 
the buying and selling wasn't just 
acting for the camera. 

This was the real thing. 

The cameras actually caught the 



opening of business one morning at 
Bill Drake's ME TOO No. 1 supermar- 
ket. And it happened because of a 
radio program. I The same thing hap- 
pened simultaneously at eight other 
Drake stores in the area. I 

For Bill Drake, in 1936. there 
weren't any supermarkets. He operat- 
ed Drakes Store in Blairstown. near 
Cedar Rapids, and four small stores in 
nearby towns. Then Weaver Witwer, 
Drake's wholesale grocery supplier, 
bought the old Post Office building in 
Cedar Rapids with the idea of convert- 
ing the lower floor into a grocery. He 
thought his aggressive, up-and-coming 
friend Bill Drake was just the man to 
break into the fiercely contested Cedar 



Rapids food market. W ith W itwer's 
blessing. Drake was willing to try. 

The store was ready for business in 
August, 1937. Meanwhile, salesmen 
from the Cedar Rapids Gazette and 
station WMT had been assiduously 
wooing Drake. On their side, the news- 
paper salesmen had the force of tradi- 
tion. Newspaper space was the natural 
medium for any retail outlet, particu- 
larly a food store. It gave the house- 
wife-shopper an opportunity to study 
the "record" of items and prices of- 
fered, etc. 

At that time the now famous Lazars- 
feld study comparing the effect of 
newspaper ads and radio commercials 
[Please turn to page 66) 




J Peach special sold by crate. Farmer buys extra supply for canninc 



t» You Did? manager learns radio special sold out by noon in stores 




PROBLEM 



Success Story No. 2 

in LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 



MUt^tt 'tlttH 



CUSTOMERS 




LIGHTNING THAT TALKS makes 
the point that radio can sell anything. 
To help prove that point the movie in- 
cludes a sequence ahout an air cam- 
paign that sold diamonds diamonds 
by the dozens. The sequence concerns 
a department store manager who made 
an exacting comparison test of radio 
versus newspapers. He spent $400 in 
newspaper advertising one month, then 
matched it another month with $400 
on the air and got this result : 

The black and white ads sold only 
two diamonds in a month. 

The radio commercials sold over 1QQ 
diamonds in two weeks, later account- 
ed for many more. 

Locale for this fascinating advertis- 
ing experiment was Columbus, Geor- 
gia. An industrial center with a popu- 
lation of 175.000. Columbus is on the 
states western border and can draw 
business from many counties in Ala- 
bama as well as from nearby Fort 
Benning. the world's largest infantry 
training camp. The second biggest de- 
partment store in this active business 
town is the one that sold diamonds on 
the air — Davison's. 

Davison's in Columbus is one of a 
chain of four stores (formerly Davison- 
Paxon ) in the South (other three are 
at Atlanta. Macon. Augusta). All of the 
Davison stores are affiliated ivith H. H. 
Mac) & Company. 

The Columbus branch opened just 




PROBLEM: manager of department store 
tells radio station man he has sick baby 

INTEREST: teaser campaign on air at- 
tracts interest of potential diamond buyers 

CUSTOMERS: soon after air campaign be- 
gins the "sick baby" is a thriving department 

SUCCESS: store manager congratulates ra- 
dio station man, promises to stay on the air 



SUCCESS 



couldn't sell diamonds 



Then along came an enterprising' radio station president who 
asked for $400 and just one month 



about a year ago in a brand-new build- 
ing with a modernistic front. There 
was something new inside as well. For 
the first time in the history of depart- 
ment store operation in that part of 
Georgia, the new store had an expen- 
sive jewelry department. Previously 
department stores in that sector had 
sold only low-cost costume jewelry. 

To start his jewelry department off 
with what he hoped would be a bang, 
the manager of Davison's began a daily 
newspaper campaign. Each day for a 
month he placed twenty to thirty inch 
displays in the two local papers push- 
ing the jewelry department. Cost at 
the Davison's discount rate was about 
$1.00 a column inch and the total 
black and white bill for a month came 
to $400. 



But instead of a bang there was a 
fizzle. In a month only two diamonds 
were sold. Although other jewelry 
items did move, slowly, diamonds were 
the important thing. They are the big 
mark-up items on any jewelry counter. 
Bill Byrd, Davison's manager, knew 
what the trouble was. People in that 
area just weren't used to going into a 
department store for diamond rings 
and bracelets. He had a job of educa- 
tion on his hands. 

Actually, Byrd seemed to have every- 
thing in his favor. He could offer dia- 
monds at ten percent below rates of 
local jewelers; his store in general was 
doing a good business, had acquired a 
fine reputation. But newspaper ads had 
failed to ram his story home. Byrd 
called in a friend from the local Ki- 



wanis organization and asked for sug- 
gestions. It was a wise move. 

The Kiwanis brother was Allen 
Woodall, president of WDAK, a Co- 
lumbus 250 watter which was then an 
ABC affiliate ( NBC affiliated since Sep- 
tember 1, 1949 1 . The conversation 
Byrd and Woodall had at that time is 
reenacted in part in LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS. It was significant be- 
cause it shows how a reasonably typi- 
cal local merchant ivho has never used 
radio extensively reacts and thinks as 
he prepares to go into broadcast adver- 
tising. Here's about the way it went: 

Byrd: "You know I've got a sick 
baby on my hands. You've been tell- 
ing me I ought to use radio since we 
opened up. Maybe this is the time. 
{Please turn to page 96) 



Director of movie gives acting pointers to radio man and store manager This setup was needed to film night scene (see picture p. 46) 




The big drive 



In San Francisco, Marin Dell milk 

shot from fourth to first place in one 
year. And radio gets the credit 



Success Story No. 3 

in LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 



The people of San Francisco county 
bought enough Marin Dell milk in that 
cooperatives first year of operation to 
make it the number one distributor of 
milk in the county. That was in 1935. 

Today. 14 years later. Marin Dell is 
still the leader. And it didn't take a 
miracle to keep it that way. 



In the teeth of fierce competition 
from long established regional and na- 
tional distributors — more than a dozen 
of them originally — it seemed that the 
Marin Dell Milk Company would need 
a miracle even to break into the 
San Francisco market. 

But a certain Thomas Foster didn't 




pre-dawn 3 



all routs plant superintendent MacDonald out to man truck in opening San 
ose route. Radio had already pre-conditioned customers to Marin Dell 



look at it that way. He knew that retail 
outlets would have to take the Marin 
Dell line if enough of their customers 
asked for their products by name. And 
he figured the "'miracle" to make that 
happen had already come to pass. It 
only required, as he saw it. adaptation 
to the Marin Dell problem. 

Members of the newly formed dairy 
cooperative elected Foster general man- 
ager back in 1935 not just because he 
had a reputation for getting things 
done and because he knew the prob- 
lems of milk distribution. He was also 
a man with ideas. They called him 
"progressive." 

So when KFRC s commercial man- 
ager Merwyn L. McCabe huddled with 
him over the problem of cracking the 
tough San Francisco market. Foster 
didn't wince at McCabe's recommenda- 
tion that he allocate 100% of his rela- 
tively small advertising budget to one 
medium — radio. 

In 1935 radio's power to force dis- 
tribution, then keep on selling, no long- 
er seemed a miracle to those who had 
learned to use it. Marin Dell would 
set up no house-to-house routes, em- 
ploy no house-to-house canvassers. 
They had to persuade retailers to make 
room on their already crowded refrig- 
erator shelves for another brand of 
milk. Dealers weren't going to be 
happy about it. This distribution would 
have to be forced. This was a job for 
a radio station. 

McCabe felt KFRC had an answer. 
He recommended KFRCs talented m.c. 
Dean Maddox as the man who could 
engineer enough enthusiasm from 
housewives and others to make retail- 
ers take on the new line. Maddox, or 
Budda as he called himself profession- 
ally, had a program known as "Budda's 
Amateur Hour. It was an hour-long 
show aired from 8:00 to 9:00 on Sat- 
urday nights. 

One of the earliest and best of the 
local amateur talent shows, it had a 
big following, then as now. Success of 
the program, as with all shows of this 
type, depended maitiK on the person- 
alis of the m.c. 

Listeners liked Budda in the inti- 
matel) personal wa) peculiar to radio. 
The Feeling of viewers for television 
stars is not comparable to the feeling 
of rapport between a listener and his 
fa\orite radio performer. Because peo- 
ple liked Budda the\ liked to lun what 
he recommended. So Foster bought 
Budda. He stipulated that Budda do 
the commercials. 

i Please turn to page 95 I 



48 



SPONSOR 




hr|/\|lf for Marin Dell: A single truckload of dairy products heads out of San Francisco to San Jose 40 miles away. It's new territory for 
llwlll Marin Dell, which just got flash competitor was about to beat them in. Other pictures on these pages show what happened 
Truck arrived on time to beat competitors, was waiting with early customers in front of some stores before opening time 




mOOtl IACO shoppers assure Marin Dell representative and «4 l||l|TIA family which has enjoyed Marin Dell show discusses 

bdll JUOC retailer they'd like to buy Marin Dell products Ol IIUIIIC cc 



30 JANUARY 1950 



:ompany's milk. Radio helped to boost product 



49 





50 



SPONSOR 



GPOg 



Ever since the early part of the twentieth century when commercial broad- 
casts first began, advertisers and their agencies have sought a formula 
that would assure maximum sales results from the use of radio. 

Today, after proving this formula for a period of over twenty-three years, 
Fort Industry has put it on paper so that it may be readily understood. Here's 
how it works: — 

The "C" in the above formula represents Coverage, which all Fort Industry 
Stations deliver in generous amounts. The "GP", quite logically, represents 
Good Programming. On-the-spot Alert Management is represented by the 
symbol "AM", and "Og" stands for Over-all Guidance by experience-equipped 
management. 

"BPI" represents the most important part of the equation — Broadcasting In 
The Public Interest and community service — factors which have given character 
to each individual Fort Industry Station, and earned for each the status of a 
local institution, affectionately regarded, and believed in by local listeners. 

"7S" for seven Fort Industry Stations is preceded by a multiplication sign, 
and we arrive, finally, at our goal, LISTENERS PLUS SALES. This conclusion 
is extremely important because, attracting listeners is one thing, but sales 
results are another. 

So it's the sum of all the ingredients in the equation which enable all Fort 
Industry Stations to deliver listeners who respond. Q.E.D. 



THE FORT INDUSTRY COMPANY 

WSPD, Toledo, O. • WWVA, Wheeling, W. \ a. • WMMN, Fairmont. W. Va. 

WLOK, Lima, (). • WAGA, Atlanta. Ga. • WGBS, Miami, Fla. • WJBK, Detroit, Mich. 
WSPD-TV, Toledo, O. • WJBK-TV, Detroit, Mich. • WAGA-TV, Atlanta, Ga. 

National Sales Headquarters: 527 Lexington .lie., New York 17, Eldorado 5-2455 



30 JANUARY 1950 51 




JACK BERCH, FOLKSY SINGER, REACHES HOUSEWIVES IN THE MORNING. HE HAS PRODUCED MANY LEADS FOR PRUDENTIAL 



Success Story No 4. 

in LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 



Radio opens doors 



When a Prudential agent goes a-calling. 

he knows the weleome mat is out 



Onl) a few seconds of LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS are devoted to the 
scene in which a Prudential Insurance 
Compan) agenl gets his foot inside a 
kii< lien door (see pictures). \<\ thai 
shoi i dim sequence tells the basic phi- 
losoph) "I Prudential radio advertis- 
ing : "prepare the wa) foi oui agents." 

Ii was included in the mo^ ie to show 
how an outstanding advertiser uses 
broadcasting to help markel an in- 
tangible product. 

I'i udential, like other successful ail 
advertisers among insurance com- 
panies, does nut ii \ in sell insui an< e 



over the air. Instead, it aims al sell- 
ing the company, tries to build a posi- 
tive reaction i<> the Prudential name. 
The companj feels thai insurance is 

actually a custom-tailored product, 
tailored to the income, famih size, and 
standards of each famih : and thai 
merchandising this highl) flexible item 
in terms of a soap salesman's hoopla 
would he foolish. I he basic objecth e 
of it- radio advertising is to gel its 
agents through the door. Then the 
selling begins. 

How doe- the I'i udential I I'm for 
-hoi t i know uhelhei or not it has 



gained its lo ft \ objectives? II it isn't 
after direct sale-, doesn'l claim main 
such lor its radio programs, how can 
it tell what it i- getting for each of it- 
radio dollars? 

I he answer. I'm executives would 
tell you, i- that the companj definitely 
cdii'! inea-uic it- radio successes not 
direct!} . I here"- no micro-cope for 

measuring prestige. But there are 
many, man] tell-tales signs of what 
tadio ha- accomplished for I'rudential. 
Taken together, these little siirns add 

up to convincing evidence that radio 

ha- done the intended job fur 1 'ill. 



b2 



SPONSOR 



For example, there's the time Pru- 
dentials good name helped win a law 
case against overwhelming odds. 

A policy-holder had died what 
seemed to he an accidental death and 
the widow applied for double indem- 
nity, as allowed for accidental death 
under the terms of this particular con- 
tract. Company investigators made a 
routine check and came up with defi- 
nite evidence that the policy-holder 
actually had committed an elaborately- 
camouflaged suicide. I'm took the 
case to court. 

Usuallv. the odds are strongly 
against an insurance company in such 
cases. The jury listens to the evidence 
and whatever the facts its S) mpa- 
thies are with the poor widow, against 
the wealthy corportion. Rut in this 
case Pi u quickly won a unanimous ver- 
dict in its favor. 

The Prudential lawyer got to talking 
with the jurymen after the case was all 
over and one man volunteered this in- 
formation: "We all know the Pruden- 
tial wouldn't tr\ to cheat that woman. 
I've been listening to the 'Prudential 
Family Hour' for years and I'm sure 
that the Prudential is an honest com- 
pany." 

Insurance company execs aren't 
noted as raconteurs but they can tell 
dozens of such little human-interest 
anecdotes showing the effect of radio 
on their business. Another interesting 
proof of the faith radio can build was 
reported to company headquarters in 
Newark a short time ago. 

A wealthy man died, leaving his af- 
fairs in the hands of an incompetent 
lawyer. The lawyer managed to jum- 
ble up the dead mans papers suffi- 
ciently so that there was a dela\ of 
several months before a claim was filed 
with the Prudential. Soon after, the 
agent who had sold the polic) went to 
visit the widow with the check due her. 
He felt rather apprehensive, was sure 
the widow would be put out over the 
delay and blame Prudential. 

Hut the lad) was gracious and 
friendly, although completelv unaware 
that the lawyer was to blame for the 
delay. "I've just wailed patiently," 
she said, "because I knew Prudential 
wouldn't have taken all this time un- 
less there was a good reason." It 
turned out the widow and her hu-band 
had listened to the "FamiK Hour" to- 
gether for years. Obviously she had 
taken its commercials to heart. 

I Please lain to page 75 1 



APPROACH 













Scenes taken directly from All-Radio film show how mention of Jack Berch softens prospect 



30 JANUARY 1950 



53 



No. 1 of a series 







I 






♦ 






'Agatha!" 
It was the Chief. Something 
wrong. Orange juice in the 
inkwell again? Anything 
could happen in the Miami 
office of the U. S. Census 
Bureau. Probably another 
housing project that wasn't 
there last night. 
"Agatha! Where are the 
blanhcty-blank blanks?" 
"The blanks, Chief? The ones 
we gotta get filled out? 
Why, here they are on your 
desk . . . all 267,739 of 
them." 
Efficient Agatha. 

But the Chief knew that 
wasn't enough . . . for 
bustling, booming Mi- 
ami in 1950 boasts 514,- 
000 . . . over a half mil- 
lion consumers of over a 
half billion dollars 
worth of goods at retail. 
It takes a big station to 
cover a big city and 20 
extra counties. It takes 
the station with the 
highest share of -audi- 
ence, the top network 
and local shows. Any 
,Katz man will prove it. 




RTS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS... 



—continued from page 2— 

Radio audience turnover 
builds circulation 

Magazines have been talking about their "audience" 
figures (not ABC circulation figures) — the number 
of different people who read a given issue of a 
magazine in a month. Unlike the magazine calcu- 
lation, radio listeners, most of them, have heard 
the same program two or three or four times in that 
month. This is the "turnover" factor. The CBS 
study "Roper Counts Customers" found that in 1940, 
17 individual programs on CBS alone had net audi- 
ences larger than LIFE 'S total "monthly audience" 
(26,000,000) in 1948! The same study showed: 

26 CBS programs had a monthly audience of over 

10,000,000 people 
19 had a monthly audience of 20,000,000 
12 had a monthly audience of over 30,000,000 
5 had a monthly audience of over 40,000,000 

Turnover 
sells goods 

The "turnover" concept is extremely important to 
advertisers. Roper showed that most people listened 
two or more times to the same program in the month, 
and that even the people who listen less than every 
week buy more goods because of the program. 

Listeners wrote 70,000,000 
letters last year 

The people's attitude toward radio is expressed in 
the way in which they correspond with it. Last year 
more than 70,000,000 letters (exclusive of premium 
and direct mail orders) found their way to spon- 
sors, networks, and stations. One of them to a 
network came from a housewife in Michigan and sums 
up what radio means to America: 

"My radio is my teacher. I am an ordinary house- 
wife with five little pairs of hands tied to my 
apron strings, so plays, concerts, books and news- 
papers are not for me, but thanks to my radio, life 
is not too hum-drum. 

"While mending, dusting or washing dishes, com- 
mentators and book reviewers keep me posted, or 
talented announcers intrigue me with quiz ques- 
tions. I am constantly learning. Music, all kinds 
— and I have my choice. 

"Wonderful to enjoy all this with little effort. I 
sincerely believe that God has led man to develop 
radio to use as one of the most powerful forces in 
shaping his destiny." 



54 



SPONSOR 



WCAO has 



the biggest audience* of 



any radio or television 



station in Baltimore! 



* Hooper Station Audience Index for the City of Baltimore, 
November -December, 1949; Total Rated Time Periods. 



a 



The Voice of Baltimore" 



CBS BASIC • 5000 WATTS • 600 KC • REPRESENTED BY RAYMER 



30 JANUARY 1950 55 




Mr. Sponsor asks.. 




Mr. Pellegrin 



The 

Picked Panel 

answers 

Mr. A brains 

\ continuing 
-erie- (i! linii al 
studies of radiu s 
effectiveness for a 
variet) ol l\ pes 
of basic adver- 
tisers-food, drug, 
clothing, furni- 
^^■^^-' 

etc. . . . 

Industr) sup- 
port for the best 

modern radio te\ll k at the high 

school level, lo train the next genera- 
tion of advertising people . . . 

A revival of BMB or its equivalent, 
to provide standard, uniform research 
on all basic phases of radio rather than 
JUSl one side of the i tulllst I \ . . . 

An industr) drive to stop the chisel 
deal, the per-inquir) racket, destructive 
rate-cutting and internecine cut-throat 
competition among station- . . . 

\ solemn pact among all radio sta- 
tions, network-, reps and others to sell 
radio, and il the) feel a compelling 
urge to compete, to lake il oul on othei 
ad\ ei tising media . . . 

\ campaign i<> enlist the same super- 
lative cooperation from other retail 
trade associations as is now being 
given b) the NRDGA ... 

Permanent support on an annual 

basis, equal to thai given this past 

veai i" the Mi-Radio Presentation, for 

the industr) - mosl vital and energetic 

inization todaj the BAB ... 

A drive to enlist clos :i and pei ma 
neni participation of all others who 
live in whole 01 in pari olT the radio 



•In addition tu I I <. II I MM. THAT TALKS, what can 
bo floiio lo liolp .soil broadcasting as an effective 
ad vor Using moil in in?" 



George J. Abrams 



Advertising Manager of 

Block Drug Inc., Jersey City, N. J. 




Mr. McGill 



industr) — program producing com- 
panies, record manufacturers, music 
libraries, news services, set manufac- 
turers, and even the radio departments 
of advertising agencies . . . 

Peabody awards for the best com- 
mercials of the year . . . 

Frank K. Pellegrin 
/ i< e-Presidenl 
Transit Radio Inc. 
\ ew } ork 

LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS 
is an excellent 
springboard for 
radio — a won- 
derful opportu- 
nit\ for the in- 
iluslrs to increase 
its tempo. How- 
ever, to maintain 
its continuing 
progress, the ra- 
dio people and particularl) the local 
stations must make plans for a follow- 
up promotion. 

I have no doubt thai the Ul-Radio 
Presentation film will generate a favor- 
able state of mind for radio. Il is up 
lo the hundreds of stations all over the 
countr) to maintain this condition. 
I his ran onh be done b) a continuing 
-cries of promotions designed to -how 
businessmen, be the) radio advertisers 
"i non-advertisers, the benefits of ra- 
dio as a "selling" medium. 

In the Inline, when an salesman 
goes to sell he should have a plumed 
presentation read) to show to people 
who have seen the film. He musl -how 
how program and time can be har- 
nessed to the purticular advertiser's 
purpose. Radio is .1 versatile, power- 
ful and persuasive medium and the 
advertiser who doesn'l use radio musl 
be -how n w hat radio can 1 1< >. 




Mr. Hammond 



Radio can sell and il can serve. Il 
is ujj to the industr\ to prove it. 

\\ . B. Mc Gill 

Advertising & Sales Promotion )lu./. 
It estiiifilioiise Radio Stations 
Philadelphia 

The job to be 
done is to resell 
everyone on the 
gigantic power of 
radio as an ad- 
vertising medium 
and to sell it to 
those who have 
not been sold be- 
fore. LIGHT- 
NING THAT 
TALKS will help 
but it can't begin to do the job 
alone. It must be merchandised to 
all as a backdrop for individual 
presentations b\ networks, spot radio. 
individual stations, representatives, 
etc. Ol course, the storx of the film 
should be told in booklel form as 
planned . . . and given the widest circu- 
lation possible. In addition, the net- 
works musl continue to sell radio hard 
in collaboration with agencies and all 
other interested groups. BAB musl 
furnish a Constant How of success 
-lories. The Industr) generall) sta- 
tions and probabl) networks- must 
overhaul their thinking about point-of- 
sale merchandising ol radio programs 
because il is vital to the success ol a 
-how once it is on the air. I he pro- 
gram people musl also overhaul llieii 
ideas about program techniques to 
meet changing conditions and compe- 
tition. \nd. finally, the indusl 1 \ should 

concentrate on il< >< uinenlini; the sales 

effectiveness of radio. Ml factors 
-hould u:ei behind ihi- enormoush i 1 11 - 



% 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Weil 



portant project which probably should 
be coordinated by one group. 

Charles Hammond 

Vice-President 

NBC 

New York 

To sell broadcast- 
ing as an effec- 
tive advertising 
medium, we be- 
lieve the indi\ id- 
ual station must 
approach the 
p r ob le m i n a 
manner specifi- 
cally designed to 
assist both adver- 
tiser and agency 
in directing their advertising to known 
individuals rather than trying to reach 
the unknown mass audience. Stations 
must present authentic basic facts 
obtained in the field as to who lis- 
teners are, where they live and shop. 
what they earn, spend and buy, what 
they like and dislike and what they 
plan for tomorrow. Up-to-the-minute 
information on defined listener groups 
combined with merchandising assis- 
tance eliminates costly guesswork. 

By providing this extra service for 
advertisers and permitting them to 
purchase time based on established 
facts, we can help sell broadcasting as 
a more effective advertising medium. 
Ralph N. Weil 
President 

Radio Station WOV 
New York 

At the very incep- 
tion of the All- 
Radio Presenta- 
tion back in 1947, 
it was felt by the 
original group 
that the proposed 
film LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS 
should not be the 
only joint effort 
Mr. Kenway to b e undertaken. 

Having brought all elements of the 
radio industry together on an initial 
project, it seemed reasonable to sup- 
pose that some continuing acti\il\ 
would be in order. 

It is true that LIGHTNING THAT 
TALKS is more than a one-shot pro- 
motion. After initial showings across 
the country, city by city, under the 
sponsorship of local station groups 
there will be. I hope, intense activity as 
presentations are made b\ individual 

30 JANUARY 1950 




Watch the 
New WDSU 

Sponsors in New Orleans 
Have "Seen the Lightening! 



Over 60 leading local firms and more 
than 45 national advertisers "saw the 
light"- ning during the past year and 
became new WDSU sponsors. 

While pioneering TV in the Deep South, 
we are ever mindful of the continuing 
impact or radio and have greatly increas- 
ed our AM facilities; completely new and 
up-to-the-second radio studios will soon 
be in use. 

WDSU is building a greater future for 
both AM and TV in the South's Great- 
est Market! 



Ask Your JOHN BLAIR Man! 




EDGAR B STERN, JR 
Partner 



ROBERT D. SWEZEY 
General Manager 



LOUIS READ 
Commercial Manager 




57 



stations to individual prospects — a 
great main of whom I also hope will 
be concerns who have never used radio 
as an advertising medium. 

But after a certain period of time — 
perhaps six or eight months — will 
come the need for new and continuing 
promotion. I think it is not too early 
to start making our plans now for that 
period in the latter half of 1950. 

Ivor Kenwak 

/ icr- 1' 'resident 
lineriean Broadcasting Co. 
\ ew ) ork 



It may seem 
strange to take an 
objective look at 
the question of 
how to sell so 
well proven an 
advertising med- 
^A ' C- ium as radio at 

^ the game . . . it's 

almost like telling 
Mr. Barnes vr » n 

a [Notre Dame 

football team how advantageous it is 
to "go out there and win." But as foot- 
ball has progressed a long distance 




THE RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 
MARKET IS BETTER \ 
THAN EVER BEFORE! <d& 




According to the 

U. $. Department of Commerce, the national 

merchandiser will find a good market in this area. 

The diversification of industry is broader than might be 

imagined and payrolls ore prosperous.* 



WRNL saturates this steady, growing 3- 
QUARTER BILLION DOLLAR MARKET 
where EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME. RE- 
TAIL SALES, and POPULATION (the fig- 
ures you live by!) continue to grow at a rate 
which exceeds both state and nation! 

WRNL's 50-to-100% BMB coverage of this 
39 - county area means high - powered sales 
impact in 115,630 radio homes — and the fa- 
cilities of WRNL'a magnificent Radio Center, 
encompassing the very last word in technical 
equipment and construction, staffed with 
competent, trained personnel, give you the 
FINEST in quality of broadcast! 

*New Publication, "County Business Patterns/' by 
Office of Domestic Commerce. 





58 



from the "flying wedge days" so has 
radio advertising metamorphosed to 
what it is today, and it deserves a re- 
inspection by everyone in the industry. 
Radio advertising today must be 
sold in the strictest of business-like 
terms. With the wide-spread accept- 
ance of advertising and market-analy- 
sis techniques applied to this medium, 
the simple passage of time and the 
incursion of advertising's new glamour 
girl, television, radio has ceased being 
the darling of the well-heeled sponsor. 
This all reduces radio to a compara- 
tively even footing with the other me- 
dia. Well, where's broadcastings plus 
factor? It's in dealer and point-of-sale 
merchandising and promotion. 

Many times in the past year I have 
known of decisions in favor of radio 
and in favor of one station or network 
over another where it was not so much 
wattage, BMB studies, production fa- 
cilities and the like that clinched the 
deal; rather, it was the amount and 
kind of merchandising and promotion 
assists guaranteed by the station or 
network. This is the new dimension 
in radio advertising; coverage and 
program is no longer enough; more 
must be done to clinch sales. WLW. 
Cincinnati, was a pioneer in this plus 
service; a casual examination of their 
available time for sale is proof enough 
of how important this service becomes 
to advertisers. 

Recently, in behalf of our client, 
Helbros Watches, we contracted for the 
"Richard Diamond. Private Detective" 
program, starring Dick Powell, over 
NBC. Many fine program properties 
and good time segments, all at the 
right price, were offered to us. What 
decided us in favor of "Diamond" and 
NBC was the terrific merchandising 
and promotion campaign we were able 
to set-up through NBC and Powell. 
Not only will the network give a con- 
sistentlv heavy national push, but they, 
with us, are themselves going to pro- 
mote to the dealers and the consumer, 
as will each of their member stations 
on the local level. 

Of course, a watch is a product ad- 
mi rablv suited to this kind of treat- 
ment: but there is no advertisable 
product in existence, from corn flakes 
to Alsatian saddle-soap, that won't 
show a noticeable sales bump with this 
kind of coordinated advertising. 

Howard G. Barnes 

Vice President 
Radio & Television 
Dorland, Inc. 

SPONSOR 



MUTUAL 



WLEC 



1450 KC 



ONE OF THE GREATEST LITTLE STATIONS IN THE NATION! 



99.8 

RENEWALS! 




PROMOTION! 

POPULATION 
COVERAGE! 



PROGRAMING! 



MON THRU FRI. 


WLEC 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


8 TO 12 NOON 


41.6 


29.2 


15.9 


8.5 


0.8 


1.5 


12 TO 6 PM 


48.5 


25.3 


12.4 


6.1 


2.1 


1.6 


6 TO 8 PM 


35.9 


31.1 


11.9 


10.4 


3.0 


2.2 


8 TO 10 PM 


26.1 


38.2 


18.1 


6.8 


2.0 


2.0 



if WINTER 1949 HOOPER INDEX 

just ask EVERETT-McKINNEY and learn 

ONE OF THE GRANDEST VALUES IN 
RADIO ADVERTISING TODAY! 

30 JANUARY 1950 



59 



The 




four 




pages 



Late in 1946 sponsor hopefully published the 
first issue of a unique magazine devoted 1 (►()*' ( 
to helping advertisers and advertising agencies 
appreciate, evaluate, and effectively tise radio 
and television advertising. 

Every year since its inception sponsor has 
issued a report to its readers describing its 
state of health, its growth, what it has done, 
what it intends doing. When a magazine serves 
an industry we believe that its readers are en- 
titled to such information. 

Herewith are some facts of particular interest. 

As of the issue of 30 January. 19:50. sponsor 
had published 4.424 pages. Of these. 744 pages 
Xvere printed in the first year. 1494 pages in the 
second, 2186 pages since. 

About 53% of the total linage has been de- 
voted to editorial. 17' ', to advertising. 

sponsor started with a staff of eight. One year 
later it had twelve. Today it has twenty. 



for buuerd of radio and (elevLsion 



sponsor began its career as a monthly. When 
the need for more frequent publication became 
apparent it shitted to bi-weekly operation 
<every-other-Monday) , a schedule that it lias 
maintained since the beginning of 1949. 

Simultaneous with going bi-weekly, sponsor 
was granted second-class mailing privileges. In 
slightly over two years sponsor has succeeded 
in converting considerably more than 50% of 
its guaranteed 8,000 copies to paid circulation 
— at the highest subscription rate in its field. 

Today sponsor has more paid subscriptions 
among national advertisers and agency execu- 
tives than any other trade publication devoted 
to radio and television. It has more than twice 
the total advertiser and agency circulation of its 
nearest competitor. 

During the problem-rift year 1949 sponsor's 
opportunity to serve the broadcast advertising 
industry hit its lull stride. Before the Broad- 



cast Advertising Bureau became a reality spon 
sor editorialized time and again on the urgen< \ 
of an industry promotion-and-selling bureau. 
The Big Plus, Radio Is Getting Bigger, Let's 
Sell Optimism (adopted by hundreds of sta- 
tions and reprinted by the thousands) were 
created and published during 1949. sponsor 
aimed its "pictorialized facts-and-figures tech- 
nique" on timely subjects. In addition to its 
regular issues it produced, during the year, the 
Summer Selling Issue, Fall Facts Issue, NAB 
Evaluation Issue, 99 TV Restdts (three print- 
ings) , Farm Facts Handbook. 

These are some sponsor contributions, over 
and beyond its normal activity, to its readers. 

We believe that sponsor's growth is in pro- 
portion to its fulfillment of outstanding indus- 
try service. 

In this crucial year 1950 we believe that 
sponsor is on the road to greater achievement. 




510 Waclison ^Avenue, fjew IJorh 22 





NEW YORK 

WILL BEGIN OPERATION 

on 

5,000 WATTS POWER 

ON OR ABOUT FEBRUARY 15 



WWRL delivers its selling signal to 9,005,442 potential 
buyers in the rich, greater New York. 

WWRL covers America's Greatest Buying Market at the 
Lowest Cost. 

WWRL specializes in foreign languages and the Negro 
market. 



1600 

The HIGH Spot on the Dial' 



62 



PREMIERES 

I Continued from page 43) 

be widely publicized. 

Joint showings are scheduled in Ma- 
con and Columbus, Georgia, and in 
Cedar Rapids. Iowa. 

No audience will be left untapped 
by subscribers. Many stations are 
placing prints in libraries and univer- 
sities on the theory that the student of 
today is the advertiser of tomorrow. 

To insure safe and punctual delivery 
of the film to subscribers, BAB has 
hired Modern Talking Pictures; this 
outfit will work out distribution. 

BAB's Maurice Mitchell and his sec- 
retary. Virginia Rolls, got things roll- 
ing by telling MTP's executives about 
presentation dates of subscribers. 
MTP determined the number of prints 
to be placed with each of its 26 film 
exchanges; these are located in the 
major I . S. cities. In areas where 
the demand for prints was heavy, the 
exchange nearby received many films 
and vice versa. 

Subscribers who need both a print 
of the movie and a projector can get 
help from Modern. The firm has 160 
projectionists located in various 
parts of the country. The projection- 
ists will provide projector, screen, and 
print at the designated place and time. 
Mitchell has urged subscribers to make 
use of these sendees, cautioned them 
against hiring amateur projector op- 
erators. An interrupted showing due 
to some technical mishap can ruin an 
entire presentation. 

Subscribers who have their own 
projector and screen equipment, or- 
dered prints of the movie only. Prints 
are sent to subscribers from the near- 
est exchange. When subscribers con- 
clude their premieres they return the 
film to the exchange. There it is 
cleaned, inspected I see pictures) and 
then sent on to the next subscriber. 

The overall success of LIGHTNING 
THAI' TALKS, explains Maurice 
Mitchell, depends on the consideration 
and cooperation of all the subscribers. 
Late film returns mean cancelled pres- 
entation dates. 

Should a subscriber fail to return 
a film, or lose it. RAB has reserve 
prints available. LIGHTNING THAT 
I \l.kS i> the industry's most impor- 
tant selling tool to date. And every- 
thing possible is being done to make 
sure subscribers can use it on time 
and in the righl atmosphere. * * * 

SPONSOR 






WftDIB 



Chicago's BEST 
50,000 Watt BUY 



A MARSHALL FIELD STATION 
REPRESENTED 
NATIONALLY BY 
AVERY-KNODEL 



30 JANUARY 1950 



63 



* 5.000.000 



Lang-Worth Member Stations 
to Share in Rich Bonanza of 
Sponsors 9 Gold during I9SO 



A Nation-wide survey, just completed, conclu- 
sively proves that advertisers and agencies are 
supporting Lang-Worth's plan to increase local 
station income. This plan, initiated July 1947, 
was designed to promote a greater use of the 
Lang- Worth Library Service among advertisers 
and agencies — to facilitate the use of this service 
over Lang- Worth member stations and capture 
advertising money that heretofore was directed 
to local newspapers and other non-radio media. 

I«0% DOLLAR INCREASE 

According to signed reports from Lang-Worth 
station members, advertisers and their agencies 
spent $3,52 1,430 during the 12 months of 
1949 sponsoring Lang-Worth production pro- 
grams. This represents an increase of 160% 
over 1947, the year the plan was started, and 
66% increase over 1948. 

Reports from member stations and interviews 
with agencies all point to a still greater com- 
mercial use in 1950, making the estimate of 
$5,200,000 most conservative (see graph). 



r»7:i 



STATIONS I'Olllh 



The figures used in this statement are based 
upon signed reports received from 573 Lang- 
Worth stations (92% of the total). Every type of 
station was represented. From 50 KW's in 
major markets to 250-watt outlets in suburban 
areas. 55% were network, 45% independent. 

I feel it important to emphasize that this 
statement is restricted to income received solely 
from a special group of shows conceived and 



written by our program department and made 
available to advertisers and agencies for spon- 
sorship over Lang-Worth member stations. It 
does not include several million dollars of 
additional revenue from participating and disc 
jockey programs built from the Lang-Worth 
Library by the member stations, but not re- 
ported in this survey. 

The Lang-Worth shows included in station 
reports were: The Cavalcade of Music, Mike 
Mysteries, Through the Listening Glass, The 
Emile Cote Glee Club, Meet the Band, Riders 
of the Purple Sage, The Concert Hour, Blue 
Barron Presents, Keynotes by Carle, The 4 
Knights, Drifting on a Cloud, Salon Serenade, 
Airlane Melodies, Pipes of Melody, Time for 3 A 
Time and Your Community Chapel. 

WHY 95,000,000 FOR »50 

The normal trend of advertisers toward an 
accelerated use of Lang-Worth Service during 
the past 3 years (see graph), coupled with 
*■ inner-circle"" reports from advertising agen- 
cies and station representatives, more than 
justify the statement that "$5,000,000 for 50" 
is a modest estimate. 

However, Lang-Worth will not sit by com- 
placently and rest on yesterday's laurels. Rather, 
we are now geared to use these success records 
as the impetus for an even greater effort towards 
fulfilling tomorrow's prophecy. 

Lang-Worth Program Service will be still 
more attractive to advertisers in 1950. New and 
outstanding name talent is making our present 
production programs even more inviting to 



for '50 ! 



sponsors* gold. New IDEA programs, half-hour 
and 15 minutes across-the-board, with separate 
voice tracks and personalized announcements 
are in the works . . . plus an abundance of 
production aids and gimmicks which are made 
possible only through the amazing NEW Lang- 
Worth 8-inch Transcription. 

NEW 8-INCH TRANSCRIPTION 

Advertising agencies have a reputation to pro- 
tect and must exercise extreme caution when 
recommending a product for their client's use. 
The NEW Lang-Worth 8-inch Transcription has 
received the enthusiastic endorsement of every 
advertiser and agency who attended the special 
auditions held throughout the country. 

Beginning April 1, 1950, all Lang- Worth 
member stations will be equipped with full 
service of the NEW Lang -Worth 8 -inch Tran- 
scription. Not only is the product superior in 
tonal fidelity . . . not only is the signal to noise 
ratio greatly increased, but now, for the first 
time, agencies can guarantee to their clients 
brand-new, crystal-clear transcriptions. Now, 
for the first time, agencies may recommend 
with complete confidence a still broader use 
of the Lang- Worth Program Service. 

$5,000,000 for '50 is a pushover! Personally, 
I anticipate a 100% dollar increase in 1950 
over 1949. 




C. O. Longlois, President 



LANG-WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS, Inc. 

113 WEST 57th STREET, NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



MILLIONS 



$4 



*3 



J2 







1946 1947 194! 



I949 



1950' 



HELL NO! 

We Don't Make 
Preposterous Claims 

. . . but here are a couple 
NOBODY else can make: 

1. More people who dial 

1280 in 

ROCHESTER 

get WVET than any 
other station. 

2. We are the Number 1 

Mutual Station 
in the entire city of 

ROCHESTER 

P.S. We've got dozens of 
others, too. We'd 
like to tell you about 
them sometime. 



The Eager Beaver Station 
In Rochester 

WVET 

5,000 Power-Full 
WHATS! 



ME TOO 

{Continued from page 45) 

(see sponsor for 12 September, 1949) 
had not been made. WMT commercial 
manager Lewis Van Nostrand had no 
controlled experimental evidence to 
show ( as the Lazarsfeld study later 
did I that radio commercials have a 
decided edge over newspaper ads in 
their power to get attention, inspire re- 
membrance and liking, etc. But he did 
have plenty to say about the flexibility, 
frequency, and impact of radio as re- 
vealed by WMT success stories. 

Drake had never used radio. He 
wasn't convinced. 

But the Gazette suddenly found it- 
self reaching for a hot potato. The 
theory behind ME TOO was that no 
other food store could undersell Drake 
— he would say "me too" to any ad- 
vertised price. This was to be the 
theme of the small boxed-type ads with 
which he proposed to herald his open- 
ing. The Gazette, mindful of other 
food accounts, said "Not us." 

As a result the big supermarket 
opened almost cold. Five one-minute an- 
nouncements on WMT (cost then about 
$40) with about the equivalent amount 
of space in the Gazette comprised the 
pop-gun opening announcements. 

That was enough to bring people for 
a look at the new store, and for the 
next nine months Drake, with the as- 
sistance of Witwer, relied on smart 
merchandising and word-of-mouth ad- 
vertising to spread the word about ME 
TOO shopping advantages. 

In May, 1939, WMT convinced 
Drake that he could vastly strengthen 
ME TOO sales by a regular schedule. 
Drake decided to start with five 100- 
word announcements a week. 

The copy explained the store's name 
and sold an occasional special. From 
the very start the specials zoomed store 
traffic. Overall sales were always up on 
"special" days. In addition to making 
new customers, this was a basic aim of 
the "special" idea. 

Within a few weeks Drake had no 
more doubts lliat the impact and mem- 
or\ value of the spoken word could 
move housewives to his sales floor — 
literally in droves. He was ready to 
accept the stations next recommenda- 
tion when it came. 

The station believed that a ME TOO 
program to which housewives could 
listen at the same lime of day. week 
in and week out, would help establish 
the business as a personality. And it 
would cultivate regular listening. The 



vehicle chosen was "Crimson Trail," a 
transcribed cliflhanger produced by C. 
P. MacGregor. "Crimson Trail," fea- 
turing exploits of the Canadian "Moun- 
ties" was aired Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday, 5:30-5:45 in the afternoon, 
until the end of 1938. 

By this time Drake had thoroughlv 
tested his formula for the "radio spe- 
cial." It was an instrument destined to 
make ME TOO No. 1 perhaps the larg- 
est single grocery store operating be- 
tween Chicago and Denver. It built 
two additional supermarkets in Cedar 
Rapids and a third in nearby Marion. 
Iowa. It lifted Drake's five older stores 
from so-so operations to highly profit- 
able producers (their potential doesn't 
warrant expansion to supermarket 
status). 

ME TOO No. 1 now grosses over 
$1,000,000 a year and the three other 
supermarkets average close to that. 
Drake's Store in Blairstown (popula- 
tion 500), and the outlets in Marengo, 
Belle Plaine, South English, and Wil- 
liamsburg, Iowa, together gross about 
$1,000,000.. 

The secret of the daily radio special 
was, and is. to make certain that the 
radio bargain represents a genuine 
money-saving value. At the get-togeth- 
er of store managers in Drake's mod- 
est Blairstown office every Thursday, 
one of the questions thrashed out is 
the next group of specials. 

The items are chosen as much as two 
months in advance. Two weeks is 
about the least time in which a deal 
can be arranged. Individual store man- 
agers must have time to place their 
orders; radio copy prepared, etc. Sup- 
pliers in some instances need more 
than a few days' advance notice in or- 
der to make shipments. 

The late afternoon "Crimson Trail" 
made friends for the ME TOO chain 
and its associated stores. Its three-a- 
week messages made the daily specials 
the hottest groeerv merchandising gim- 
mick in the chain's trading area. But 
Drake decided, at the end of 1938, to 
step up the tempo of his advertising 
pressure to six days a week. It also 
made sense to spot his copy in the 
morning carls enough to catch the fam- 
ily marketers before the\ made up their 
lists for the day. 

WMT's morning schedule included 
two 45-minute musical clock type pro- 
grams running from 7:15 to 9:00. 
I hese pei iods included populai music, 
time signals, temperature and weather 
reports, etc.. and were conducted by 
I Please turn lt> page (><"» I 



66 



SPONSOR 




There is one important conclusion that we at WING 
would like to draw from our 25th anniversary 
which we celebrate this year. We have 
continued operating for a quarter century 
because we have continued to bring a solid 
value to our community and to our 
advertisers. 

This year, as in years past, we offer quality 
programming, quality merchandising assistance, 
and excellent coverage of the valuable Dayton, 
Ohio market. 




WEED 4 CO.— NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



10*10 . . . Our 2*ith Anniversary Yvur 

Miiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

30 JANUARY 1950 67 




utilizing WGY 10 years ago 

are using WGY today 

...reason? 



Represented Nationally by NBC Spot Sales 

D#i B TELEVISION 

CHANNEL 4 

Serving Eat torn New York, Western New 
England, Albany, Troy and Schenectady 




A CENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 



ME TOO 

[Continued from page 66 I 

WMT's ace morning m.c. Howd) 
Roberts. The periods are sold in 15- 
minute segments. ME TOO became 
sponsor of the 8:30-8:45 quarter-hour, 
beginning in 1939. 

A daily deal often sells from a mini- 
mum of a thousand up to five thousand 
units. It isn't unusual, however, for a 
popular deal to sell main more. 

For example, last May an offer of 
three bars of soap for a dime resulted 
in 8,400 sales. Last November a Jell-0 
special at a nickel a package brought 
5.700 sales. Sometimes a special pur- 
chase will enable Drake to run a hot 
radio special and come out very well 
financially at the days end. 

It is an absolutely unbreakable rule, 
however, to make no attempt to dilute 
the established value and acceptance of 
the ME TOO radio specials by slipping 
an occasional fast one over on the buy- 
er. This is perhaps the greatest single 
factor in the unbroken success of the 
gimmick over the years. 

A novice would probabh call the 
radio copy written in Blairstown by 
Drakes assistant, George Haloupek. 
"unprofessional." But Haloupek knows 
his listeners. His \erv direct copy is 
the kind often labeled "straight from 
the shoulder." The selling is hard, but 
the cop) is direct talk about things 
housewives are vitally interested in: de- 
tails on [nice and qualit) : information 
on whj the ME TOO and affiliated 
stores are good places to shop. 

The station has the privilege of edit- 
ing the copy, but as a matter of prac- 
tice they don t. Roberts, an announcer 
with the "common-touch." often ad 
libs around the commercial. The pro- 
gram is also used to push some ME 
TOO label products, such as flour, cof- 
fee, and salad dressing. Sometimes a 
contest, or other promotional gimmick, 
is used in 1 1 1 i > connection. The meat 
and fresh vegetable departments are 
frequentlj pushed. Bui never at the 
expense of the radio special. 

All stores display the radio special 
each dav and use carnival type posters 
to tie in with the \\ \1T program. \t 
present the Cedar Rapids Gazette lia> a 
contract l<n about live or six inches a 
week through the \ ear. 

This space is used in various ways: 
institutional plugs; the radio special; 
other ilems. In mo>i instances the small 
ads feature one good item each day. 
following a \\ Ml recommendation 
i Plea v c //// n in page * ' • i 



68 



SPONSOR 



A STATEMENT FROM 




1 

LI 



We believe that a radio station has a duty to its advertisers 
and to its listeners. We believe that, every once in a while, it 
is a radio station's duty to restate its principles, to review its 
purpose for being, and to advise its advertisers and listeners 
of the company they are keeping. 

At WGAR, our actions are governed by certain beliefs that 
we feel are important for the good of listeners and for the 
benefit of our clients. 



1. We have one rate card. All WGAR adver- 
tisers pay the same amount of money for similar 
services. And we do not accept P. I. advertising. 

2. W> believe that anv attempt to buy listening 
by offering prizes as a reward is a deception not 
in the public interest. Our high listenership is 
created and maintained through the exceptional 
entertainment and informational value of 
our programs. 

3. Every day, Cleveland's Friendly Station is 
invited into hundreds of thousands of homes in 
Northeastern Ohio. Therefore we strive to act as 
a becoming guest. No advertising matter, pro- 
grams or announcements are accepted which 
would be offensive, deceptive or injurious to the 
interests of the public. 

4. We believe in fairness to responsible people 
of all convictions. Those of different religious 
faiths broadcast freely . . . and free . . . over our 



facilities. Balanced controversies are aired reg- 
ularly without charge. We practice freedom of 
expression withoul penalty to those whose 
opinions differ from our own. 

5. We believe that we serve our advertisers 
more effectively by broadcasting no more than 
a single announcement between programs. 



These are but a few of the principles b\ which 
WGAR lives. For more complete information, 
write for a printed copy of WGAISV code of 
operating rules and advertising standards. It is a 
guide that results in listener belief in us . . . and 
helps us to best serve them and our advertisers. 

And there are more of both . . . listeners and 
advertisers . . . than ever before. In 19 years, we 
have grown from 500 watts to 50,000 watts. Our 
business in 1949 set an all-time record. 

II you are not advertising on WGAR. we in- 
vite you into the good company of those who are. 



50,000 WATTS TO CLEVELAND 



Represented Nationally by 




Edward Petry & Co. 



Radio — America's Greatest Advertising Medium 




1 

LI 



30 JANUARY 1950 



69 



ME TOO 

(Continued from page 681 

<>\rr ten years ago that b\ featuring 
one hot item day in. day out. week in, 
week, out, month in. month out. even- 
tually the personality of their opera- 
tion would get acro>-.. 

An aeeident sometimes shows up the 
flexibility and instantaneous impact of 
radio with startling effect. In 1948 
three carloads of fresh Colorado 
peaches were held up several days en 
route to Cedar Rapids. The fruit ar- 
rived so ripe that the juice spurted 
when Drake hit into it. It had to he 
sold in one dav. 



What to do? 

Drake decided to jerk the canned 
beans (canned goods comprise most of 
the specials) and substitute the peaches 
as the morrow's special. The live scene 
actualK developed as suggested at the 
beginning of this story. By noon there 
wasn't a peach left in am of the Drake 
stores, \nnouncements on a single pro- 
gram accounted for this phenomenon. 

And how did Ben Cradus and his 
IMPS camera happen to be on hand in 
Cedar Rapids in 1948 to film that 
scene in front of No. 1? He wasn't. 

But hold on. 

It really happened as pictured in 
the film: and Cradus was there to film 



THE SOUTH BEND MARKET MUST 
BE COVERED ...AND ONLY 



WSBT COVERS IT! 



WSBT completely covers this market — and what 
a market! Its heart is South Bend and 
Mishawaka, two adjoining cities with a com- 
bined population of 157,000. The total 
population of the South Bend market is over 
half-a-million, while 1948 retail sales 
totaled more than xaM-^-billion dollars! 

In addition to its complete coverage of the 
South Bend market, WSBT's primary area 
includes another million people who spent 911 
million dollars in retail purchases in 1948! 

The South Bend market is one of America's 
biggest and best. It must be covered! It 
is covered by one station — and only one. 
No other station, Chicago or elsewhere, 
even comes close. 





WSBT duplicates its tntin 
schedule on WSBT-FM ,// 
no extra cost to advertisers. 



5000 WATTS • 960 KC • CBS 
PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

70 



it. The answer? Gradus went to Bill 
Drake in 1949. They put their heads 
together over the question of filming 
an authentic response to a radio spe- 
cial. "Why not make peaches the item 
again? asked Cradus. 

Again three carloads of peaches were 
disposed of b\ noon, after being fea- 
tured just once (the morning of the 
sale l on the ME TOO musical clock. 
The camera caught not a staged scene, 
hut the action just as people flocked to 
MK TOO after the special was aired. 

The Drake chain is operated from 
the same small back-store office with 
hand-crank telephone that he occupied 
before radio built him into a big-time 
groceryman. 

Trusted lieutenant;- manage the in- 
dividual units. Their counsel in the 
regular Thursday morning meetings is 
no mere formality. Weavers long ex- 
perience as a successful wholesaler is 
given due weight in these counsels, hut 
Drake is boss. 

Drake's philosophy of marketing 
food is basically simple: buying and 
selling at the right prices — plus smart 
radio. He spent about S3.000 on total 
advertising eleven years ago. In 1949 
his bill for broadcasting was about 
$6,500. Smart advertiser? • • * 



To Corer the 
Greater Wheeling 
(W.Va.) Metropolitan 
Market Thoroughly 
YOU NEED 

WTRF 



AM-FM 



Proof . . . 

Consult the Hooper Area Coverage 
Index, 3-County Area 1949, and see 
how well WTRF covers the Wheeling 
Metropolitan Market of Northern 
West Virginia and Eastern Ohio. 

Studios and Transmitter: 
WOODMONT, BELLAIRE, OHIO 

Represented by 

THE WALKER CO. 



SPONSOR 




"HOME STATION" iatfoVjfaHtawL 



7 • 
7 



For more than half the 
total radio homes in 
Michigan. 



For the most loyal 
listeners in Detroit. 



For the lowest rate per 
1,000 listeners in Metro- 
politan Detroit area. 




Phone Jordan 

46523 

Royal Oak, Michigan 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY FRIEDENB AC Y, INC. 



F-M^, 104.3 M.C 



NBC... America's No.l 



^K In the long run, it's results that count . . . solid, 

measurable results that have linked these 

national advertisers to NBC year after year, together 

with dozens of other leaders now building up 

similar long runs . . . obvious effectiveness that in 

1949 won 24 new network sponsorships 

for NBC . . . busiest network in America. 

The National Broadcasting Company 

A service of Radio Corporation of Am erica 





on NBC for more than 20 years: 
The American Tobacco Company 
Bristol-Myers Company 
Cities Service Company 
General Foods Corporation 
General Mills, Incorporated 
Standard Oil Company of California 



National Dairy Products Corporation 
The Procter & Gamble Company 
Radio Corporation of America 
Sterling Drug, Incorporated 
Sun Oil Company 

on NBC for more tlian 10 years: 
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation 



Advertising Medium 



on NBC for more than 15 years: 
American Home Products Corporation 
B. T. Babbitt, Incorporated 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Company 



Campana Sales Company 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Inc. 

Lever Brothers Company 

Lewis-Howe Company 



The Firestone Tire and Rubber Company Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company 



S. C. Johnson & Son, Incorporated 
Miles Laboratories, Incorporated 
Philip Morris & Company, Ltd., Inc. 



Manhattan Soap Company 
The Pure Oil Company 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 
Skelly Oil Company 




yjheatre Guild on the Air 

During ( he past season, Theatre ('mild on the Air reached a new peak in listener- 
ship. This is particularly gratifying to all who have participated in attaining 
this goal. 

For our part, we'd like to take time out to say "Thanks" to the outstand- 
ing stars of stage and screen and all others who have helped us present full- 
hour programs of top-flight entertainment to our many new and old friends 
across the nation. 

We plan to continue to present radio drama at its best — over the 164 
coast-to-coast stations of the NBC network. 



UNITED STATES STEEL HOUR 




74 



SPONSOR 



PRUDENTIAL 

I Continued from page 53) 

In addition to hundreds of case his- 
tories like these. I'm has other direct 
evidence on which to hase faith in its 
radio approach. Several years ago the 
company did a coast-to-coast survey, 
asking 2.000 families to name the ra- 
dio program they regarded as most 
educational. The "Prudential Family 
Hour." which was basically entertain- 
ment, had made such a good impres- 
sion that it came out second. Obvi- 
ously, by convincing listeners that 
\oiir program is worthwhile, you go 
a long way toward impressing them 
with the company's quality. 

A more recent and more extensive 
survev by Prudential asked radio lis- 



teners which of the insurance <<>m- 
panies had radio programs. Far more 
people knew about the two Prudential 
programs than about the various pro- 
mams of competitors. 

In terms of sales radio has obvi- 
ously paid of! as well. During recent 
vears Pru - sales have mounted stead- 
il\. and the company is pulling ahead 
of Metropolitan in some insurance cate- 
gories. Met, until the time Pru went 
into radio strongly, had led in sales 
for most tvpes of insurance. 

Prudential has been making fast 
friends over the radio ever since 1939 
when it went on the air as the first 
sponsor of "When a Girl Marries." 
Pru kept the soap opera for tw r o years, 
then dropped it when it had already 
built up a vast audience. 



Why ? 

Simpl) because a soap opera, even 
if it has tears, and troubles, and sex 
appeal, hasn't go! what it takes to put 
the right aura around the Prudential 
Insurance Company. For. as Benton 
& Bowles vice-president Michael Car- 
lock put it recently, "The whole pn>- 
gram is the commercial." 

Benton & Bowles, as Pru's agency. 
got the company into radio with 
"When a Girl Marries" as a starter, 
then suggested a shift in course toward 
a program with subtler, richer over- 
tones: the "Prudential Family Hour." 
I "When a Girl Marries" soon found 
another sponsor, went on to become 
one of radio's most successful soap 
operas.) 

"The Familv Hour" starred Deems 



W-I-N-D 

3d in CHICAGO 

IN TOTAL AUDIENCE 



24.7! 



15.8% 



io.o% 



9.8% 



8.7% 



S.6% 



4.7% 



JULY THRU DEC, 1949 

6 AM-MIDNIGHT 

7 DAYS A WEEK 



LEADING 2 NETWORKS 

AND ALL OTHER 

INDEPENDENTS 



2.3% 



IET 


NET 


WIND 


NET 


NET 


INDEP 


INDEP 


INDEP 


A 


B 




C 


D 


2 


3 


4 



SOURCE: PULSE OF CHICAGO 



*THIRD IN TOTAL AU D I E N C E - F I R ST IN AUDIENCE PER DOLLAR 

WIND -CHICAGO • 24 HOURS A DAY • KATZ AGENCY, INC, REPRESENTATIVE 
30 JANUARY 1950 75 



Taylor and Gladys Swarthout. Il was 
a Sunda) afternoon show (CBS, 5:30) 
featuring ballads and light opera- mu- 
sic for middlebrows. < It- Hooper was 
only middling, too. Il hovered be- 
tween (> and 8 for years. I In the course 
of years the program's stars changed 
bul its format remained the same. 

Then, in the fall of last year, Pru 
made a big switch. Drama replaced 
the middlebrow music. Reasons: 



1. Listening was falling off; com- 
peition on that time spot had stiffened 
since 1911 with appearance of other 
big Sunda) programs; 

2. There seemed to he a trend in 
popular appeal toward dramatic -lu .w ~. 

In making the change Pru didn't 
throw it- ad\eiti-ing principles oxer- 
hoard. The new program, called the 
"Famil) Hour of Stars,' staved on a 
high entertainment level, kept the same 



%% 



Whoopee/ we're coin' to 

^WDAY'S PARTY. 1 " 




When WDAY lakes its Talent 
Parade "on the road," farmers and 
their wives for miles around turn 
out in a gay party mood. To quote 
a recent radio magazine article: 

"WDAY has promoted its 
weekly 30-minute Talent Pa- 
rade until il is a regional phe- 
nomenon. . . . For many (peo- 
ple) il is tin- first live enter- 
tainment the) have ever seen. 
. . . For others, it is the I » i li 
social event of the season." 

WDAY'e amazing popularity among 
the Ke«l River Valley's "landed gen- 
try" is one of the wonders of radio. 
Rut there'- a lol more to the story: 
\\l>\^ also gels the highest rily 
Hooper 8 in the nation! What's 
more, both "audiences" have aver- 
age Effective Buying Incomes "way 
above the national average! 

Write to us or ask Free iK Peters 

lor all the lac- about this fabulous 
station ! 



FARGO, N. D. 

NBC - 970 KILOCYCLES 
5000 WATTS 



3* 



r-*St>- 




hiikhmsM 



■ NaiUnat ftiprrtmu 



tin ■ and network. Il presents adapta- 
tions of good plays like "Elizabeth the 
Queen." "\Iar\ of Scotland.' and 
""\\ interset," or of good books, like 
"The Great Gatsln ." It doesn't go in 
for radio reproduction of Cecil B. De- 
Miile epics or other such flimsj Holly- 
wood fare. 

So far. Hooper ratings of the show 
have not been high. But the) are run- 
ning 19 percent over the last ratings 
of the mu-i al program. And it - hoped 
that they'll run higher still as word 
about the program slowly gets around. 

Those last three words, incidentally, 
are significant ones in Pru advertising. 
Pru commercials don't hit \ oil where 
you breathe. Thev don't make you 
run to your nearest insurance agent. 
But slowly the\ help the word xel 
around about Prudential and attempt 
to build trust in the company and its 
thousands of agents all over the U. S. 

Prudential has three basic commer- 
cial approaches: 

1. It explains the \ariet\ of means 
b\ which insurance can provide for a 
family's security, describes the main 
different types of Pru policies and spe- 
cialized rider.-: 

2. It explains the valuable benefits 
provided for in \arioiis contracts 
urging present Pru policy holders not 
to overlook them. 

3. It builds confidence in Pru 
agents b\ explaining that they're hand 
picked, highly trained. 

Lately, the company has also started 
to take listeners behind the scenes, ex- 
plaining how Prudential works. The) 
are told that present rate- for in- 
surance would be impossible without 
Prudential's business investments. 
The) hear human interest stories about 
small businessmen who were granted 
long-term loan- b) Pru. Or how Pru 
take- polic) holders" mone\ and uses 

it to vitalize the American economy, 
Lending it out to small home builders 
and companies clearing swamps for 
land development. B) emphasizing 
thai it- mone) gets oul to help small 
businessmen, Pru helps build the im- 
pression thai il i- a kindl) . warm corn- 
pan) rather than a distant institution. 
Since I'M I Pru has balanced its 
Sunda) afternoon program with a five- 
a-week, 15 - minute morning show 
I NBC, I 1 :30). This -how feature- Jack 
Berch, a whimsical and incredibl) 
corn) though likable singer and crack- 
er-barrel philosopher. Berch. whose 
voice, even when he's -peaking, prac- 
i Please turn i<> page 711 1 



76 



SPONSOR 



HOOPER proves WHIO AM-TV 

FIRST in the 

DAYTON, OHIO MARKET 



CIDCT in AM On the average, when sets are tuned to Dayton AM Stations, 3 

are tuned to WHIO for every 2 tuned to all other Dayton stations. 



Time 


Homes 
Using 
Sets 


WHIO 


Station 


WHIO 


Stations 
B & C 


B 


c 


Total Rated 
Time Periods 


24.3 


31.1 


12.7 


8.5 


31.1 


21.2 



Hooper Station Audience Index October-November, 1949 



WHIO-TV has a bigger share of the TV audience than any other 
FIRST if! TV TV station in the Dayton, O., market (32,000 TV sets in this market 
according to distributor's estimates, January 1, 1950. By the time 
you read this, there should be considerably more). 



Night 


B'cast 
Aud. 


Radio 
Aud. 


TV 
Aud. 


Share of TV Audience 
(Base: TV Homes) 


Share of Broadcast Audience 
(Base: Random Homes) 


WHIO-TV 


Sta. B 


WHIO-TV 


TV Station B 


Average 
Sun. thru Sat. 


35.7 


28.6 


7.1 


50.2 


39.2 


10.0 


7.8 



Hooper TV Station Audience Index Evening 6:00-10:00 PM October-November, 1949 



For maximum results at minimum cost — for sustained listener loyalty — for faster 
sales and increased profits, join those in the know— buy WHIO-AM and TV. 



THOSE IN THE KNOW BUY 



Affiliated with 
The Dayton Daily News 
and the Journal-Herald 




WHIO-AM Represented nationally by G. P. Hollingbery Compan 
WHIO-TV Represented nationally by the Kati Agency, Ini 






A new advertiser, without previous 
radio experience, bought a participation 
on WIP's "Dawn Patrol" (1:00 A.M. to 
6:30 A.M.) . . . and six weeks later he 
wrote his agency . . . 

"Our service department has picked 
up considerably and last week we sold 
four of the five cars we advertised ... we 
would like you to examine the possibility 
of ADDITIONAL RADIO TIME." 

Yes, WIP is . . . LIGHTNING THAT 
TALKS— profit! 



WIP 

Philadelphia 
Basic Mutual 

Represented Nationally 



ll>\V YICI> PETIIY & CO 




PRUDENTIAL 

{Continued from page 70 1 

tically begs for guitar accompaniment, 
complements the "Family Hour of 
Stars" perfectly. He takes care of the 
lower brows for Pru. was put on the 
air with the special aim of reaching 
the thousands of "industrial" insur- 
ance buyers in the country I industrial 
insurance is the kind with weekly pre- 
miums payable in amounts as small as 
a dime) . 

The Berch show has a Hooper of 
between 4 and 5. Add this to the ap- 
proximately 6 of the "Family Hour of 
Stars" and you still have what seems 
a relatively small audience. But, a 
Nielsen combination study shows that 
over a period of eight weeks, taking 
every other week, the total audience 
reached by the two shows added up to 
53.2 percent of all radio homes in the 
entire countn . 

That ain't hay. 

In fact, it's a sign the two shows are 
far more effective working together 
than a quick look at their raw ratings 
individually would indicate. The two 
programs show an audience duplica- 
tion of only 15 percent over the four 
alternate weeks referred to above, 
which helps account for the high total 
audience. And a high total audience 
over a period of weeks is more impor- 
tant for I'm than for a soap company, 
which has to drive its selling message 
home often and steadily. Pru wants 
to deepen an impression, can do so by 
reaching its audience from time to 
time I at intervals of several weeks). 

Pru's radio investment is relatively 
low in cost. Benton & Bowles has run 
several surveys to determine the rela- 
tive standing of Pru s slums cost-wise. 
()l seven nun serial morning shows, 
the Jack Berch program cost per 1,000 
Listeners was lowest. Among ten "in- 
stitutional" programs, the "Family 
Hour" was second lowest in cost per 
1.000 listeners, ahead of the "Tele- 
phone Hour," "Theatre Guild," and 
"Cavalcade of America" (the -bows 
selected for comparison arc those for 
which figures could be obtained). 

Sponsor Identification figure- for 

the Pru shows are also good. \ Hoop- 
er siirvcv found that among the five 
insurance company programs Jack 
Berch was first and the "lainilv Hour" 
second in sponsor identification. 

In proportion to the number of lis- 

(Please turn to page 80) 



78 



SPONSOR 




If you 

SELL 
GROCERIES 

...here's dramatic news about a 

CONTINUOUS PROMOTION of KFI advertised GROCERY PRODUCTS 
by SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA'S ^eadU? FOOD RETAILERS 

Los Angeles is the nation's second largest 
market for grocery products. Now, 50,000- 
watt KFI makes Los Angeles an even more 
fabulous market for its advertisers through 
the most dramatic tie-up in the history of 
Western food merchandising. 



^^ 



>\£ 



WHAT IS IT? 

KFI and leading 
i food retailers are 
r*jl^jȣ/ cooperating in a 
>/?£~_/ continuing pro- 
gram of KFI Val- 
ue Weeks. During each of these 
weeks one of these food chains 
will promote KFI -advertised 
products by pricing and mass 
displaying, by hefty point - of - 
purchase and newspaper support, 
by special sales meetings for 
supervisors and managers, and 
by a number of other individual 
selling devices. Each KFI Value 
Week will be heavily promoted 
on the air for the entire seven- 
day period. 




WHO BENEFITS? 

Everyone . . . the 
stores, KFI, and — 
most of all — KFI 
advertisers who 
will be assured 
continuous, powerful assistance 
throughout 1950. The stores will 
be stimulating the sales of all of 
KFI's local and national spot 
advertisers whose products they 
sell. This includes cleansers, 
tobacco products, and most con- 
fectionery items as well as foods. 



WANT MORE INFORMATION? 

We will be delighted to give you 
more of the details, copies of the 
point-of-purchase material, dates 
of the various KFI Value Weeks 
in specific stores. Just ask us by 
letter, wire, or in person. 





WHO IS PARTICIPATING? 

Already eight of the nation's larg- 
est grocery merchandisers are 
cooperating with KFI. Included 
are multiple store operators like 
Alpha Beta, Mayfair, Market 
Basket, Von's — known all over the 
country for their shrewd and pow- 
erful merchandising of groceries. 



WHAT'S THE COST? 

Not an extra cent for KFI gro- 
cery advertisers. This is a bonus 
for them— an effort on the part of 
KFI to make certain that there is 
a ring- up at the grocers' check- 
stands every time a KFI 
sales message enters a Southern 
California home. 




£a\fiflX .V44flfovu£j Dkc- 

50,000 waits • 640 kilocycles 

The los Angeles Station of NBC 

Represented nationally by 

Edward Petry and Company 



30 JANUARY 1950 



79 



PRUDENTIAL 

(Continued from page 7<!i 

teners. the Jack Berch show gets a 
good mail response. Recently Berch 

told his audience about a sick young- 
ster, urged that the) write him encour- 
aging in. --.iu( -. The child received 
thousands of letters and made the front 
page of the New York Daily News la 
paper which knows a good bandwagon 
when it sees ones I . 

Taking advantage of Berch's abilitv 
to pull letters. Pru frequently makes 



air offers on his program. Ibis past 
Christmas the company offered a book- 
let containing the words to Christmas 
carols. Some 45.000 listeners wrote 
for it within one week. From time to 
time Berch also plugs Pru's health 
booklets. Berch and the Family Hour 
together received a quarter million 
pieces of mail during 1949. 

While the "Family Hour" is aired 
on Sunday to make sure that it reaches 
a high percentage of men who are at 
home, Berch's show has a workaday 
function. It catches the housewife at 



On the air in Scranton, Pa.— April 1 



WQAN 



operating in conjunction with WQAN-FM 



630 kc. 



John P. McGoldricIc 
General Mgr. 



Frank S. Blair 
Commercial Mgr. 



owned and operated by the £&trtUltOtVt£itn££i 



her chores 11:30 even morning just 
when many agents are making calls. 
In LIGHTNING THAT TALKS a 
Cedar Rapids. Iowa, agent is shown 
gaining entry to a home where he's 
unknown 1>\ mentioning the Jack 
Berch show to a housewife. Many 
agents use this technique, though Pru- 
dential has no special sales strategy 
built around the show, i Equitable 
Life, on the other hand, provides 
agents with letters referring to their 
show which they mail out to clients 
prior to a call. Equitable in recent 
years has claimed that ten percent of 
its annual business is attributable di- 
rectly to its show and this procedure.) 

Pru has its own smooth method of 
using Berch for actual sales leads. 
When a housewife writes in for a 
health booklet, it's a district agent who 
delivers it to her and not Uncle Sam's 
mail man. On occasion Berch himself 
goes out on the rounds with agents, 
shakes hands with Pru policy holders 
in their own homes. After each such 
visit. Berch sends an autographed pic- 
ture of himself. 

Leads Berch produces often end up 
as sales. Just how many each year? 
Pru officials wish they knew but agents 
are bus) people, don't have the in- 
stincts of census takers. They rarelv 
write memos explaining how a sale 
came about. 

But apparently Prudential, under its 
advertising-wise president Carroll M. 
Shanks, thinks radio does an effective 
sales and name-building job. Pru- 
dential spent about $1,800,000 on 
broadcasting in 1949 ($1,000,000 for 
Berch, the rest for the Family Hour I. 
This is a good deal more than it spends 
on newspaper and magazine advertis- 
ing combined. 

In the years since Prudential began 
to stress radio advertising its sales have 
been going up constantly, breaking 
past records. \nd in the year just past 
sales reached an all-time high (9 per- 
cent above 1948). This fact more 
than any other is the clincher for Pru- 
dential in its judgment of radios effec- 
tiveness. The) figured it would open 
doois and it has. * * * 

J 'ust as sponsor went to press there 
was a rumor that I'm mi^lii <lr<>i> the 
"Family Hour of Stars." Indications 
are this move would be followed l>\ in- 
ception of another program with simi- 
lar thinking behind it: Pru's basic 
radio philosophy remains unchanged. 



80 



SPONSOR 




ivtic 

DOMINATES 

THE PROSPEROUS \ 
S0UMBRH NEW tUCVKftfe 

MARKET 

/ 




Paul W. Morency, Vice-Pres.— Gen. Mgr. Walter Johnson, A$*». Gen. Mgr. — Sales Mgr. 

WTIC's 50,000 WATTS REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY WEED 4 CO. 



30 JANUARY 1950 



81 



RADIO BREAKS ITS SILENCE 

{Continued from page 39) 

appointed a subcommittee charged 
with this mission: to give radio long- 
overdue means for selling itself. 

The subcommittee consisted of Gor- 
don Gray of WIP as chairman; Frank 
Pellegrin of Transit Radio Inc. (then 
head of the Department of Broadcast 
Advertising of NAB) ; and Thomas 
himself. 

Gray's committee started work in 
December, 1947 and learned about the 
network project. A merger followed — 



probably the most important promo- 
tion development in the history of 
broadcasting. The argument that con- 
vinced the networks, and it wasn't 
hard to do since they were receptive 
from the first, was this: "We told 
them," in the words of Gordon Gray, 
"that if we sold radio well from the 
grass roots up, we'd be doing the job 
for everybody, for networks as well as 
small independent stations. If the lo- 
cal tire distributor, groceryman, drug- 
gist, and department store manager is 
sold on radio, that's all you need to 
keep the ball rolling for everybody." 



the Long Island story 



CONLAN RADIO REPORT 

S U M M A R Y 



BASIC CALLS 



LISTENING HOMES 



% OF POTENTIAL AUDIENCE 



Morning 
Periodt 



2.519 



477 



18.9% 



Afternoon 
Periods 



2,802 



528 



18.8% 



Entire 
Survey 



5.321 



1.005 



18.9% 



DISTRIBUTION OF LISTENING HOMES AMONG STATIONS: 

"A" NETWORK 50,000 W. 26.4% 25.6% 



WHLI 



B" NETWORK 50,000 W. 



"C" NETWORK 50,000 W. 



D" NETWORK 50,000 W. 



OTHERS-FM-TV 



24.1 



11.3 



17.2 



9 7 



11.3 



24.6 



8.3 



19.5 



11.8 



10.2 



26.0% 



24.4 



9.8 



18.4 



10.7 



10.7 



Survey Peiiodi Sunday through Saturday — 8 00 A.M. to 4.30 P.M. Hempileod, Ne« York. 



.. THE vOICEOFJ£NGISLAND 



1100 oB y° ur dial 

WHLI-FM 98.3 MC 

HEMPSTEAD, LONG ISLAND, N.Y. 



Following this merger, the entire 
radio industry was ready to start sell- 
ing itself, after many years of silence. 

Just why was this vital step taken in 
1947 and not in 1940 or 1937? What 
finally made radio's far-flung and oft- 
en antagonistic elements finally get to- 
gether? The answer isn't simple. But 
basically, the All-Radio Presentation 
has come along as a natural outgrowth 
of the industry's maturity. 

For a quarter of a century, from 
1920 on, radio grew like Topsv. The 
attention of station managers was fo- 
cussed on FCC regulations rather than 
on sales; they spent far more time 
in Washington than they did in New 
York and Chicago, where new business 
came from. Despite this, their stations 
prospered. Sales came almost spon- 
taneously. Industrywide promotion 
could wait for tomorrow. 

But after the war the FCC adopted 
an expansion policy, licensed hundreds 
of new stations quickly. For estab- 
lished stations all over the country that 
meant a smaller cut of the pie and a 
decline in profits; the industry's peri- 
od of painless growth was over. It 
wasn't surprising, therefore, that by 
1947 there was strong feeling for an 




WINSTON-SALEM, N.C 

Is the Leading 

Industrial City 

in the South 

National Rep: The Walker Co. 




NORTH CAROLINA 



82 



SPONSOR 




REPORTER • SUPER SALESWOMAN • AUTHOR 

uiautei 

"The First Lady of Radio" 




In addition to her NEW YORK broadcast ... NOW BRINGS THIS 
NATIONALLY KNOWN PROGRAM TO THE MIDDLEWEST ON 



WGN 



9:15-10:15 A.M. 

MONDAY 
thru FRIDAY 



Now, your products can be sold by Mary Margaret McBride in the great WGN 
listening area. Her 15 years in radio have been years of radio's most successful 
selling . . . See what her sponsors say: 

• "In my entire twenty years' experience as president of an 
advertising agency, I know of no sponsored program 
that can accomplish such phenomenal results." Agency 

• "Nothing we have done has produced such widespread and 
favorable general comment on the part of both consumers 
and dealers, as our association with you." Sponsor 

• "Since you started broadcasting, our sales have pretty nearly 
doubled. Our increase one year was better than 65%." — Advertiser 

IN OTHER WORDS: IT'S RADIO'S MOST FABULOUS PROGRAM! 

Participations in the program are limited 
Call your WGN representative for complete details today 



A Clear Channel Station . . . 
Serving the Middle West 



0*5 



WM 



Chicago 11 
Illinois 

50.000 Walts 

720 
On Your Dial 



fffilflTTJ 



Eastern Sales Office: 220 East 42ml Street, New York 17. N V. 

West Const Representatives: Keenan and Elckelbertij 

2978 Wilshlre lil»d.. I os tnfteles 5 • 235 Montgomery St.. San Framltco 4 

710 lewis Bids., 3J3 S\\ Oak St., Portland 4 



30 JANUARY 1950 



83 



For a Lasting 
Impact on a 
Productive 
Market. . . It's 

wspr i : 



The Friendly Voice of Western New England" 

And 

The Dominant Full Time Network Station 

in Springfield, Massachusetts 



Represented By 

George P. Hollingbery Company 

Bertha Bannan (Boston) 



Basic ABC 

WSPR Building 

Springfield 5, Massachusetts 



Want market facts and figures? 



All the basic information market and media 
men use regularly in selecting the markets 
for any consumer product is wrapped up 
,, I ONSl MER M VRKETS. 

Here you find clearly detailed the markel 
characteristics, conditions, and trends in 
mis state, county, and city <>f ">()00 or 
more in the I . S., I . S. Territories and 
Possessions, Canada, and the Philippine-. 

In addition, you'll find much useful quali- 
tative information in media Service \d». 
like the Portland, Oregon Journal's repro- 
luced here, which supplement and expand 
the CM markel data with facts thai onl> 
individual media can offer. 

All SRDS subscribers have CONS1 MER 
MARKETS and hundreds of others have 
purchased copies al $5.00 each. 



I lii- i- one of the 258 Sen ice- 
\d- thai supplement market 
listings in the l"M'» 1950 Edi- 
tion ol I M 



Here's more of the 



r Vriand and fepStwyf 



' r 












Tht JOURNAL Itoii you Jfraiglif '« 0RIG0HS P*0Hl MARKcT! 

FIRST 



»; it bui thrift *o4 Wri 
'11% il latii Oit(H Onjt Siiti 
U% of loll' OrtfU Cmiil Wit Stlti 

11$ ii i (tii o-((« Htm Ma 



The JOURNAL 

means business 




A Section of Standard Rate & Data Service 
Walter E. Botthof, Publisher 

333 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, III. 
New York • Lot Angelex 



all-industr) selling effort. 

\n equally important factor at that 
time, especially as far as the networks 
were concerned, was the widespread 
promotional activity among newspa- 
pers and magazines. In 1947 Life 
magazine, for example, produced a 
presentation which was shown in 60 
cities before more than L75,000 peo- 
ple. Characteristicaslly, Life used 
beautiful pictures to tell its story, 
caught the attention of outstanding 
figures in business and government. 
Newspaper publishers, too. were ex- 
tremely active. People in radio felt 
that the industi \ li.nl to do something 
to match the powerful efforts of the 
print promoters. 

Television hadn't begun its zoom to- 
ward the big time in 1947: yet, it too 
was probably in the back of man) 
minds. All of these factors coming to- 
gether made 1947 the kick-off year. 

Despite the favorable climate of 
opinion, it wasn't easy to develop a 
presentation. The first step after the 
merger of the network and NAB ef- 
forts was to organize a large commit- 
tee to represent all of the elements in 
radio. the All-Radio Presentation 
Committee: it was later incorporated. 
I See box for names and special activi- 
ties of the committee members, i 

Think about all the elements in the 
radio industry. Then \oifll have some 
idea of what the work of the All-Radio 
committee entailed. Its job was to 
adequately present a sales story for 
.">() K\\ network and non-network affi- 
liates, for 5 KAV and 2.">0 watt stations 
as well, for daytime only, foreign lan- 
guage, KM. and farm stations, for 
small town and big < it\ stations. And. 
most important, money had to be 
raised aiming .ill of these scattered 
branches of the industry. 

Ironing out all the problems of or- 
ganization and figuring out how to go 
about telling the treemndous storj ol 
the industr) as a whole took up a lot 
ill lime initially. As a result, it was 

not until L949 that LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS reached the actual pro- 
duction stage. 

For production of the movie and 
lnt its promotion and distribution, a 
budget of Sl.'-SS.OOO was raised. The 
monej came from all of the networks, 
from 560 stations all ovei the country, 
and from radio representatives. 

I he slot \ of how the committee 
-tatted out with this relatively small 
Mini tn spend and evolved a dynamic 
wa\ of telling its slory is a fascinating 



84 



SPONSOR 





199 




TV RESULTS 




First it was 83 




TV RESULTS, 




then we published 




99 TV RESULTS. 




So far, we've exhausted 




three printings. 




The fourth will be 




199 TV RESULTS, and will 




be fully categorized 




and indexed for 




day-to-day use. You'll 




love this one,* even 




more than you did the others. 


*We're accepting limited advertis- 
ing with a 10 February deadline. 
Regular insertion rates apply. Ad- 


SPONSOR 


vertising was not available in 
previous TV RESULTS booklets. 

i 


510 Madison Avenue, New York 22 




He Pulls Lumber Sales 
Out of Thin Air 

Says Mr. 0. T. Griffin. President of the Griffin Lumber 
Co., to Station WWSC, both of Glens Falls, New York: 
'*\\ c are glad to send you our signed renewal contract 
for our sponsorship locally of the Fulton Lewis. Jr. pro- 
gram for another year. We have been thoroughly con- 
vinced 1>\ results in sales of items promoted through this 
program that this tie-in with Fulton Lewis. Jr. is a most 
valuable medium to get our messages across. . . . We 
know that we must have the local audience because defi- 
nite tr-is on merchandise advertised on this program 
have shown increases in sales . . . and we wouldn't trade 
the program for am other one on the air locally 
available." 

• urrentl) sponsored on more than 300 stations, the Ful- 
ton Leu is. Jr. program offers local advertisers nctwoik 
e .it local time cost, with pro-rated talent cost. 

Since there arc more than fjOO MBS stations, there ma\ 
be an opening in your cil\. If you want a ready-made 
audience for a client 1 01 yourself ) , investigate now. 
' lick \ (.hi Mutual outlet or the Co-operative Program 
Department, Mutual Broadcasting System, I 11(1 
Broadway, M< I.': (oi Tribune Tower, Chicago 11). 



one. At the outset there was the 
problem of what form the presenta- 
tion should take. But, taking up where 
the network group had left off, the 
All-Radio Committee agreed a movie 
was superior to slides, charts, or ex- 
hibits and lectures. Ratner remained 
production head of the project and 
Frank Stanton allowed him to spend 
full weeks on it even though he was on 
the CBS payroll at the time. 

Arguments in favor of a movie, by 
the way, were these: 

1. It would be uniformly good 
wherever it was shown, whereas other 
types of presentation are necessarily 
only as good as the man who gives 
them: 

2. A movie can present the max- 
imum amount of information in a 
minimum of time. 

But what kind of a movie, the com- 
mittee members asked themselves. 
Should it be the typical institutional 
film with scattered sequences of the 
industry at work, shots of Radio City, 
scenes inside radio stations, and so 
forth? The answer to this one was 
a resounding NO. The committee mem- 
bers wanted to do something that was 
truly original and dramatic. More- 
over, they didn't want to describe the 
inside of the radio industry. They 
wanted to show where radio went and 
not where it came from. The movie 
they finally came up with does not have 
a single shot of the interior of a studio. 

Prior to the merger of the network 
and NAB presentations. Victor Ratner 
had prepared a three-volume mimeo- 
graphed report on the radio industry: 
it was to serve as a factual basis for 
the network promotion. This report 
was carried over for use by that all- 
radio group. Called "The Sound of 
America.'' it is probably the most com- 
plete compilation of facts and figures 
about the industry ever prepared in its 
history (see article called Facts That 
Talk for excerpts I . 

LIGHTNING THAT TALKS doesn't 
follow Ratner s report line by line. 
Instead it makes entertainment out of 
it. Hatner. with the help of committee 
members, look the raw facts in his re- 
port and wrapped them up in an in- 
teresting narrative. 

In brief, the story line is this. At 
the picture's opening Benjamin Frank- 
lin is shown up in heaven where he's 
continuing his famous kite experiments 

with lightning. Suddenly, Franklin 

hears a radio announcer's voice com- 
mini! out of the key tied to the end of 



86 



SPONSOR 




^mte^ 



The basic facts about 



CANADIAN 
NETWORK RADIO 



The moment Canadian Radio enters your advertising plans, you 
should have this book. It's the only book of its kind! Based on the 
1948 Survey of the Bureau of Broadcast Measurement, it puts you 
completely "in the picture" about Canadian Network Radio Coverage. 

You'll find in this concise 
reference guide: 

* Comprehensive breakdown of network circulation by provinces, in 
the areas covered by the three Canadian Networks — Trans-Canada, 
French and Dominion. 

* Three big, easy-to-read maps, showing locations of basic and sup- 
plementary stations of the three Canadian Networks in the markets 
they serve. 

* Network Stations, power, frequencies and time zones. 



Yes, this book is invaluable to every radio advertiser and 
agency interested in Canada! Write for a copy now . . . 
and if you have any additional questions on your mind 
about the use of Canadian Network Radio, send them 
along, too. Ask for "Networks Coverage — 1949." 



CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION 




COMMERCIAL DIVISION 



354 Jarvis Street 
Toronto 5, Ontario 



1231 St. Catherine Street West 
Montreal 25, Quebec 



30 JANUARY 1950 



87 



WTAL 




TALLAHASSEE 

5000 Watts — Day and Night 
the center of 

Capitaland 

Selling 

12 

Georgia Counties 

and 

11 

Florida Counties 

Ask your John Blair 
man to tell you the full 
story on Capitaland and 
North Florida's most 
powerful radio voice — 
WTAL! 

Southeastern Rep. 

Harry E. Cummings 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

WTAL 

TALLAHASSEE 

John H. Phipps, Owner 
L. Herschel Graves, Gen'l Mgr. 

FLORIDA GROUP 

Columbia 

Broadcasting 

System 



his kite string. "\\ hat?' he asks, "have 
the) made lightning talk?" and sets 
ofT for the earth to find out. 

In the course of his exploration. 
Franklin travels the country, sees four 
successful radio campaigns in action. 
He also visits Proctor & Gamhle head- 
quarters in Cincinnati and examines 
charts which tell the overall story of 
radio in the U. S. At one point he 
listens in on a speech hy a professor 
of journalism which slights the role of 
radio in the American economy; then 
he hears an effective rehuttal of the 
professor's point of view I hy BAB's 
Maurice Mitchell I and returns to heav- 
en convinced that radio is America's 
most dynamic selling medium. 

The movie is an unusual blend of 
fantasy and realism. Though Frank- 
lin and his descent from heaven are 
as imaginative as you can get. all of 
the rest of the picture is as down-to- 
earth as a newsreel. ActualK. Ben- 
jamin Franklin and the professor of 
journalism are the only actors in it. 
All of the other performers are ordi- 
nary people playing their real life 
roles. Thus, in an experience sequence 
filmed at Columbus. Georgia, a depart- 
ment store manager is shown talking 
to a radio station manager about the 
possibility of selling diamonds over the 
radio. These two men are merely re- 
enacting before the camera an actual 
conversation which had taken place a 
few r months before. They used the 
same words, too. as nearly as they 
could recall. 

The professional movie man who's 
compan) filmed LIGHTNING THAT 
TALKS is Ben Gradus. president of the 
International Movie Producers" Service 
I IMPS |. Gradus is a top-notch docu- 
mentarian. He's worked with \\ illard 
Van I)\ke. famous documentar\ movie 
pioneer who filmed "The City": and 
with Joseph \ on Sternberg, the Holly- 
wood producer who discovered Mar- 
line Dietrich. He knows how to handle 
people who aren't actors and make 
them feel comfortable in front of the 
camera. This knack was essential for 
the success of LIGHTNING THAT 
TALKS. 

\\ hen Roberto Rosellini i of '"< >pen 
Citj and In grid Bergman fame i 
goes out to do one of his documentary- 
style movies most of the actors are 
non-professional. Put at least Rossellini 
has onl) a single casl to deal with at 

one location I like the Island of Strom- 

boli). Gradus, on t H<- other hand. 

couldn t Stick to one place and one set 



cheek V 

FIGURES .... 

eheek V 

il 1 1 1 Li 1 .... 

eheek V 

RATINGS.... 

a it 4 1 thvn ... 
eheek 

KATZ 

for 
I ii cl usl pi — It i «• li 

NEWCASTLE 

Pennsylvania 
sorvotl bv 

WKST 

MUTUAL 

1. 000 WATTS 

represented by 
The KatZ Agency 



88 



SPONSOR 



When Mickey and Felix 
were our leadino 



44 



Tl "stars... 



Those celebrated "movie actors" — 

Mickey Mouse and Felix the Cat — were 

pioneer helpers in television research 



No. I in a Series Tracing the High 
Points in Television History 

Photos from the historical collection of RCA 



• Strange though it seems, two toys had much to do with 
television as you now enjoy it! As "stand-ins" during tele- 
vision's early days, Mickey Mouse and Felix the Cat helped 
RCA scientists and engineers gather priceless information. 

Choice of this pair was no accident. Their crisply modelled 
black-and-white bodies were an ideal target for primitive tele- 
vision cameras. The sharp contrast they provided was easy 
to observe on experimental kinescopes. 

Would living actors have done as well? No, for what RCA 
scientists were studying — as they trained their cameras on the 
two toys — was the effect of changes and improvements in 
instruments and telecasting techniques. With living actors it 
could never have been absolutely certain that an improve- 





The iconoscope, electronic "eye" of television, invented by 
Dr. V. K. Zworykin, of RCA Laboratories. 



Felix the Cat and Mickey Mouse acre, during television's experi- 
mental period, the most frequently televised actors on the air. 
Using them as "stand-ins," RCA engineers gathered basic data on 
instruments and techniques. 



ment in the televised image came from an improvement in 
equipment and techniques — or from some unnoticed change 
in an actor's appearance, clothing, make-up. Mickey and 
Felix provided a "constant," an unchanging target which led 
to more exact information about television . . . 

Problem after problem was met by RCA scientists, with the 
results you now enjoy daily- For example: In the "Twenties" 
and early "Thirties," there were still people who argued for 
mechanical methods of producing a television image, despite 
the obvious drawbacks of moving parts in cameras and re- 
ceivers. Then Dr. V. K. Zworykin, now of RCA Laboratories, 
perfected the iconoscope, to give television cameras an all- 
electronic "eye"— without a single moving part to go wrong. 
Today, this same all-electronic principle is used in the RCA 
Image Orthicon camera, the supersensitive instrument which 
televises action in the dimmest light! 

Also developed at about this time, again by Dr. Zworykin, 
was the kinescope. It is the face of this tube which is the 
"screen" of your home television receiver, and on its fluores- 
cent coating an electron "gun"— shooting out thousands of 
impulses a second — creates sharp, clear pictures in motion. 
Those who may have seen NRC's first experimental telecasts 
will remember the coarseness of the image produced. Con- 
trast that with the brilliant, "live" image produced by the 
525-line "screen" on present RCA Victor television receivers! 

Credit RCA scientists and engineers for the many basic 
developments and improvements which have made television 
an important part of your daily life. Rut don't forget Mickey 
Mouse and Felix. They helped, too! 



i^^f Radio Corporation of America 

^8^ WORLD LEADER IN RADIO — FIRST IN TELEVISION 



30 JANUARY 1950 



89 



of amateur actors. To tell radio's 
stor) well. LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 
had to show several different radio 
campaigns taking place in widely sepa- 
rate parts of the country. There are 
sequences showing how radio helped 
sell peaches and insurance in Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa; one showing how diam- 
onds were sold in Columbus, Georgia; 
and another in San Francisco on the 
success of a milk company's radio ad- 
vertising campaigns. 

Experience stories shown in the film, 
incidently. were selected from several 
hundred collected by Maurice Mitchell. 
They make up a balanced cross-section 



of radio advertising; every categorj 
of things to sell is covered — from over- 
ripe peaches which class as perishables 
to imperishable diamonds, from a tan- 
gible every-day item like milk to an 
intangible like insurance. 

To get background information for 
each of the experience stories, Gradus 
made a 25.000-mile trip around the 
country this summer. At Columbus. 
Georgia, for example, he interviewed 
over fifty residents, asking them how 
they had been influenced by the radio 
campaign for diamonds. Gradus picked 
the most interesting and representative 
people to appear in the movie. There 



NO P.I. DEALS!... 
One Rate For All! 



WE DO NOT ACCEPT P.I. PROPOSITIONS 

It's a matter of principle. We make our money from the sale 
of time — and we do well. We refuse to enter into competition 
with any manufacturer or advertiser, or any dealers or agents 
representing them. We sell for YOU — Mr. Advertiser — 
NOT US! We're in the business of entertainment and service 
to the public, providing YOU a great audience for YOU to 
reach with YOUR sales message. 

Any Hooper report will prove that we consistently accomplish 
that job. Our never-longer-than-now list of clients proves that 
most advertisers recognize and appreciate that. 



WE DO NOT CUT RATES 



WE DO NOT VARY RATES 



We have one rate — and one rate only. No one can buy time 
on KRNT cheaper than you. No one pays more than you. It's 
one rate for all. This is a long-established policy. There's no 
such thing as "get it for me wholesale". Everyone can earn the 
same low-rate-per-impact. 



Our Listeners and Advertisers Have Long Since Learned 
That Our Principles Are Not for Sale. And That's One of 
the Reasons That KRNT Is One of the Nation's Most-Used, 
Most-Believed-ln, Most-Proved and Highest-Hooperated 
Stations. 




The station with the fabulous personalities and the astronomical Hoopers 



was the boy who got up enough nerve 
to propose to his girl while they were 
both listening to a commercial for 
diamond rings: and air copy per- 
suaded several alreadv married couples 
that the wife just had to have an en- 
gagement ring even years after the 
marriage itself I a situation reminiscent 
of Clarence Days "Life with Mother"' 
where the whole plot revolves around 
Mrs. Day's lack of a suitable engage- 
ment ring) . 

After completing this trip, Gradus 
reported what he'd seen to Ratner who 
wrote the final script. Then, when 
Gradus took his cameras on the road, 
he found himself with dozens of un- 
foreseen problems to solve. Mainly it 
was his amateur actors. Some of them 
turned out to be prima donnas in the 
rough. You couldn't keep them from 
over-acting. Others were so shy they 
couldn't speak their lines coherently. 
But Gradus managed to draw con- 
vincing and natural performances out 
of even the hammiest and most intro- 
verted people. 

Some of his worst troubles came in 
Cedar Rapids. There several of the 
people Gradus had selected for the cast 
wanted to back out. An octogenarian 
who looked as if he'd just stepped out 
of a Grant Wood painting and was 
ideal as a typical middle westerner 
couldn't remember his lines. A young 
boy who had agreed to play in one 
scene during the previous summer was 
back in school — and his teacher 
wouldn't let him miss classes. Gradus 
managed to straighten things out. 
though. He gave the grandpa a silent 
part, talked the youngster into playing 
hookey for a short time. 

Because scenes had to be shot over 
and over again till the amateur actors 
did them perfectly. Gradus used a total 
of 50.000 feet of film to get 4,000 
useable feet. But costs in general were 
held to a minimum. The film was made 
for $85,000, a relatively low figure. 
This includes both a full-length version 
of LIGHTNING THAT TALKS which 
runs to 45 minutes and is on 35mm 
and lOinni film and two shorter ver- 
sions on 35 or 16mm which are in- 
tended for school and business lunch- 
eon showings. Both editions of the film 
have Miichronized sound tracks. In 
the short or long version. LIGHTNING 
should delight most viewers. 

Despite its excellence, LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS is not expected to ac- 
lunlh sell one minute of time for any- 
hod) . 



90 



SPONSOR 




THE 



station representatives 



DETROIT 
SAN FRANCISCO 



KATZ AGENCY, 

INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO 
i KANSAS CITY • ATLANTA 
LOS ANGELES • DALLAS 



\- Victor Ratncr explains it: "The 
pieture isn t designed to clinch sales. 
It - 'the door opener' — opening up peo- 
ple's minds to a fuller realization of 
how big and strong radio has become. 
After potential clients have seen the 
film, it 11 be up to individual station 
and network people to get in and tell 
their own specific sales stories. No 
presentation can suhstitute for direct 
salesmanship. But we think that 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS puts over 
for all kinds of businessmen, from the 
Henr\ Fords to the small dealers, our 
basic point: that radio, all of it from 



morning till night, in small towns, 
cities, and in the country, is the most 
effective advertising medium there is." 

The members of the All-Radio Pres- 
entation Committee, who worked like 
Trojans for over two vears to see the 
job through, hope that LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS won't be the last all- 
industr) promotion effort. The com- 
mittee will remain in existence with 
the expectation that new members will 
come in and take up where the present 
members leave off. 

It definitely looks as if radio will 
keep talking up for itself from now on. 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PiO*t&e/l RADIO STATION 



M** 



=„ st«,o» n*?. -23S- ' 



*HUUr^ - AUDIENCE 

SHAKE OF BROADCAST A^ 

HOMES USING SETS 
TIME 

Monday thru Friday 
8:00 AM-W-00 Noon 

11.00 Noon-6-00 I 

Sunday thru Saturday 
6 ..OOPM-10--30PM 



Other 

24.9 l^V °- 4 
HOOPER, I«; 



Get the entire story from 
FREE & PETERS 



111 


DBJ 


CBS . 5000 WATTS • 960 KC 


A 




Owned and Operated by the 
TIMES- WORLD CORPORATION 


/^S 


mm 

FRE 


WW0W 

E & PETERS. I! 


ROANOKE, VA. 

JC National Representatives 


£tl 



510 Madison 



be associated with this group of men. 
Gordon Gray 

J ice-President 
WIP. Philadelphia. 



Now that the All-Radio Presentation 
is a reality, many broadcasters are ask- 
ing themselves this question: "'Just 
what will the promotion do for me?" 

I think the answer is most important. 
The broadcaster who doesn't under- 
stand the potential in a promotion ef- 
fort is the man most likely to miss out 
on results inherent in the project. 

All the broadcasters and specialists 
who worked together to produce 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS agree on 
this one thing: "This All-Radio promo 
tion movie was not designed to make 
advertisers or prospective advertisers 
leap out of their seats, rush to their 
desks and sign a 52-week radio con- 
tract." Instead, it was designed to do 
what any intelligently planned sales 
promotion is designed to do — warm up 
the prospect. 

LIGHTNING THAT TALKS should 
be used by broadcasters with this rea- 
soning in mind: it can deliver to them 
the prestige that conic- from associa- 
tion with a medium which looks and 
sounds the way radio does in this film. 
It can deliver to them a background of 
acceptance that is portrayed in the 
film and by association with the scenes 
and sounds in the movie. It can make 
a local broadcaster appear to be a re- 
sult-producing, widely-accepted, well- 
liked, advertising counselor. 

His next step must be to present his 
own local selling stor\ in such a fash- 
ion that the client signs his contract. 

Maurice B. Mitchell 

Secretary 

All-Radio Presentation 

Committee 



We in Canadian broadcasting have 
always Fell the affinit) <>1 commercial 

radio on both sides of the border. 
Therefore, on behali of the complete 

membership of the CAB, we welcome a 
sales tool as important as LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS. You may be sure thai 

this magnificent documentary film will 
be shown to advertisers and agencies 
throughout the Dominion. 

T. Jim \u.\m> 
Pat Freeman 
Canadian Association 
of Broadcasters 



92 



SPONSOR 




"Ugh... no (sob) ...KJR" 




SEATTLE 



5000 WATTS AT 950 kc. 



$tJt*/M& 



wim 



KJR doesn't reach everybody! 

But KJR does blanket the rich western Washington market, 
where 1,321,100 radio listeners enjoy one of the world's 
richest-per-capita incomes. 

Best of all, KJR's 5000 watts at 950 kc. cover the import- 
ant area that any 50,000 watts would reach (check your 
BMB). 

And "the beauty of it is" — it costs YOU so much LESS! 
Talk with A VER Y-KNODEL, Inc., about KJR! 

for Western Washington. ..An Affiliate of the 
American Broadcasting Company 



30 JANUARY 1950 



93 







Service 



to the broadcaster 



Service is one' ot the basic theme songs ot 
BMI. The nation'* broadcasters are using all 
o! the BMI aids to programming . . . it- ^i»t 
and varied repertoire . . . it- useful and sale- 
able program continuities ... it* research 
facilities . . . and all of the element* which 
are within the scope ot music in broadcasting;. 

1 he station manager, program director, mu- 
sical director, disc joekej anil librarian take- 
daih adrantage of the numerou- ti me ca ving 
and research-saving functions provided bj 
BML 

Uong with service to the broadcaster — AM. 
r M. and r\ — BMI i- constanth gaining new 
outlets, building new repertoire- ot' mu-ie. 
and constant!} expanding it- activities. 

1 he BMI broadcast licensee can be depended 
upon to meet e>erN music requirement. 



EVERYBODY EVERYWHERE 
PERFORMS BMI-LICENSED MUSIC 



BMI-Licensed Music has been broadcast b> 
;•;■• performing artist, big name and small 
name, on e>er> program, both commercial and 
sustaining. over e\er> network and e>erv lo- 



cal station in the United States and Canada 
E>er> concert Artist. Vocalist and instrumen- 
talist, and every s>mphcn> orchestra in the 
World has performed BMI licensed music. 



Broadcast Music. Inc. 

5S0 Fifth Avenue New York 19. N. Y. 
'.E.n YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLUsOOD . TORONTO • MONTREAL 



SPONSOR 



THE BIG DRIVE 
Continued from 

Hie -tar didn't Stop vrith reminding 
hi- inti- the) had to huy Marin Dell 
rnilk to keep him on die air. H- 
Hated the) demand Marin Dell prod- 
ucts from their retail stores. I h- did. 

It is impossible to reconstruct in 
a< t detail either the quality or the 
quantity of personal, individual im- 
pressions that made people, more and 
more people, ask for B 
fe< hrii'-ally . jres, it wa- the "Marin Dell 
Amateur Hour." fJut to his far.- the 
potential Marin Del. 
hour wa- strict!) Budda's. Price and 
taste of the product were indistinguish- 
able from competing items. Budda 
alone was the difference That and the 
miracle that projected his warm laugh- 
ter, hi- nonsense, ms milk toasts to the 
community's ^reat and near great on 
Saturday night-. 

There came a day when Tom Foe 
got wind that one of their strongest 
petitors, Carnation, was about to 



WANNA 
WHITTLE 
AWAY AT 
BARLOW 

(Ky.)? 

.„ to eao e out 
^' -ale- -n Baric. ^ u ) ^ 

don't u-* *** h or *«•■« 

- nl w'r^reaTXt *»***» 
enough to rtru 
bottomland. ^ 

But liWe «JVJvE ^n-^nd 

< i, "'*-^, U RelTil Trading Z— * 
Thl . i. the rich. . Kenlu ,W>. 
important -" re are 40 c c 

«I "He '\nd W *">* - 
of the ^<»te. 

mo „ >m do * n ' - t TOU like 



get the jump on thern in 5 
nearby ."^anta Clara County, popnla 
68,000), where neit:. i had 

distribution. If Carnation got ' 
first, it would :<e just that much harder 
for M irii Dell to force d 
tribution later on. 

What happened v*hen Carnation's 
carefully guarded lecret leaked to I 
ter ores an idea of how quickly, bow 
-uely. the ii - e to 

radio cai 
picturi - Hfe 4 

mation 
routed his - 



— ih- extra . 

take an ear. 
into - 

a deal with t.- 

L- 
urged to a.sk their d 
Del: 

i 
But 

- 
that their cut 

- • ■ .. 




We Got It 



IF you wont sales from 80 r > of Pennsyl- 
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And don't forget 



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30 JANUARY 1950 



:-: 



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FIRST in 

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WOC delivers this rich market to NBC Network, national spot 
and local advertisers . . . with 70 to 100",'. BMD penetration in the 
two-county Quad City area ... 10 to 100% in adjacent counties. 



WOC -TV 



Channel 5 
22.9 Kw. Video 



12.5 Kw. Audio 



V- 



On the Quad Cities' first TV station NBC Network (non-inter- 
connected), local and film programs reach over 5,000 Quad Cities' 
sets . . . hundreds more in a 75 air-mile radius. 

Basic NBC Affiliate 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
Ernest Sanders, General Manager 



DAVENPORT, IOWA 

FREE & PETERS, Inc. 

Exclusive National Representatives 




program. e\en though the\ had never 
seen them in the stores. 

DeBorba was able to rite hundreds 
of letters from San Jose written to 
Budda. most of them saying the writer 
would buv his products if his sponsor 
expanded to San Jose. When film- 
maker Ben Gradus was in town arrang- 
ing for scenes to illustrate Marin Dells 
successful sortie into San Jose, he was 
able to talk with, and later film, peo- 
ple who had written Budda to ask why 
Marin Dell didn't come to their town. 

Dealers who refused to be convinced 
that first day. or during that week, 
fell into line as soon as Budda went to 
work the following Saturday night. He 
told his San Jose friends that Marin 
Dell was there - - urged them to ask 
tardy dealers who hadn't stocked his 
products to do so right away. 

It took about four broadcasts to en- 
able Marin I )ell salesmen to crack the 
major outlets thev wanted. After that 
it was easy. 

Achieving distribution in areas 
where the program is heard outside 
San Francisco Count) presents no seri- 
ous problem. Budda merely has to ad- 
vise his friends in those areas that 
Marin Dell is moving in. Listeners 
then go to work on the retail outlets. 

Some of Marin Dell's competitors 
have used radio off and on in the past. 
Some are using it now. But none has 
applied Tom Foster's most open secret: 
consistent broadcasting without a break 
since the day he went on the air 14 
years ago. 

\inet\ percent of the advertising 
budget now goo to radio. 'I he 10', 
remaining is divided between car cards 
and trade magazines, such as Grocer's 
Advocate. \t the start of business in 
L935, Marin Dell was worth $30,000. 
Now its worth is more than $4,000,- 
000. Via thousands of letters, listeners 
in Alameda. Contra Costa and other 
counties are clamoring to boost that 
$4,000,000 the) want to bu) Marin 
Dell products in their stores, too. * * * 



DAVISON'S 

i Continual from page 41 I 

Whal could you do for m\ jewelrj de- 
partment ? 

// oodall: "Hanged if 1 know." 
Ihrd: "What do you mean you 
don t know?" 

/( oodall: "Give me some [acts to go 

mi ami some time. ^ nu sa\ \ ou've 
eol a sick baby. Well, if I were a doc- 



96 



SPONSOR 



u 



Here's 
a place 
that's reall y 
radio-active 



i/ifjsociated 
Jew ice 




Write and ask about Associated Shows That Sell"* Radio planned features which today 



are building station audience, sales and profits in markets like yours 



everywhere 



Yes-Associated IS radio-active. 




6 BASIC RAD.o Program SER>M C * 



ASSOCIATED PROGRAM SERVICE, 151 West 46 Street, New York 19, N. Y. 

30 JANUARY 1950 97 



tor \ou"d give me all the facts so 1 
could make a diagnosis."' 

At this point Hyrd disclosed exactly 
how badlv the jewelry department had 
fared and Woodall promised he would 
either come up with a campaign he 
thought could sell diamonds or refuse 
to take the account. Then he went 
back to his office to think. 

For Woodall this was an important 
account to get and keep. If he could 
il<> well for Davison's, other local mer- 
chants would hear about it. express re- 
newed enthusiasm for radio. If he 
flopped. Bill Byrd and other merchan- 



dising men in Columbus would be 
radio haters for a long time to come. 
Woodall was a man with a problem. 

The whole WDAK staff was turned 
loose on the problem — from the station 
manager to the switchboard girl. 
Woodall wanted some program — or 
slogan — that would get across the 
idea that Davison's was now the place 
to go for expensive diamond rings. 

One June evening just before Fath- 
er's Day, Woodall retired to his room 
thinking about the Father's Day pres- 
ents he might expect from his two 
young sons. All that day he had been 



" <p >e nt ktW IxWdSr/ 





I Topeka — a 2lcoun- 
,y market' that has 
28% of the state's 
effective buying power and 23% 
of all Kansas families. 
* Audit Bureau of Circulation 

WIBW is the station "listened to 
most" by buyers in the Topeka 
Market . . . three times more 
listeners than all other Topeka 
stations put together. 
""Kansas Radio Audience 1949 



WIBW's farm mar- 
ket is made up of 
big-buying families 
and in agricultural 
communities in Kansas and ad- 
joining states.* 
'''Consumer Markets, 1949 

Here again, WIBW is the "most 
listened to" station having ten 
times as many listeners through- 
out Kansas as all other Topeka 
stations combined.* 
* Kansas Radio Audience 1949 



Just one station — WIBW — gives you the hardest hitting selling force in 
both city and farm markets. 



For the CITY Market 
For the FARM Market 

WIBW 



All You Need Is 

WIBW 



fr 



SERVING AND SELLING 

"THE MAGIC CIRCLE" 

WIBW • TOPEKA, KANSAS • WIBW-FM 




exposed to one-minute Father's Day 
announcements over his station. The 
subject kept running through his head. 

"Dad also means Diamonds At 
Davison's," he thought to himself. 

That's how Woodall began to devel- 
op a slogan and an advertising ap- 
proach that cured Byrd's sick baby. 

Before long. Woodalls full plan was 
this. He conceived a teaser campaign 
built around the word dad. Ten times 
day and night, between station breaks 
on WDAK. an announcer would shout: 
"D— A— D. Not dad but D— A— D." 
This was intended to go on for several 
days. On the fifth day the teaser an- 
nouncements, now more explicit, would 
urge listeners to tune in on a 15-minute 
program scheduled for that evening. 
This would be the tipoff program. 
Following, both the short teaser an- 
nouncements and daily 15-minute pro- 
grams would continue until one month 
had gone by. Meanwhile there was to 
be no money spent for newspaper ad- 
vertising of the diamonds. 

Cost for the whole radio campaign 
would be exactly $400. 

Byrd quickly agreed to try Wood- 
all's scheme. As an additional sales 
gimmick. Woodall suggested that Davi- 



Rep: CAPPER PUBLICATIONS, Inc. ■ BEN LUDY, Gen. Mgr. • WIBW • KCKN 




KQV's switchboard lights up 
like a Christinas Tree after 
Bill Burns' 1 Noon News eaeh 
day. There's ample reason for 
this since Bill is the town's 
most alert reporter. In two 
months, he doubled the sta- 
tion's Hooper 12 Noon to 
12:15, and during 20 broad- 
cast days in December, Bill 
sold I .}{22 Toy Carnivals at a 
dollar each. Burns is avail- 
able now. Weed & Company 
will be glad to give you the 
details. 



KQV 



MBS — 5,000 Watts — 1410 



98 



SPONSOR 



Reminder, for an 



AUTOMOBILE 



manufacturer: 



SPOT 
RADIO 



keeps sales a-rolling... along every 
highway and byway of the country! 



ASK 
YOUR 
JOHN 
BLAIR 
MAN! 



Nowadays, it's the sales force that keeps auto 
production lines busy. And nowadays, many an auto 
salesman finds Spot Radio his hardest-hitting, farthest- 
reaching selling tool! 

Automakers use Spot Radio to break fast with 
news of new models. They use it to bolster weak 
dealers, to give strong ones deserved support. 
They use it to strike home repeatedly with facts 
about features ... to make millions of prospects 
ripe for sales! 

Your John Blair man has ready now a 
plan for selling automobiles profitably with 
Spot Radio. He's also prepared to make Spot 
Radio pay off for any other product . . . 
whether it sells for thousands of dollars 
or just a few cents. Ask him about it! 



REPRESENTING LEADING RADIO STATIONS 



JOHN 
BLAIR 








S COMPANY 






Offices in CHICAGO • NEW YORK • 


ST. LOUIS • 


DALLAS DETROIT • 


SAN FRANCISCO 


• LOS ANGELES 


30 JANUARY 1950 








99 



son's advertise S25 discount certificates 
on diamonds over the L5-minute pro- 
gram. I lie give-aua\ would take ihe 
form o! prizes in a music i|uiz so easy 
that only listeners recently arrived 
from I ilu't could fail to guess the an- 
swers. (The "mystery" tunes included: 
"Home Sweet Home." "Vm Are My 
Sunshine," and "Sweet Adeline."") 

On most diamond rings or bracelets 
a $25 discount means little since the 
diamond mark-up is high. Recogniz- 
ing the psychological force that pos- 
session ol a $25 discount slip could 
exert. Byrd approved the discount gim- 



mick as welt. 

Events quickl) proved the soundness 
of the campaign's approach. \\ ithin 
two weeks Davison's jewelry depart- 
ment had sold over 100 diamonds. 
\nne of these stones was valued at 
under $100; most cost more. I Byrd 
was so enthusiastic that he asked 
\\ I. ill t" continue the It \ I > sat- 
uration campaign and the music quiz 
for two weeks beyond the month sched- 
uled in original plans. 

Ben Gradus, the movie producer who 
filmed LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. i< 
not a native of Columbus. Yet he 



"A Great Contribution 
To Our Success" 



IMPS 



International Movie Producers' Service 



575 Madison Avenue, New York 22, A'. V 

ELdorado 5-6620 

Cable Address: iMPSr.RVICE 

January 19, 1950 

Rangertone, Inc. 
73 Winthrop Street 
Newark 4, New Jersey 

Dear Colonel Ranger: 

The Rangertone lias paid off again. 

The first time we used your synchronous tape recorder 

was m the I'. S. Army and Air Force Recruiting film, 

CAREER DECISION. There it took a lot of punish 

mint -operating in the midst of explosions during sham 

battles while the earth shook beneath it and debris flew 

everywhere. 

LIGHTNING THAT TALKS was offered to us as a full 

dialogue film to be shot on, location and on a eompara 

tivelj small budget. We knew, from our previous happy 

experiences with I. MI'S' Rangertone, that this was no 

problem. 

This time the Rangertone travelled some 25,000 miles and 
tin use of synchronous tape recording has again set the 
dialogue film within the scope of the documentary ami 
commercial films which IMPS produces. 

Vour equipment made a great contribution toward the 
realization of our success. 
Thanks again, 

Sincerely yours, 



\^* oJ/VgJL^ 



IK. :. h 



Ben Gradus 



Many other prominent users are equally enthusiastic in their 
praise of Rangertone. Writ? for Descriptive Literature. 

RANGERTONE, INC., 73 Winthrop St., Newark 4, N. J. 



RANGERTONE 

TAPE RECORDERS 



knows more than does any man in Co- 
lumbus, what the real effect of the 
l)a\ison radio campaign was. For 
Gradus did a one-man survey of Davi- 
son diamond customers last summer to 
find out just how radio had influenced 
them. It was by this grass-roots ap- 
proach that he selected performers for 
LIGHTNING. 

Gradus interviewed over 50 people 
at length in and around Columbus. One 
thing that struck him right away was 
the effectiveness of the $25 discount. 
People who had called up the station 
to name the mystery tune felt that they 
had actually won a valuable though 
frustrating prize. Their fingers itched 
to turn the prize from paper into a $25 
sa\ings on a diamond. 

One thirteen-year-old girl was among 
the over 4.000 Columbus residents who 
got a discount slip. She went to her 
father, urged that she be allowed to 
buy a diamond ring. 

"No," roared the father, the first 
day she pleaded with him. 

"Absolutely not." he said the second 
day. 

When Ben Gradus interviewed the 
young girl, she was careful to hold up 
her hand so that he couldn't miss the 
dinner ring she eventually cajoled out 
of poppa — on an economy platform. 

One man Gradus interviewed was so 
anxious to get a $25 discount that he 
bucked a busy signal for over one hour 
to phone in his mystery tune answer. 
This was a common experience for 
listeners since WDAK has only three 
incoming trunks; they were all in use 
from the moment the Davison show 
went on the air till an hour afterwards. 
(There were L50 calls each day for the 
first few days and an average of 100 
calls a day over a 6-week period. I 

The thing that astounded Gradus 
most about the diamonds campaign 
was the number ol married men who 
bought engagement rings for their 
wives after listening to air copy. The 
commercials were slanted so as to ap- 
peal to ever) conceivable type of cus- 
tomer: engaged couples: married cou- 
ples who hadn't had money for rings 
until recently; crafts couples who 
might be tempted 1>\ the point that dia- 
monds won't decline in value, max 
grow in worth oa er the \cars. 

During the time that the radio cam- 
paign was in effect. onl\ one customer 
came in to bin a diamond without a 
discount certificate. Since the certifi- 
cates were given awa\ onl\ to those 
who illumed tin- radio station, this is 
impressive e\idence that the great ma- 



100 



SPONSOR 



rHAT'S RIGHT! 

£ This may be news to you — but the happy fact is that the famous 

Quiz Kids program may be sponsored by you in your territory! 
(Of course, the great national show goes merrily on ... in its 
tenth year for the same sponsor,) 

It's as simple as A-B-C! Local Quiz Kid shows are easily pro- 
duced with letterperfect scripts and complete promotion kits 
produced by the network Quiz Kids staff. All you have to do 
is choose the children and the emcee! 

AVAILABLE 

If you'd care to know how these local Quiz Kids programs are 

FOR LOCAL 

doing, just look over the record below. And then get in touch 
jrUNbORSH P! w ' tn us> The cost is extremely modest. 




THESE ARE RESULTS! 



NEW YORK CITY, (WNBC) Savings Bank Association of Greater New York. 
Highest rating in its time slot in competition with 9 other stations. 

EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN, (WEAU) A. F. Schwahn Sausage Company. 
60.9% of all listeners at end of first month. 

BATON ROUGE, LA., (WJBO) Jack's Cookie Company. 

Highest rating in its time slot in competition with Baton Rouge station and New Orleans stations. 

ROCHESTER, MINN., (KROC) Good Foods, Inc. (Skippy Peanut Butter). 

In face of nation-wide decline in peanut butter sales, Skippy sales increased 6 per cent in Rochester area. 

ELKHART, INDIANA, (WTRC) 1st National Bank. 
Ending second year for same sponsor. 

WICHITA, KAN., (KANS) Henry Clothing. 

Sponsor well pleased and theater from which show originates reports big box office increase on those nights. 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK., (KARK) Colonial Baking Company. 

Following highly successful series last year with top rating in its time slot renewed this year under same 
sponsorship. 

LAUREL, MISS., (WAML) Carter-Heide Dept. Store. 
Same sponsor completing second year. 

SYRACUSE, NEW YORK. (WSYR) Banking Association of Greater New York. 
Started after same sponsor's success in New York City. 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA, Dairy Mart Farms. 

Sponsor very happy with program and show assured a long life. 



| Jfel | iy f± f*£\\AM J% Rkl 8 South Mlchl - 3n Avenue Madison Avenue 



INC* Chicago, Illinois New York, New York 



joritv of sales during that period were 
due to the radio campaign. 

To back up this conclusion, here's 
what Ben Gradus -a\>: "When I asked 
people whv ihev hadn't bought dia- 
mond:- at Davison's previous to the 
radio campaign the) said the) d nevei 
noticed the ads in the newspapers. Hut 
the) all said they had been prompted 
to direct action 1>\ radio." 

One of the important factors in the 
success ol the radio campaigning was 
it> timing. Though Byrd was anxious 
to get started right after \\ oodall out- 
lined his D — A — I) idea, the campaign 



was delayed several days. It had to 
start near the end of the month at the 
right time to impress soldiers stationed 
at Fort Benning as well as others on 
monthh payrolls. 

Time for the l.i-minutc music quiz 
show changed on alternate davs from 
1:45 to 0:30 and back. This caught 
women at home after lunch on one day 
and men at home for supper the next. 
In other words, first the ladies got a 
chance to fix their sights on a diamond 
ring. Then the next day hubb) was 
exposed to Davison's sales talk over 
the supper table. This helped wives set 



1949_A YEAR OF GREATER 
GAINS FOR WBNS — 

The 25th year of WBNS broadcasting gave more strength to this 
station's already predominant position in central Ohio. Many 
thousands of listeners were added to the WBNS vast audience 
by judicious program building . . . And among radio advertisers 
WBNS was naturally first choice in central Ohio. More national 
advertisers used WBNS during 1949 than any other Columbus 
station because experience proves that WBNS pulls greater re- 
turns at less cost. 



YOU BUY MORE THAN RADIO 
TIME ON WBNS — 

WBNS is not just another radio station here in central Ohio. It 
is an important part of the daily life of every home in this rich 
area. Yes, it is one of the family who provides entertainment, 
news and education for more than 163,550 other families. WBNS 
has built this audience year after year. We know its likes and 
dislikes. That's why we produce radio that is welcomed by 
listeners and profitable to advertisers. 



WHEN SANTA CAME TO COLUMBUS 
WBNS GAVE EXCLUSIVE COVERAGE 

It's a gala time here in Columbus when the F. & R. Lazarus Com- 
pany department store welcomes Santa. There are parades, floats, 
special events and thousands throng the streets and visit the 
store to see jolly Saint Nick. Every day WBNS broadcasted 
the Laiarus official Santa Claus show with a simulcast on WBNS- 
TV so that no one in central Ohio who had ears and eyes missed 
out on the doings of the rotund old gentleman. 



COVERS 
cr 4TRAL OH\51 



IN COLUMBUS, OHIO IT'S 



rr 



POWER S000 D-1000-N CBS 



ASK JOHN BLAIR 



uj> little selling campaigns in their own 
homes. Naturally, commercial copy for 
the afternoon and evening shows \aried 
according^ . B\ dav the ladies were 
given fashion points. By night, the 
men heard about permanent value. 
Time for the Sundav show 7 was just 
before Drew Pearson. 

The total number of diamonds lover 
one hundred I sold by the D — A — D 
campaign is a merchandising secret. 
As Bill Bvrd tells Allen Woodall in 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. "Does 
Macy's tell Gimbel's?" 

But Bv rd was so pleased with the 
total that he decided Davison's should 
go into radio advertising strongly. He 
went to the Atlanta office of R. H. 
Macy to tell officials there about his 
new enthusiasm for broadcasting. 

Probabl) this is what the executive 
there told him: "Man. what's the mat- 
tery \ ou been in the sun too long?" 
\t any rate. Byrd returned to Co- 
lumbus without a go-ahead for more 
radio, made up his mind to get more 
facts and figures before selling his su- 
periors. I This kind of thing, incident- 
ly. has come up often in the history of 
broadcasting. It's one of the big rea- 
sons for a promotion effort like 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS, i 

To get his data. Byrd had a secre- 
tary at the store sit down and do noth- 
ing for several days but call up resi- 
dents of Columbus and nearby areas. 
She identified herself as being from a 
radio survey organization and asked if 
the residents knew what D.A.D. meant. 

Better than 85 percent of those 
called knew. 

Armed with this fact. Byrd went 
back to Atlanta, got permission to go 
into radio on a regular basis. In fact. 
Davison central office execs were so 
impressed that they decided to try the 
same campaign in other Georgia towns 
where Davison's has stores. It worked 
well in Macon (WBLMl last December 

Davison's is now in radio heavily. 
The store sponsored a musical quiz 
program (with tough questions and 
valuable prizes) for several months 
this past summer. As much as a thou- 
sand dollars worth of merchandise and 
other items were given away on a sin- 
gle program: it was the biggest quiz 
show Columbus ever had. 

At present Davison's schedule calls 
for one-minute announcements scat- 
tered throughout each day whenever 
there's a sale or some special at the 
store. And it's not only WDAK that 
gets the gravy. Davison's now uses sev- 
eral of the Columbus stations. * * * 



102 



SPONSOR 



Only a 
combination 
of stations 
can cover 
Georgia's 
first three 
markets 




THE TRIO OFFERS 

ADVERTISERS 

AT ONE LOW COST: 

• Concentrated 
coverage 

• Merchandising 
assistance 

Listener loyalty 
built by local 
programming 

• Dealer 
loyalties 

— in Georgia's 
first three 
markets 



Represented, individually and as a group, by 

T, , m. mm m — mm * f± *• |k I f* W I |k| {* New York • Chicago • San Francisco • Dallas 
HE IV A I aL AvEN V 1/ IllVd Atlanta • Detroit • Kansas City • Los Angeles 



30 JANUARY 1950 



103 




Some sales are more profitable than others 




• . • So sell hardest where you sell best! 



NO MATTER WHAT YOU HAVE TO SELL 
ABC COVERS AMERICA'S BEST MARKETS — EFFICIENTLY 



ABC 



N I w l()RK • CHICAGO • DETROIT • LOS ANGELES • SAN' FRANCISCO 



American Broadcasting Company 




104 



SPONSOR 




Film's heaven scene was shot on this set 



8 







Reach the 

40 MILLION 

RADIO LISTENERS 
Who Trade on 

TftcUn Stneet 

AMERICA'S RICHEST MARKET 





The MAIN STREET Market represents 
56% OF ALL RETAIL OUTLETS AND 
43% OF ALL RETAIL SALES 

This is much too big a market for any manufacturer who wants 
sales volume to neglect. The KBC Network reaches this market 
at the local level of "neighborliness" where radio advertising 
is a friendly, believable and responsive buying influence. 
America's brand name manufacturers are becoming more 
keenly aware of these facts every day. May we show you how to 
gain sales volume in this rich market? 

ONLY ONE ORDER REQUIRED FOR ALL OR 
ANY PART OF THIS 385 STATION NETWORK 



KBS is the ONLY established and 

growing Transcription Network 

covering small town and rural 

areas exclusively. 

IN OPERATION SINCE 1940 



LTLWliiaJ 



LMUGllLLt 



JTITfY 



SYSTEM 



fi 




New York 



580 Fifth Avo. 
Phone PLaza 7-1460 



Chicago 



134 N La Salle St. 

Phone STato 2-4590 



106 



SPONSOR 






Ben Franklin motif runs through film 

Benjamin Franklin is the unofficial narrator of LIGHTNING THAI 
TALKS. His voice is heard main times through the film. His hands 
and ornatek laeed sleeves are seen several times. His famous key 
and kite appear. Yet a full view of sage old Ben never appears; sage 
young l 32 I Ren Cradus and others who prepared the film script lilt 
Franklin should remain just out of view of the audience to build up 
a fantas\ effect. The pictures on this page show the various props 
which hint of Franklins presence, \ho\e is the model heaven from 
which Franklin descends. Two pictures I left I show a seamstress pre- 
paring period jacket with lace cuffs; and production men cutting out 
replica ol Franklin kite. Below i- a hand signing Franklin- name. 





STRIKING COINCIDENCE? 



In the history of marketing and merchandising, the brightest 
chapters have been written right here., in America., during 
the last HO years. 




Is it pure coincidence that these 30 years coincide with the 
growth of the radio broadcasting industry? No! 

Kadio has helped tremendously in shaping the course of 
American distribution. Kadio is doing a huge job today. . and 
can do an even lugger job tomorrow. 




To get full benefit from this great and growing medium, count 
mi \\ otin^boiise stations., powerful, popular \oices in -i\ rich 
market-areas. Here you'll find selling experience stemming all 
the way back to the birth of the radio industry. Here, too. you'll 
find programs whose real ratings arc expressed in terms of 
merchandise sold., regardless of figures in listener surveys. 
Where the target is sales, \\ estinghouse stations hit the mark! 




<DKA 


KYW 


WBZ 


WBZA 


wowo 


KEX 


WBZ-TV 


Pittsburgh 


Philadelphia 


Boston 


Springfield 


Fort Wayne 


Portland, Ore. 


Boston 


50,000 Watts 


50,000 Watts 


50.000 Watts 


1,000 Watts 


10,000 Watts 


50,000 Watts 





WESTINGHOUSE IEAMO STATIONS I ne 

National Representatives, Free & Peters, except For WBZ-TV; 
for \\ 15/ TV, NBC Spot Siil.-~ 



108 



SPONSOR 



Three key protluvtion mint at work 




Walter Sachs, film crew production chief, holds slate in front of camera Gene Forrell, the music director, makes sound effects with special mike 
Jean Oser, editor of the movie, smokes without fear (note signs right corner). No danger of fire because new type of safety film was used 




no ■""» " ' 

5 ° 7 
» a S 

26 27 28 



?jPP ^ 



' 



V^ 



DETROITERS 
have the 
money now 





TEN CONTINUOUS YEARS of full employ- 
ment for over a million workers have made 
Detroit America's most prosperous major 
market. With auto manufacturers planning to 
EXCEED last year's record production of 
6,240,400 cars, the 1950 outlook is exceed- 
ingly bright. Looks like another three-billion- 
dollar year for Detroit's retailers! 



~ 



WWJ-TV 
has the 
audience now 




si 



THE 150,000 TV sets now in the Detroit 
market are concentrated within easy range 
of WWJ-T V's strong, clear signal. Lion's share 
of this audience belongs to WWJ-TV, first 
television station in Michigan . . . two years 
ahead of Detroit's other two, in TV know-how 
and programming. 



ADVERTISERS 
are doing the 
business now 




T-m 



1949 WAS A GOOD YEAR for WWJ-TV adver- 
tisers. Naturally, 1950 is proving even bigger. 
Aggressive advertisers seeking increased 
sales in this fabulously wealthy market can 
achieve them through WWJ-TV. 




FIRST IN MICHIGAN 



O^n.d and Optrat.d by THE DETROIT NEWS 



Notional Rmprttmnlolivi: THE GEORGE P. HOILINGBERY COMPANY 
ASSOCIATE AM-FM STATION WWJ 



mujj ^ 



NSC Telvviuon N.fworl 



110 



SPONSOR 




Dramatic shadow picture (above) was taken in the darkened building "clouds." Below are pictures of two down-to-earth figures in the Ail- 
where heaven scenes were filmed. The shadows were cast by Gradus Radio film, the journalism professor and Maurice Mitchell. Microphone 
and Walter Sachs as they consulted on a take behind cheesecloth prof uses is for public address system, not for a broadcast 




30 JANUARY 1950 



111 




CAMERA IN DEPARTMENT STORE (ABOVE); HIDING A MIKE IN TREE; SMILES AFTER THE FIRST PREVIEW OF FILM FOR STAFF 




COMPLETELY LOGO 




30 JANUARY 1950 



113 



announcement: 




transit vehicles 
radio equipped now! 
in big St. Louis 



Other Transit Radio 
Markets 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Washington, D. C. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

lh>n<ton, Texas 

I at "ina, Wash. 

/ vansville, Ind. 

Topcka, Kans. 

Omaha, Neb. 

Des Moines, Jowa 

Worcester, Mass. 

I lit nt own, Pa. 

Huntington, W. Virginia 

Witt, i - Ham . I'n. 

Covington, Ky. 

Bradbury Weights, Md. 

Flint. Michigan 

"Pittsburgh Suburbs, Pa. 



KXOK-PM radio equipped buses aud streetcars 
are now carrying over a million rides per day. 
This great "going to buy" market is served by 
KXOK-FM, Transit Radio in St. Louis. 

Riders enjoy KXOK-FM 's "musie-as-you-ride" 
. . . like the news, sports, and special features . . . 
and act on Transit Radio sales messages. Of 
17 advertising contracts expiring in December, 
1949, 16 advertisers renewed. 94% renewals 
is proof positive of the sales effectiveness of this 
exciting medium. 

Now is the time to discover the power of Transit 
Radio ... a point of purchase medium that has 
proved fast, effective, and economical for 
local and national advertisers. Write, wire 
phone, for details. 




Represented by Transit Radio, Inc. 

NEW YORK 

250 Park A venue 
Murray Bill 8-S780 

CHICAGO 

35 E. W acker Drivi 

Financial 6-4881 



ST. LOUIS— 12th & Delmar, CHestnut 3700 



CINCINNATI 

Union Trust Building 

1> unbar 7775 




LITTLE GIRL DRAWING PAIL OF WATER FROM BACKYARD WELL APPEARS IN PART OF FILM WHICH SHOWS DIVERSITY OF U. S. 




DIVERSITY OF RADIO LISTENERS IS INDICATED IN SCENES WHICH SHOW YOUNG AND OLD LISTENING INDOORS AND OUT 

30 JANUARY 1950 115 



Do you want a superb film at 
significantly lower prices? 

IMPS 



producers in 1949 of 

Lightning That Talks 

for All-Radio Presentation Committee, Inc. 

Television Today 

for the Columbia Broadcasting System 

Career Decision 

for the U. S. Army and U. S. Air Force Recruiting Service 

Around The World With Ford 

for Ford International 

TV SPOTS for BRISTOL-MYERS CO., 
COLUMBIA RECORDS, INC., etc. 



IMPS 



International Movie Producers' Service 

515 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 
Eldorado 5-6620 
Studios: Glen Cove, L. I. 
Cable Address: IMPSERVICE 



116 SPONSOR 







The happy life of a movie-maker: cameramen pull switch and smile (above); Ben Gradus pulls own switch (below), stands in front of eight-ball. 
Man in checked shirt in top picture is Joseph Brun, A.S.C., chief cameraman. He won membership in A.S.C. (movie honor society) recently 




30 JANUARY 1950 



117 



tcVi to* 



&ie 






COST 



sto rY 



WCFL, Chicago 
1000 on Ihe dial 



Represented by the Boiling Company 



118 SPONSOR 








Horrors, what's happened? 

Humorous scenes in film show furniture, 
other objects flying out of journalism 
prof's home. Prof's wife above is regis- 
tering shock. Presumably she is even 
more shocked later on when her clothes 
as well start flying out of the house. 






/.,.. 



/ 




30 JANUARY 1950 



119 



^ ■ I W«l i^ W ^^ 




MMMMMMHI 



# There's a popular outdoor movie place just outside Bloomington, Indiana, on 
state road 37. We never took an actual traffic count past the place, but we know it's 
terrific! And, the screen is visible for hundreds of yards each way from the highway. 

When the movie closed for the winter season it hurt us, no end, to see all that 
screen space going to waste. So, we made arrangements to paint a big WTTS and 
WTTV in the space. 

It just goes to show what extent we go to keep people constantly reminded of 
WTTS and WTTV. 

Ever since WTTS went on the air, we've promoted it heavily, using all kinds of 
promotional plans. The cost sometimes scares us, but we've accomplished what we set 
out to do. We're leading the field. Continuous merchandising — with balanced pro- 
gramming — has set us up in the enviable number one spot in the Bloomington market. 



LET OUR NATIONAL REPS. GIVE YOU THE COMPLETE STORY 



WTTS 

A Regional Station 
on the Air 20 Hours 
a Day. 



RADIO AND TELEVISION CENTER • BLOflMINGTON, INDIANA 1 
Owned and Operated by Sarkes and Mary Tarzian 



WTTV 

Indiana's Second 
TV Station. 



Represented Nationally by 

WILLIAM G. RAMBEAU CO. 

360 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 



National Representatives 
BARNARD & THOMPSON, INC. 
299 Madison Avenue, New York 



120 



SPONSOR 



FACTS THAT TALK 
(Continued from page 11 i 

duction of customers is one of tin 
greatest of all American inventions! 



America's markel place has nevei 

before been so nimli oi a challenge — 
a market really worth competing for. 
Basic figures (in billions! look I ik<- 
this: 





1929 


1948 


U.S. National Income 


87 


226 


U.S. Spendable Income 


82 


194.f 


Personal Consumption 






Expenditures 


79 


1 78. 1 



This is the most significant part of 
the story to business men. to advertis- 
ers: In 1935 five-sixths of I .S. fami- 
lies had incomes under $2,000 a year 
— 84// . Ten years later more than 
half of U.S. families had incomes over 
52.000 — 57%. In the same period 
families with incomes of $5,000 and 
over increased 455' '.■'<. Families with 
incomes between $3,000 and $5,000 in- 
creased 455%. In the $2,000-$3,000 
bracket the number of families in- 
creased 150' « . 



In L936 the percent of U.S. families 
with incomes above "subsistence lev- 
els'" was onl\ 26.7' < . Their total non- 
subsistence spending was $21.1 bil- 
lions in that prewar year. 

By 1950 the 26.7% of families with 
incomes above subsistence levels had 
jumped to 62' , . and their total non- 
subsistence spending was $54.0 bil- 
lions — a big pie to cut. 



The people who make these figures 
have not only raised their standard of 
living enormously since the people of 
Ben Franklin's day. Their choice of 
kinds and brands of goods, even since 
1920, has increased amazingly. All 
ibis means that American business is 
geared to making its profits on volume 
not on price. 



I he key sales problem is to reach as 
man\ different families as possible, as 
cheaply as possible. In the late 30's, 
509? °f all new automobiles were 
bought by families with incomes under 
$2,000 a year — as was most of the soap 
and foods and watches and all other 
advertised goods. That was because 
80', of American families had in- 
comes under $2,000 a year; there 
weren't enough "rich" families to pro- 
duce volume sales! 



This is the widening oj the markel 
place that keeps our mills and factories 
and transportation systems busy, <au 
rctml system spreading widei and 
deeper into the coun'r". 

The Voice 0/ The Markot Placi 

\\ bat is advertising, anyway? It is 
selling at a distance . . . selling people 
1 efore the) gel to the store . . . bring- 
ing them into the store. Advertising 

reache- out to people and turn- them 

into customers wherever the people are. 




\\u\ a> the market- get bigger, ad- 
vertising becomes more and more prof- 
itable to business. As markets get more 
competitive, advertising becomes more 
and more essentitd to business. 



Competition is the prime mover. Of 

this fact top management is quite 
aware, even when it does not have a 
strong sense of advertising I this often 
happens because top management so 
frequent!) has its roots in production 
and finance rather than in sales I . 



Where does the primary power of 

advertising come from? Win. from 
the people themselves. Our greatest 
characteristic, stemming right out of 
our democracy, is to want something 
better. Better jobs, better food, better 
home furnishings, better services. 



Everybody wants them, not just a 
chosen few. And advertising sells to 
everybody! People set the objective. 
Advertising tells them how they can 
achieve it: what to get. where to get it. 
It is sometimes objected that advertis- 
ing makes people buy goods they don't 
uant or need. But when the product is 
sampled, the product takes over, large- 
ly. The second sale depends mainly on 
the product, and it is the second sale 
that males the profits! 



Advertising appeals most to people 
who are most prone to tr\ something 
new and better. It sells them. Then 
the\. to an important degree, help to 
sell their neighbors. 



Advertising pick- out the "class mar- 
ket" of America in even income le\el. 
These most resDonsive people listen 
most to radio! Radio, more than any 
other medium, covers advertisings 
"'class market" up and down the in- 
come-scale. The three (halt- aC< "in 
paining this feature illustrate this in 



To SELL the PEOPLE Who Buy 



The MOST in the ^ ) I U 



B 




$# 



POPULATION 
Over 4 Million 

RETAIL SALES 
Over 2 Billion 



«s« 



o*«-^g* 









°°° WATTS 0MAHft!*!liii 



FREE and PETERS 
Representatives 



HARRY BURKE 
Gen'l Manager 



Another 

FIRST 

ForKDYL-TV 

Afternoon programming 

aimed at women 

l naturally) 

marks another important 

"first" for Salt Lake's 

first TV station. 

Availabilities 

during this 

3 to 5 p.m. period 

are unusually 

attractive. 



,^r^> 



Salt Lake City. Utoh 
National Repreientotive John Bloir & Co. 



30 JANUARY 1950 



121 



"Imitation is the 
sincere st form of flattery " 



SPONSOR is the most 



imitated advertising 



trade publication 



today. 




510 MADISON AVENUE 

NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK 



part. Additional data to come will fur- 
ther document this fact. 



Advertising's Role Varies 

Advertising plays less of a role in 
the sale of an automohile than of a 
cake of soap. That's why an automo- 
bile manufacturer can be very ineffi- 
cient in his use of media and still stay 
in business. Why he can, for exam- 
ple, concentrate his advertising on 
"class" markets instead of "mass mar- 
kets," even though his sales depend on 
mass-market purchases. 



If a soap company made such a basic 
mistake in its media strategy (when its 
competitors did not), it would instant- 
ly head for the rocks. 

Yet advertising plays an essential 
role in the sale of an automobile as 
well as of soap. Items of frequent con- 
sumption, generally low-cost and 
bought often by lots of people com- 
mands heaviest advertising, it is true. 
Yet even products of less frequent con- 
sumption, and far more cost, depend 
on volume of sales for their profits. 

Because they are not high frequency 
purchases advertising plays a highly 
significant role. An automobile com- 
pany can sell a new car to a family 
normally only once in two or three 
years. If it wants to sell more cars that 
year it must reach more families. 



When a soap company makes a cus- 
tomer through advertising, it continues 
to get profit out of repeat sales to that 
customer. But when an automobile 
company makes a customer, it loses 
him for that year, and the next and the 
next. Similarly for refrigerators, 
watches, silverware, life insurance, etc. 
The only way they can maintain their 
volume of sales is to reach lots of dif- 
ferent families. 



People don't make snap decisions 
about an "important" product that 
isn't bought very often. There is usu- 
ally a long "incubation period." (Three 
months, it is estimated, for an auto- 
mobile.) Advertising can tell the spon- 
sor's story over and over until a final 
decision is made to buv. 



Formal advertising isn't as good in 
some ways as the informal variety. It 
isn't spontaneous; it is more imper- 
sonal. But in some wavs it is better. 



It is uniform comment. It is simul- 
taneous, authoritative comment. It is 
controlled comment. It is widespread. 



It gets people to know about a product 
just the way the manufacturer wants 
them to hear about it. 



Advertising's Steady Pressure 

Advertising isn't a buttonhole grab- 
ber. It soaks. One advertising impact 
tends to be like one drop of water. It's 
the steady pressure that makes it most 
effective in finally building impulses 
into action. 



Conscious, half-conscious, quarter- 
conscious . . . advertising doesn't work 
only by its conscious effect on people. 
Very often, a person doesn't know just 
why he buys a particular brand of 
goods. His purchase is the sum total 
of all the influences on him. 



This has been demonstrated, to some 
degree, in surveys which have shown 
that people who "don't know" the prod- 
uct advertised in a radio program — 
yet who do listen to the program — are 
generally found to be significantly 
greater users of the product than non- 
listeners to the same program. 



They "didn't know" what was being 
advertised. But the program got them 
to buy the product just the same! 



How Does Advertising Work? 

Ben Franklin would be fascinated 
with the media through which adver- 
tising exerts its force today. One of 
them, he would find, is the biggest 
thing in all America, except for the 
people themselves : 94% of the Amer- 
ican people own and use radios. 



The older indices of the American 
way of life, the automobile, the movies, 
the telephone, the plumbing — none of 
them are so characteristic of America 
today as radio: 94% as big as the 
United States itself. 



It is interesting to note that any ad- 
vertising medium — radio, newspapers, 
magazines — is a product, bought and 
sold in the open market place against 
competition like any of the products 
it sells to readers or listeners. 



The distribution it gets depends on 
its own "product appeal." on how suc- 
cessful a product it is. 



The distribution it gives depends on 
the same thing. The distribution of 
its advertising messages depends on the 
"product appeal" of the medium, not 
of the product it is helping to sell. 



FOR NEW YORK'S 

THIRD GREAT 

MARKET 

ALBANY 

TROY 

SCHENECTADY 

• WROW offer, 

• YOU complete 

• COVERAGE and 

• PROMOTION and 

• SERVICE 

5000 Watis • 590 K.C. 

Ask 
THE BOLLINC COMPANY 



WW 

BASIC MUTUAL 



LIKE 

A 

PARROT- 

— the joe 
in the know 
in LA. radio 

SAYS: 

Montis ten tfy JW, 

GREATER RETURNS^jlT 

per 



S0- 



LMeck 



1020 
KC 



KFVD 



5000 
Watts 



LOS ANGELES 
— BEFORE YOU BUY! 



30 JANUARY 1950 



123 



When you can get RCA 

"Know-How". . .why 

take anything less? 




^# 



<$> 



#0^ 



*{P 



>#" 



RECORDING 

PROCESSING 

PRESSING 



Y 



ou get the kind of serv- 
ice you want and the quality 
you need at RCA ! Records 
and transcriptions of every 
description . . . slide film and 
promotion recording facil- 
ities. Careful handling and 
prompt delivery. Contact an 
RCA Victor Custom Record 
Sales Studio: 

120 East 23rd Street 
New York 10, New York 

MU 9-0500 

445 North Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago 1 1, Illinois 

Whitehall 4-2900 

1016 North Sycamore Avenue 

Hollywood 38, California 

Hillside 5171 

You'll find useful facts in 

our Custom Record Brochure. 

Send for it today! 



custom 
(^record 
sales 



tffo 



Radio Corporation of America 
RCA Victor Division 



7 hat s why it is so important to an 
advertiser to pick a medium whose 
"product appeal" is as good or better 
than the appeal he wants his on n prod- 
uct to generate. 



Radio is a solvent that has largely 
dissolved the old division* between 
markets, the "class" and "mass" dis- 
tinctions that are so exaggerated by 
more limited media. People are wiping 
them out in their purchasing habits. 



Radio Ownership 

There are now 40.000.000 U.S. radio 
families: 

94' < of U.S. families own radios 
05' < have bathtubs 
60% have automobiles 
52' < have telephones 



Saturation everywhere but in the 
South : 

98% ownership in Northeastern 

U.S. 
95'; in North Central 
07 ', in the West 
87% in the South I all the families 

with money!) 



Saturation everywhere but on the 
farm: 

96%) ownership in cities over 

500,000 
96% in cities 100,000 to 500.000 
95% in cities 25.000 to 100.000 
95% in cities 2.500 to 25.000 
93% in rural non-farm homes 
85/4 in farm homes (but all farm- 
ers with money ) 



Not much difference bv income lev- 
els, but with the emphasis on high in- 
comes : 

98'/' <>f the "top third in income 
have radios 

07', of the "middle third" 

86% of the "low third" 

Only the poorest farmers, mostly in 
the South, don't own radios. 



Some Interlocking Markets 

Socially and statistically, the Amer- 
ican family has long labelled itself by 
its possession of an automobile and a 
telephone. People who own one or 
both are the prime markets for all na- 
tionally advertised goods. Note how 
thoroughly radio saturates markets: 



05.7' < of all urban telephone home? 
could be reached by radio. 
I lie same saturation figures hold to- 
dav for families with refrigerators, 
washing machines, etc. Radio delivers 
the complete market. 



As early as 1037 . . . 

959* of all urban automobile homes 
could be reached bv radio . . . 



Other media, magazines particularly . 
are fond of pointing out that "90% of 
our circulation owns an automobile, 
and so forth." 



Hut this i- a very different story than 
tadio. which can sav that "'95% of all 
urban automobile families can be 
reai bed bv radio. 



Magazines reach splinters of these 
markets. Radio reaches the whole 
market through the I . S. 



Multiple Set Growth 

Between 1014 and 1947 the U. S. 
families with more than one set almost 
doubled: 18', in 1944. 34% in 1947. 



Automobile sets climbed from 4.- 
500.000 in 1937 to 0.300,000 in 194U. 
This multiple-set ownership is another 
indication of something not often em- 
phasized: radios saturation of the 
upper-income markets. 



Radios virtual saturation of all in- 
come levels often obscures the demon- 
strated fact that radio first appeals to 
families with money. In 1930. when 
onlv 40.3/4 of I . S. homes had radios, 
there were sets in: 

7!!', of all \ \ homes I income ovei 

$10,000) 
73.7', of all A homes ($5,000 to 

10.000) 
66.8$ of all BB homes ($3,000 to 

5.001 1 1 
54.2', of all B homes ($2,000 to 
3.000 I 



In 1033. when 56.2% of all I .S. 
homes had radios there were radios 
in : 

!!7.J!' , of all A A homes 

<">5.7' , of all A homes 

80.79! of all BB homes 

72.0', of all B homes 

57.89J of all C homes I $1,000 to 
2.000 I 



Why Is Radio So Effective? 

\ clue: at Deshon General Hospital, 
the 1 .S. \rinv asked a group of blind 
and deaf veterans which of the two 
senses the) would sooner have restored. 
if thev could have onlv one. 



124 



SPONSOR 



HOW FAR CM JARO HESS GO? 




He's gone too far already, say 
some. There's the station manager in 
North Carolina who wrote that 
he got so steamed up looking at the represen- 
tation of the "Station Manager** 
that the print hurst into flame. And the 
New York radio direetor who 
locked his eopy of the "Account Execu- 
tive** in his desk hecause one of the 
agency account hig-wigs "was kind 
of sensitive.'* So it's wise to calculate the 
risk before decorating your office with 
these five provocative, radio-rihbing. 
Jaro Hess drawings. They're 
12" x 15", reproduced on top-quality 
enamel stock, ideal for framing. 



Betides the Sponsor there's the Timebuyer, the Station 
Manager, the Account Executive, the Radio Director. 
While our supply lasts the sat is yours — free with your 
subscription to SPONSOR. Write to SPONSOR, 510 
Madison Ave., New York 22. 



FREE, with your subscription to SPONSOR 



($8.00 per year) 



L 



If you think the sponsor is out-of-thi>- 
uorld. then wait 'til you see the four 
others. Jaro Hess caricatures are 
available only with your subscrip- 
tion to SPONSOR. Extra sets, avail- 
able to subscribers, at $4.00 each. 



J 



"I am 100% satisfied with 
your excellent caricature titled 
Sponsor never satisfied." 

The Toni Company 
Don P. Nathanson 



"It's a good thing advertising 
men don't bruise easily because 
these jaro Hess satires really rib 
the business." 

Louis C. Pedlar, Jr. 
Cahn Mille/ Inc. 



"The pictures by Jaro Hess 
are splendid and I'm delighted 
to have them." 

Niles Trammell 
NBC 



"During each busy day I make 
it a point to look at them just 
once. They always bring a smile 
and relieve tension." 

Dick Gilbert 
KRUX 



QrSi>. 




Eighty percent said they would 
sooner hear again. 



OVER 230,000 
POPULATION 

Largest population 

market in Illinois and 
fowa, outside Chicago. 
Family income tops 
$5,650 per year. 
Farm machinery manu- 
facturing center of the 
nation. 

Delivering more listeners 
at a lower cost . . . 






WHBF 

5000 Watts Basic ABC 
AM • FM • TV 



National Representatives . . Avery Knodel, Inc. 



^ClU 



Are YOU being misled about 

NORFOLK??. 7 

Getting most for your dollars 

in VIRGINIA'S NO. 1 

MARKET? 

Better double check your 
schedule NOW for this pros- 
perous, booming area! 

and get set for 

BIG NEWS IN NORFOLK 
RADIO 

in 1950! 

ASK RA-TEL .... 
about 



M 



WSAP 



M 



Serving 

NORFOLK — PORTSMOUTH 

NEWPORT NEWS 

From 

Portsmouth 

MUTUAL NETWORK 

B. Waller Huffinfcilon, General Mgr. 



A moments contemplation suggests 
why. They felt more "cut-off" from 
people, more lonely, when they couldn t 
hear human \oices than when they 
couldn't see human faces. 



radio runs away from the field. 



Merely to look at a person is to see 
only the outside ... to hear someone 
speak is to get a message from within. 
is to establish a deep contact with an- 
other personality. More than sight of 
other people, more than the written 
word, the sound of other people talk- 
ing brings people together. 



We respond more to speech than to 
the written word. This is one of the 
great roots of radio's power. 



One Month's Audience 

In a month, a top radio program 
will be heard by 50% of all the adults 
in the U.S.; the vast majority of them 
hearing it two or three times in the 
month. Consider the "Lux Theatre of 
the Air," for which listening data is 
available, as of January, 1940: 

48.8 r ; of all U.S. people over 18 
heard it in a month 

55. 1 ' '< of all people with some col- 
lege education 

r>(>.2' '< of all people with some high- 
school education 

34.2 '/( of all people without high- 
school education 

47.6% of all A income people 

54.1% of all B income 

52.1 % of all C income 

40.4% of all D income 
This is for one program, not for a 
schedule of programs. 



Inherent Selling Qualities 

Sales come out of impact, not out of 
geograpln. Not alone "how many," 
but "how hard you hit 'em" is the 
truer measure of success for any ad- 
vertising medium. Despite radio's 
astonishing horizontal stretch ("how 
many") , it is the vertical impact — "how 
hard you hit 'em" — that forms radio's 
bedrock of value to advertisers. 



Radio's "great numbers" are the re- 
sult of its impact, both in programing 
and advertising, not the cause of it. 
An advertising medium must be judged 
by this equation: Sales value equals 
circulation times frequency times im- 
pact. It is in the powerful combination 
of these three elements, each increas- 
ing the value of the oilier two. that 



The Living Voice 

Every salesman, politician, and dic- 
tator knoivs that what Pliny, the 
lounger, said over 1,800 years ago is 
true today: "We are more affected by 
ivords we hear, for though ivhat we 
read in books may be more pointed, 
there is something about the voice that 
makes a deeper impression on the 
mind." 



People read alone. But thev listen 
together. Each person tends to a 
greater response because response is 
infectious. Any automobile or insur- 
ance salesman would much rather sell 
a husband and a wife at the same time 
than tr\ to sell each one individually. 



Radio's Pictures 

Radio has pictures, of course — the 
pictures people paint in their own 
minds. They are the greatest adver- 
tising illustrations in the world. 



More Personalized, Provocative 

Radio pictures are more personalized 
and provocative because they are not 



and SELL 

Southern California' 

TOP 

QUARTER 
MILLION 

withKFMV(FM) 

58,000 Worn 94.7 mc. 



p„o»W'<>'* e 
listen^ "" 



_ HON BIOAOCASTiNG COIPOKAtlON 

6540 Sunset Blvd., 
Hollywood 28, California 

V / / 



126 



SPONSOR 



limited by the details of printed pic- 
tures, which tend to freeze the imagi- 
nation to specific details shown. The 
Clairol Co. found this out in a maga- 
zine campaign for a woman's hair 
shampoo preparation. 



The black and white campaign was 
so successful it "progressed" to four- 
color illustration. Sales effectiveness 
immediately dropped off. They found 
out that a woman looking at a black 
and white illustration could more 
easily identify herself with the picture, 
whether she was blonde, brunette, or 
red-head. Any color used in the illus- 
tration which differed from the hair 
color of a reader made it harder for 
her to identify herself with the picture! 



The history of the Toni Company, 
which had spectacular success in sell- 
ing home permanent wave kits, is al- 
most entirely a radio success story, ft 
showed the other side of the coin : how 
effectively radio's '"pictures" get wom- 
en to buv ! 



Message and Program Linked 

In space advertising the magazine or 
the newspaper gets the credit for the 
information and entertainment in its 
columns. In radio, it's the sponsor 
who gets it. It is "The Lux Theatre of 
the Air."' Or Eversharp brings you 
"Take It or Leave It." etc. Sponsors 
have an element of audience good-will 
that is without parallel in space media. 



Only in radio can the advertiser 
make a sharp pre-selection of the edi- 
torial frame and mood that will sur- 
round his sales message. In radio, the 
product gets its own frame — built to 
order in every case! 



/// radio there is no competition 

from editorial content, because the ad- 
vertiser controls the editorial content 
which surrounds his sales message. 

Sales Talk Gets Spotlight 

Once the audience is collected and 
entertained and the time has come to 
sell, the program is removed, taken off 
the stage . . . only the sales message is 
there . . . the only thing on the stage. 
This is of great importance to adver- 
tising. Instead of the prospect's having 
to exert himself to focus first on edi- 
torial, then advertising content, radio 
does it for him. Its easier for the 
listener to hear the sales message than 
to avoid it! 



Service-Ads go to 
client meetings 



with Radio Director 




"STANDARD RATE's Radio Section is always 
with me," says the R. D. of one large agency. 
"Even when I go to talk with clients I put it in 
my briefcase. It gives me all — and I mean all — 
the basic quantitative information I need on 
any station, except coverage. And I welcome 
ads in it that tell me something that the station 
listings don't tell, such as coverage information. 
Such ads are useful." 

You, too, have probably noticed that many sta- 
tions are supplementing their SRDS listings with 
Service-Ads* that give additional buying infor- 
mation, like WCFL's Service-Ad shown here. 
Note to Station Managers: The SPOT RADIO 
PROMOTION HANDBOOK reports the sort 
of station information time buyers say they 
want. It's full of promotion ideas. Copies are 
available from us at a dollar each. 



•SERVICE IDS 

are ads that sup- 
plement and ex- 
pand SUDS liv- 
ings with useful 
Information that 
h<*lps buyers buy. 




^L 



wen. iow 



S0.000 WITTS IN CHICAGO 

sells ' l+" stnes-l.2M.Kl oneaets 
b Hi ■jnni...i.42l.l20 in setntot)' 






• >>i ft i It. piocruBBlM tnckn an *u4 
• I .'•II p*Mrin J 
JunW 101. halm .«(-*■ 



M.US ft' M 



I : K. =.<**, Sown TV-4. )*]<* . 
. ...-.-.Jbru.tlwtl.ilinl.nlJ 

■ ujH|Nmn n.ifc* |-,w.».if. 



A. iW row. «/ UUr in I Jutun. 




For your convenience WCFL runs 
such Service-Ads* as this near 
their listing in SRDS Radio Section. 



Inc 



f STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE, 

The National Authority Serving the Media Buying Function 

Walter E. Botthof, Publisher 

333 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO I, ILLINOIS 

NEW YORK • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES 



> 



RADIO 

. . . sitwe its com m erciul Infancy 

TELEVISION 

. . . since 1939 



i*vi*v**v It. Nelson. Inc*, 

A tlwrt is iitcj 

Seheneetadv and New York Citv 



30 JANUARY 1950 



127 




Man with a mission 

Even a trade publication if? entitled 
l" an occasional lapse. 

Ben Gradus is neither an advertiser 
nor an agency executive. And sponsor 
rarely writes about any others. 

Hut this is sponsor's lapse. For non- 
sponsor Gradus is worth writing ahou'. 

Hen Gradus is director of LIGHT- 
\I\G THAT TALKS. As such, he 
could have satisfied himself with a 
good film. 

Yet Gradus decided that nothing 
would do hut perfection. 

The normal 45-minute commercial 
film uses 20.0(H) feet of film. Gradus 
shot 50.000. 

I he normal commercial film is shot 
within the confines of a single area. 
Gradus and his hard\ crew traveled 
25,000 miles. 

Gradus insisted on naturalness. So 
everywhere he went he selected and 
trained non-professional actors suit- 
ahly linked to the locale. Everywhere 
he went he taught babies, teenagers, 
housewives, octogenarians to perform 
• •reditahlv in their real-life roles. 

II. after seeing LIGHTNING THAT 



I \1.K>. \ou consider it something spe- 
cial. \ou may want to remember that 
there was something special behind it. 
Gradus was a man with a mission. 

How to sell an advertiser 

LIGHTNING III VT TALKS repre- 
sents a serious attempt h\ broadcasters 
to bring advertisers national, re- 
gional, and local — face to face with 
ke\ fads about iheir medium. 

Such a presentation is long past due. 
For years advertisers have been ham- 
pered 1>\ a lack of understanding of 
the advertising importance, impact, 
and versatility of radio. Nobodv gave 
it to them, except in dribs and drabs. 

For lack of such a presentation mil- 
lions were lost to broadcasters. 

The shoe-merchant who was burnt 
bv radio advertising after using three 
announcements back in 1932 never 
came back. The newspaper boys told 
him why he shouldn't. The radio boys 
never convinced him he should. 

The large automotive manufacturer 
who invests huge sums in every form 
of advertising, except radio, might 
quickly have changed his mind if he 
had been given the wherewithal to 
recognize that the persuasiveness of ra- 
dio — its intense human appeal — works 
just as well for autos as it does for 
soaps and cigarettes. This industrial- 
ist is too busy to give much time to 
consideration of specific advertising 
problems. But little bv little he picks 
up an appreciation of media. Radio 
was one that didn't get through to him. 

The department store with the radio 
taboo certainly would take a longer 
look if its owners knew the basic di- 
rect-selling jobs that Schuneman's in 
St. Haul. ZGMI in Salt Lake City. 
Polsky's in Akron, and other progres- 
sive stores assign to radio — and with 
what effect. 

LIGHTNING THAT TALKS will 
guarantee an initial interest . . . and at 



least the beginning of appreciation of 
radio by thousands of advertisers who 
had none before. 

But SPONSOR hopes that what this 
unique doeumentarv develops will be 
only a start. Now comes the real work. 

It's up to broadcasters to follow with 
individual showings of the film, per- 
haps in its briefer versions: by per- 
sonal solicitation: by well-planned 
presentations pinpointing radios place 
in the advertiser's scheme of things. 

We recommend that this Souvenir 
Issue of sponsor, prepared as a facts 
and figures supplement to the film, be 
used to the fullest. 

The forces that bring about as im- 
portant a presentation as LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS augur well for the fu- 
ture sales aggressiveness of radio. 
Radio is a great medium . . . and it will 
be greater for remembering that there's 
no substitute for constructive selling. 

How to see the film 

The word is spreading that radio 
has something in LIGHTNING THAT 
TALKS. During the past week or two 
inquiries have been received at SPON- 
SOR from advertisers and agencv execu- 
tives who want to see the film and 
wonder how that can be arranged. 

On page 42 of this issue is a story 
describing the industry's plans for 
showing the film to sponsors, prospec- 
tive sponsors, and advertising agency- 
personnel. As sponsor went to press 
the dates of area showings were not 
sufficiently defined to be published. 
These will be released bv the HAH. 

Stations in your own area will be 
glad to provide further information on 
-bowings, sponsor will be happv to 
answer questions and to dig up an) 
data available on dates of showings in 
specific areas. The BAB office. 270 
Hark \venue. New York City, is ading 
,i- clearing house for showing dates. 



Applause 



Awareness of radio: 1950 

Long before the first showing of 

LIGHTNING THAT rALKS, national commercial vitality of the mosl exten- 

and local advertiser- and agenc) execu- s j V( . advertising medium available. 

lives were asking when and where they ], ,»xnresses the urgent need for 



sents several things. It represents a basic interest in all 

It indicates a keen awareness of advertising, and a deep desire on the 

radio: 1050 variety. It reveals the part of advertisers to place the several 



might see the film. 



It expresses 

radio presentation material that will 
Man) such queries came to sponsor, help advertisers appreciate the impor- 
To u- this wave of interest repre- lance of the medium. 



mediums in their proper perspectives. 

LIGHTNING THAT TALKS will 
contribute substantiallv to a better un- 
derstanding of radio. 

SPONSOR is pleased to note the wide- 
spread receptivity to its message. 



128 



SPONSOR 





ROPED! 
TIED L^ < ^^?_ il t ^ 
READY FOR BRANDING ! 



That's the breezy Arizona way of telling 
you that more than 

HALF A MILLION ARIZONANS 

who, annually, spend more than 

HALF A BILLION DOLLARS 

in KOOL's retail trading area provide a 
ready-made, loyal audience 

for YOUR SALES MESSAGE 

— made doubly responsive by KOOL's 
active showmanship and local promotion 

"f" the consistently top-Hooperated 

COLUMBIA NETWORK PROGRAMMING 




Key Station of the 

Radio Network of Arizona. 

KOOL, Phoenix 
KCKY, Coolidge 
KOPO, Tucson 

100% coverage of Arizona's 
richest area comprising 75% 
of the State's population. 



Your COLUMBIA Station 



IN ARIZONA 



5,000 WATTS DAY and NIGHT 960 KCs 

Phone, wire or write for availabilities today 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

George P. Hoi I ingberry Co. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • ATLANTA 



Makes You 
Stronger! 






The right kind of food builds you up. 
And so does Radio Sales research. 

Take the case of the food spon- 
sor who wanted to be stronger in 
Intermountain America. A Radio 
Sales Account Executive — bar 
by the most resourceful research 
department in spot radio— sho 
him how he could get 3 times as many 
listeners at less than one-third the 
cost-per-thousand. By switching 
KSL in Salt Lake City. So he < 

You, too, can make your adver- 
tising so powerful it'll pick up extra- 
heavy profits ... in 13 of your most 
important markets. Just call . . . 



Television Statio 

Representing wets, wt wrva, wbt 

KMOX.WBB.v WBTV, 

WAM-TV, K8L-TV, KTTv and the Columbia Pacific Network. 











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V -; 




!► 








twg, ' 







r 



V-i . 



mm 

IB 






3 FEBRUARY 1950 • $8.00 a Year 




Out 



Spot, network, 
or both? -p. 17 



Monica Lewis is Chiquita number 3 — page 20 



ChaH^T 

Wilson 

■ 

pag. 14 












Dictionary 

page 22 




m 

i 



Sponsor 
Speaks 

page 



64 



Applause 

page 64 





WHAS-TV . . soon on the air . . . will be represented 
nationally by Edward Petry and Company. 

Petry has represented WHAS since 1933. 



MAS TV 




VICTOR A SHOLIS, Direcfor 



NEIL D. CLINE, Soles Diretfor 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE COURIER JOURNAL & LOUISVILLE TIMES • AFFILIATE OF THE CBS TELEVISION NETWOR 




TS... SPONSOR REPORTS.. 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



Tide promoted as 

non-rinse detergent 

after Surf's lead 



Will station experts 
pool talents? 



Son helps hypo 
Crosby's Hooperating 



BMB's second study 

reveals in-town 

station gains 



Railroad execs 

interested in 

TV advertising 



Networks expand 

sales research 

facilities 



Transit radio 

gathers proof 

of results 



13 February 1950 

P&G's Tide, previously advertised without any non-rinse attribute, is 
now being sold nationally as a non-rinse detergent. Idea was first 
used by Lever Brothers* Surf and in three major cities. Sales 
equalled Rinso's one month after inception of advertising. Lever is 
producing Surf in limited quantities; Tide is being manufactured for 
national distribution. 

-SR- 

Election of Vic Diehm, veteran broadcaster-owner of WAZL, Hazleton, 
Pa., to vice-presidency and directorship of WHOL, Allentown, Pa., 
indicates possible trend toward pooling of station know-how in grow- 
ing competitive era. With too many stations in practically every 
market, it's survival of the fittest. 

-SR- 

When Bing Crosby's youngster appeared on his show 18 January, he gave 
papa's rating a boost. In the 17-24 January poll, Bing jumped from 
seventh place to third. Jack Benny, without offspring but with wife, 
continues to hold top position. 

-SR- 

Study number two, released early in February, points up gains by in- 
town stations. BMB headquarters' services are available to adver- 
tisers and agencies in analyzing and processing BMB material. (See 
page 26. ) 

-SR- 

Successful use of TV by Santa Fe has been a source of encouragement 
to other railroad companies. Most of 90 RR ad managers attending 
annual conference in Chicago expressed definite interest in 
television. 

-SR- 

Both NBC and CBS are gearing for more intensive sales efforts with 
expanded sales planning and research operations. George Wallace 
heads new four-division NBC radio set-up dealing with sales planning 
and presentations. He will work closely with Harry Kopf , vice- 
president in charge of sales. At CBS E. P. J. Shurick, formerly with 
Free & Peters, will move into network sales research under super- 
vision of John Karol, sales director. 

-SR- 

Transit radio is compiling numerous examples of outstanding results 
for national and local advertisers. Antagonism to newest radio 
medium stems mainly from printed media sources anxious to stifle a 
growing competitive threat. 



sriiNsiilt \ I un, I Xii I 13 I ! 150. Published biweekly for SPONSOR Publications I LO Elm Ave., Baltimore 11. Mil. Executive, Editorial. Circulation Office 

! " Madison lv< New York ■>•!. ?S ;i year in V. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered a- secid elass matter J!i January 1919 at Baltimore. Md postofflce under Act 3 March 1879. 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR R 



Negro disc jockeys 
number over 80 



1950 looms as big 
year for spot 



Co I gate -Pa I mo live - 

Peet buys fifth 

African program 



Lever Brothers to 

spend $2,500,000 

for TV in '50 



Miles antihistamine 

candidate sponsors 

three net shows 



NBC's "Saturday 

Night" Big 

Business 



$200,000 for 
Phonevision films 



Croup stations 

establishing 

New York 

sales offices 



Newly compiled list of Negro disc jockeys shows rapid increase in 
programing for colored audiences. Earlier list contained less than 
50 names ; new one has more than 80. 

-SR- 

Early forecasts of increasing use of spot radio in 1950 are material- 
izing. Responsible spot sources report substantial increase in 
January spot radio advertising over previous year, with new auto and 
anti-histamine announcements leading the parade. During early 
February trend continuing. Medium's flexibility is appealing factor 
in face of changing conditions. 

-SR- 

Colgate continues to make effective use of radio in foreign markets. 
Company has bought fifth South African program: "King Cole Court," 
15-minute transcribed musical. Programs and spots give Colgate 
national coverage in South Africa. 

-SR- 

Lever Brothers will allocate $2,500,000 for television advertising in 
1953. Money is to be added to annual ad budget. Allocations for 
other media will not be reduced to include new medium. P&G has 
appropriated $1,500,000 for TV on an experimental basis. 

-SR- 

Miles Laboratories anti-histamine product Tabcin is being plugged on 
three network shows: "Edwin C. Hill"; "One Man's Family"; "Ladies 
Fair." Tabcin is advertised on 11 broadcasts a week. Two of pro- 
grams are on Monday-Friday. 

-SR- 

NBC's 2'/2 hour Saturday night TV stint looms as a $4,560,000 annual 
business. That's gross takes when "Saturday night" is sold solid to 
15 advertisers. Cost to each is about 35 percent of weekly full page 
schedule in LIFE. Twenty-two stations will be included in network. 
Program starts mid February. 

-SR- 

Boost for E. F. McDonald's (Zenith) Phonevision, prior to FCC ap- 
proval of pay-as-you-use telephone-TV system, is decision of movie- 
maker James A. FitzPatrick to spend $200,000 of his frozen European 
funds making two-reel Phonevision subjects on Continent. Fitz- 
Patrick plans production in March if FCC okays system. 

-SR- 

Westinghouse Radio Stations is new3St group to establish sales office 
in New York. Eldon Campbell, sales iranager of Kex, Portland, is 
National Sales Coordinator starting 15 February. Two years ago Fort 
Industry Stations opened similar New York office with Tom Harker in 
charge, and Fort Industry success is setting pattern. New York sales 
offices work closely with national representatives. 

—please turn to page 34— 

SPONSOR 



THE 



OUT-OF-HOME 

RADIO AUDIENCE 



• • 



is important 
in Winter as well as Summer 



The Second Report on OUT- OF -HOME 
radio listening in New York, just released, 
clearly establishes the stability of the OUT- 
OF-HOME audience. It was almost as large 
in November, when this study was conducted, 
as it was in August, the period covered in 
The First Report. 

The constancy of this audience, as well 
as its vast size — one out of every two New 
York families had members listening to the 
radio OUT-OF-HOME daily in November — 
further emphasizes the common sense of 
radio's counting its entire house, AT-HOME 
and OUT-OF-HOME listeners. 

The Second Report makes this TOTAL 
count a practical reality. For the first time 
ratings are now available for OUT-OF- 
HOME listening by Vi-hours from 6 a.m. to 
12 midnight, exactly as in the standard 



monthly AT-HOME rating studies. These 
OUT-OF-HOME figures can legitimately be 
combined with the AT-HOME ratings to 
determine the TOTAL radio audience by 
stations for any Vi-hour. Both surveys are bv 
PULSE, conducted simultaneously and using 
the same sample. 

There are vital facts for radio time 
buyers and advertisers in The Second Report. 
OUT-OF-HOME listening habits do not 
always conform with AT-HOME radio pref- 
erences. Certain times and certain programs 
are greatly enhanced in value, while others 
benefit little. Every time period needs to be 
re --evaluated! 

A limited supply of "The Second Report" 
is available. Write for it to WNEW, 565 
Fifth Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. Or ask 
a WNEW representative for a copy. 



Represented 
by John Blair & Co 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 





Vol. 4 no. 4 



13 February 1950 




l. FEATURES 



Sponsor Iteports 

510 tfaffi.voti Ave. 

Outlook 

\ew «nrf Renew 



fir. Sponsor: 

€'harles F. Wilson 



P.S. 

fir. Sponsor Asks 
TV Results 
.Sponsor Speaks 
Applause 



I 

a 

8 

n 

14 
15 

36 
:t:t 
64 
64 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Frank M. Bannister, Ellen Davis, 
Irving Marder 

Assistant Editors: Joe Gould, Fred Birnbaum 

Art Director: Howard Wechsler 

Vice-President - advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Director: Lester J. Blumenthal 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(West Coast Manager), M. L. LeBlang, 
Beatrice Turner, William Ethe, Edna Yergin 

Vice-President & Business Manager: Bernard 

Piatt 

Circulation Department: Ann Ostrow, Emily 
Cutillo, Victoria Woods 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Published biweekly liy SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS, 
INC. Exccullv. Editorial incl Advertising Offices: 510 
Madlsoi York 22, N V. Telephone: Murray 

Hill 6-2772 Chicago Office 360 N Michigan Avenue. 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
A» Baltimore II, Md. Subscriptions: I'nlted Slates 
J* a 1 anil foreign $9. Single, copies 50c. 

Printed In 1 B \ Addre j,ii corre pondence to 510 
n Avenue, New York 22 N Y. Copyright 1950. 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS. INC. 



ARTICLES 

Spot, network, or both? 

Some simple guide rules that will help you decide how to use your national 

radio budget 1 i 

Vo .vie* (it for i h iff tii I a 

How a synthetic senorita educated and expanded the banana market 20 

TV dletlonary 

SPONSOR presents the most complete compilation of TV terms and definitions 

gathered to date <*<& 

Auto atlvertlsers ean do better 

Shrewd use of radio can spell success in 1950s tough buyer's market *4 

Yardstick #2 

New BMB survey reveals you can't judge 1950 listening by 1946 statistics ^W 

After mltlnlyht 

A SPONSOR analysis of the commercial possibilities of reaching the midnight- 

owl millions SB 

D-Day at the Waldorf 

National leaders will attend LIGHTNING THAT TALKS premiere I March 30 



IN FUTURE ISSUES 
ffoit* to erttek a stone wall 

What part radio played in Taylor-Reed Corporation's 1949 $2,000,000 gross. 
The story of a "ten-year wonder" 

Ularkets on the more 

Transit radio, currently in 19 areas, piles up exceptional results 

Women's partlelpatlon shows 

Women's programs are proving slick salesmen of products ranging from mops 
to mink coats 



Tfi<> ii-fi if (im; farm market 

Farm income and demand for electrical appliances hit an all-time high, but 
radio is generally missing the boat 






Feb. 27 



Feb. 27 



Feb. 27 



NOW YOU CAN SEE AND STUDY 



70 of Television's 
Most Successful Commercials . . 



PRIVATELY... RIGHT IN YOUR OWN 
OFFICE. ..ALL ON ONE 



1 



FREE FILM! 



_ 







To fulfill many requests which we have had from advertisers, 
and their agencies, to study the distinguished television commer- 
cials produced by Sarra, Inc. for leading television advertisers, we 
have prepared a special film featuring 10 of television's most successful 
commercials. This film is available for you to have and study right in 

your own office for as long as you 



AMONG TELEVISIONS MOST SUCCESSFUL 
ADVERTISERS ARE THESE SARRA CLIENTS: 
Amion • Amurol • Ballantine Ale & Beer • Blatz 
Brewing Company • Bulova • Eastman Kodak 
Company • Eversharp Schick • Heed Deodorant 
Heide Candy • Krueger Brewing Company . Lucky 
Strike Cigarettes • Lustre Creme Shampoo . Miller 
High Life Beer . National Shawmut Bank . Pepsi- 
Cola Company • Sante Fe Railroad ■ Tasty Bread 



want it. Others will follow periodi- 
cally. All you have to do is fill out 
the coupon below and send it to our 
nearest studio. We will immediately 
make this film of 10 successful tele- 
vision commercials available to you. 




Please send me the free film featuring 10 of television's most successful commercials. 




AR*+r llllllh 



NAME TITLE 

COMPANY 



NEWYOKK • CHICAGO ■ HOLLYWOOD 

200 EAST 56th STREET, NEW YORK 22, N. Y. ( 

16 EAST ONTARIO STREET, CHICAGO 11, ILLINOIS 
445 S. LACIENEGA BOULEVARD, HOLLYWOOD 48, CAL. 



STREET 

CITY 

I would like to study this film for weeks. 



Dept. S 



PHOTOGRAPHIC ILLUSTRATIONS • MOTION PICTURES • SOUND SLIDE FILMS • TELEVISION COMMERCIALS 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



Mighty ""Pf ' VC ' B m ° thflt Counts 
a , the End of the Game f 



5 




l « P r OOM ' Year after ye Qr 

0<^ M ° Staqs out /^ 




For 15 

Consecutive 1 

Years . .* 



/ 






Sure, there are other radio stations 
in Memphis, and there are good 
programs on those stations; but it is 
significant that FOR THE PAST FIF- 
TEEN YEARS, WMC HAS CARRIED 
MORE NATIONAL, REGIONAL 
AND LOCAL DOLLAR VOLUME 
ADVERTISING THAN ANY OTHER 
RADIO STATION IN MEMPHIS. 

WMC has made a real place for 
itself in Memphis — and there is a 
place for you on WMC. 



* — a " selective" medical advertiser has broad- 
cast 52 weeks each year over WMC for a total 
of 5,070 programs. 

(Name furnished on request.) 



WMCF 

WMCT 



NBC - 5000 

WATTS-790 

MEMPHIS 

50 KW Simultaneously Duplicating AM Schedule 

First TV Station in Memphis and the Mid-South 

National Representatives • The Branham Company 
Owned and Operated by The Commercial Appeal 



510 Madison 



\\ c should like to receive your book- 
let entitled "99 Case Histories" which 
deal with a large variety of television 
successes. 

If there is any charge for this book- 
let please let us know at once and a 
check will be sent along, although we 
understand it is available to sub- 
scribers. 

John T. Farqlhak 
Devereux & Company Inc. 
Utica, N. Y. 



We are currently planning a TV 
pitch to one of the big department 
stores down here and need as much 
background material and success 
stories as we can possibly get. 

I am sure that in the last year you 
folks have run a number of back- 
ground stories as well as success stories 
on department stores and specialty 
shops in TV. I would certainlv appre- 
ciate your sending along any material 
that you have. 

Robert S. Mather 
Television Director 
Henry J. Kaufman & Associates 
Washington. D. C. 



I am interested in obtaining a copy 
of your "99 Case Histories" covering 
TV successes on the part of depart- 
ment stores. If there is am charge 
for this pamphlet, please bill me per- 
sonally. 

W. Arthur Fielden 

Detroit Manager 

Radio and Television Department 

Camphell-Fwaltl Com pun v 



I have been an avid follower of your 
magazine since its first issue, and find 
it extremely helpful. Recently my only 
copy of vour TV Success Stories was 
lost, strayed or more prohabb stolen. 
No doubt more of your TV case his- 
tories have developed since that print- 
ing. I would appreciate your sending 
me the original 83, and any supple- 
ments thai have been printed 1>\ SPON- 
SOR PI BLII \no\s iii the time that has 
elapsed since then. 

B. J. Stapi.eton 

Television Director 

Barlow tdvertising 

S3 racuse 



SPONSOR 



for... 

complete coverage 




...UctoWHTN 

WHTN's.5 mv m contour 
wraps up the rich Huntington 
market better than any other 
station, regardless of power. 
Cost is lower, too. Add to this 
an FM bonus on WHTN-FM, 
most powerful FM station in 
the Central Ohio Valley, and 
you've got a low-cost, high 
power medium for tapping 
the gold in these hills. Take a 
look at the Huntington Market 
...$300,000,000 in retail 
sales... then make up your 
mind to get your share by 
using WHTN and WHTN-FM. 

THE POPULAR STATION 

^^ if w i ■ iv w 

800 KC ■ ' ^ 1005 MC 



51 000 WMrs 



HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 

For availabilities rates and 
other information, wire, write 
or phone 

Pace- Wiles, Inc., Advertising 

Huntington, West Virginia 

National Representatives 



In cooperation with our local de- 
partment stores we are endeavoring to 
accumulate a list of successful televi- 
sion shows that have been used by de- 
partment stores or any type of retail 
establishment. We are specifically in- 
terested in the format of the particular 
show and it possible anj examples of 
concrete results. 

Dan Starr 

KING 

Seattle 

• Several significant department store TV rac 
ceSSM .irr r.-. i.r.l.d In "99 TV Results." A new 
edition of "TV Result." containing: 199 results 
will lie published late in February. This will be a 
-bonus" to SPONSOR subscribers. 



KIDDING MR. HOOPER 

Just thought the following might be 
of interest to you, as a little short note 
kinda' kidding Hooper and Conlan: 

ATTENTION MR. HOOPER AND 
MR. CONLAN — In a recent campaign 
conducted in the city of Hannibal, Mr. 
Herb Tuttle, manager of the Gamble- 
Skogmo Store made his own survey. 
The campaign consisted of station- 
break announcements over Radio Sta- 
tion KHMO, advising listeners on the 
merits of Coronado appliances, and to 
be on the look-out for "the Friendly 
Gamble Man when he called at their 
door." In the follow-up, the appliance 
man made 27 calls and in all 27, was 
received with the information that the 
housewife had heard the announce- 
ments. 

Wayne W. Cribb 
General Manager 
KHMO 
Hannibal. Mo. 



HONEST REPORTING 

Timed as it is, just before our 4th 
survey, and just before BMB's release 
of its current reports, the article in 
your 16 January issue entitled "BBM 
Works in Canada" will do a fine bit of 
selling for BBM and some much need- 
ed needling for those stations in the 
United States who are slow to see the 
definite benefits of BMB (or its suc- 
cessor ) . 

We would be the first to agree that 
station audience measurement has not 
reached the ultimate. There will al- 
\\a\s be changes of one sort or another. 
But we are sure most everyone will 
concede that constructive steps have 
been taken, and that given time, all 
difficulties can be ironed out. 

i /'lease turn to page 62) 




are on CKAC 

because CKAC 

reaches 

450,000 

French radio 

homes, 

or 7 

out of every 10 

in Quebec 

CBS Outlet In Montreal 

Key Station of the 

£ TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CKAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives : 

Adam J. Young Jr. - New York, Chicago 

William Wright - Toronto 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



forecasts of things to come, as 
seen I v SFONSOR'S editors 



Outlook 



Cigar manufacturers look 
to spot radio to spur sales 

In 1920, over 8,000,000 < iuars were sold. Last \ear, with 
the above-] 1-year-old population 20.000.000 higher, onl) 
5,600,000,000 cigars were smoked. The total dropped 
200,000,000 from 1948. To combat this alarming decline, 
radio spot advertising will be emphasized. Meanwhile, the 
American Cigarette and Cigar Company, which was count- 
ing on its half-hour weekly CBS program starring Joan 
Davis to boost sales of its Roi-Tan cigars, is discontinuing 
the show after 3 March. 

Supreme Court may rule 
on TV film censorship 

Like man) a movie company, TV and commercial film 
makers are being plagued by state and local film censors. 
To rectifj this threat to free speech, a Federal court has 
decided that, since TV i- in interstate commerce, the FCC 
is in lull (barge. The Supreme Court may rule next on 
this derision. 

FM stations showing 
increase not decline 

With Transit radio. St o recasting, and other functional 
forms as stimuli. FM is not yet ready to be counted out 
of aural broadcasting. As of 12 January there were 733 
I M stations on the air in contrast to 701 in January. 1949. 

Larger screen trend seen 
in TV tube sales 

Will falling prices and an increase in l\ set production. 
the purchasing trend is toward larger screen sets. Kipiip- 
ment manufacturers report that of all the television-^ pe 
cathode ra\ lubes bought recenl) over half were over the 
12-inch size. 

Out-of-home listening 
bonus to be explained 

The sizable advertising bonus thai radio sponsors have re- 
ceived for years via auto radio-: restaurant, beaut) parlor, 
and barbei shop listening; beach and outdoor entertain- 
menl audiences will soon be explained. Pulse studio, now 
made for WNEW, Southern California Broadcasters, and 
others, reveals the advertising importance of radio's "Big 
Plus. During 1950 the lull extent ol radio's audience 
will be brought home to advertisers. Further light on this 
important subject will come from studies showing times 
ol da) when out-of-home listeners ate at their peak, what 
types of audiences predominate al specific periods. Kale 

'.nd- may, ill some cases, he adjusted when lull scope of 

in inted audience i- determined. 



Frozen milk concentrate looms 
as future industry 

Because of the boom in frozen orange juice, many com- 
panies are now working on methods to put frozen milk 
concentrate into cans. The frozen milk, cheaper than fluid 
milk, ma) be available to retail customers in about two 
\ears. Meanwhile. Minute Maid Corporation, which makes 
frozen juices, plans to spend some S2.000.000 in advertis- 
ing. This will include a heavy radio spot campaign. 

Radio, TV sales hit 
a new high in 1949 

Dollar sales of radio and television sets hit a new high last 
\ear of $850,000,000. This is a 13 percent increase over 
1948 sales. With an increase in radio receiver sales and 
the selling boom on TV sets, 1950 looms as another banner 
year for manufacturers. 

Brazil and Canada plan 
TV stations 

A Brazilian radio network plans to construct a TV station 
in Sao Paulo which is expected to go on the air next sum- 
mer. In Canada, plans for stations in Toronto and Mon- 
treal are in progress. It won't be long now before Ameri- 
can advertisers are able to plug their products via video 
in the rich Brazilian and Canadian markets. 

Radio-in-every-room can be 
important selling point in 1950 

Of the 8.000.000 radio sets sold in 1949 I at $320,000,000 
retail I 6,000.000 were table models mostly for the "radio- 
in-every-room" market. This could be the radio manu- 
facturers' best market in 1950, too. With daytime TV pro- 
graming still in the experimental stage, radio can easily 
monopolize the daytime audience while battling video for 
the evening listener (viewer). A radio-in-every-room for 
the children, the busy housewife, or one for Dad to hear 
his favorite program can be the "gimmick to increase 
radio set sales. 

Commercial shortwave source 
of revenue for stations 

l'ri\atel\ owned shortwave stations can look to \merican 
industr) having factories abroad to advertise via their 
wavelengths. Station WRl !. (Boston) 250.000 watter has 
signed International General Electric Compan) as its first 
client. Success of this venture max encourage other indus- 
trial firms to beam commercial programing abroad. 

1950 prospects given 
for radio, TV set sales 

Total radio. TV and record player purchases for 1950 are 
estimated ai $740,000,000 or an average of $17.60 per 
famil) . This is 7.5 percent of the national total to be spent 
for all product groups. 

Used-car dealers plan 
1950 radio promotion 

With the auto industr) stepping up its 1950 advertising 
budget, local used-car dealers hope to keep pace with their 
promotional efforts. Present plans call for the used-car 
dealers to spend $15 pei cai sale foi radio promotion. 



8 



SPONSOR 




JACK HOLDEN 




for grocery store products- 




JACK 



Al TIFFANY 



HAL CULVER 



Products are accepted at once as friends in the 
millions of Chicago-Midwest homes where they're 
introduced by the WLS personalities who visit 
these homes every day — and bring the friendly 
kind of radio service for which WLS has always 
been noted. 

In 1949, more than 100 famous names in 
food store products used WLS as a sound way 
to make friends and step up sales among the 
substantial, home-loving families of Chicago 
and its surrounding 4-state area . . . the big, 
region where people in city, town and farm 
depend on WLS for accurate information, 
for dependable advice and for clean, fam- 
ily-style entertainment. 

High on the loyal listening list is WLS 
Feature Foods, unique in its friendly, in- 
formal selling of grocery-store products. 
The WLS sales manager or your John 
Blair man can tell you more about 
how you, too, can use WLS person- 
alities to increase your sales in this 
market WLS has always programmed 
for. Meantime, send for your free 
copy of the information-packed 
Feature Foods booklet, "How to 
make this WLS -Chicago market 
your market." Address Sales Man- 
ager, WLS, Chicago 7, Illinois. 



890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, AMERICAN AFFILIATE, REPRESENTED^ BY JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY 
13 FEBRUARY 1950 




I 






"Mr. President" and \\ illie WISH 

have just been re-elected 

by a landslide vote. 

Yes, Morris Plan, one of the leading financial 

institutions in the Indianapolis market, 

has just renewed the popular 

"Mr. President" program for a third term. 

This is typical of many successful firms 

that have found that Ion;: term 

advertising on WISH docs the job. 



that powerful puller in Indianapolis . . • 



sJuAO^vri 





OF INDIANAPOLIS 

affiliated with AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY 

GEORGE J. HIGGINS, General Monoqer 



uV#»it? and r 



13 lelirmiri, 1950 




These reports appear in alternate Issues 



New on Networks 



SPONSOR 



Anahlst 

Bowey's Dari-Rit h 
(Columbia Recording* 
Doubled ay & Co 
Doublcday & Co 

Globe Mill* 
Kellogg Co (Pep) 
Miles Laboratories 
Henjamin Moore 
Quaker Oats Co 
Quaker Oats Co 
Shulton Inc 
Win H. Wise 



AGENCY NET STATIONS 

1 not* , Cone X lidding 
Sorenson & Co 

MrCanti I n< k ... , 
Huber lloge & Sons 
flnber Hope & Sons 

I, CO Kiirn. II 
Krtnon A Frkhnrdt 
Wade 

St. (.rurpr-4 & Keyes 
V-t-tlh.im, Louis «£ Krurbv 
N.i flli.im, Louis & Brorh) 
Wesley Associates 
Thwing A A 1 1 m a it 



MBS 


.155 


MBS 




CBS 


58 


NBC 


43 


ABC 


61 


CBS 


12 


MBS 


65 


MBS 


410 


MBS 


375 


CBS 


38 


CBS 


17 


NBC 


13 


i 11^ 


53 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

True or False) Sat 5-5:30 pm; January 

Radio llarri- Hollywood News; Sal 5:30-15 pm 

The. L P Record Parade; Sun 4:30-5 pm ; Feb 5; 13 wk» 

Edwin C. Hill Farts Unlimited; Sun 4-4:30 pm; Jan 18; 13 wk» 

Jacques Fray (Music) Sidney Walton (News) Sat two 15-mlnute nee,. 

ments Immediately after the Metropolitan Opera 
Im. To Be Young; Sat 2:30-3 pm; Jan 7; 52 wks 
Mark Trail; MWF 5-5:30 pm; Jan 30 
Ladles Fair; M-F 2:15-30 pm; Feb 6 
Your Home Beautiful; Sat 11-11:15 am; March 4 

Grady Cole & The Johnson Family; MWF 2-2:15 pm ; Jan 6; 52 wks 
Lou Child.. . T, Tl. 2-2:15 pm ; Jan 16; 52 wks 
Fun To B Young; Sat 2:30-3 pm; Jan 7; 52 wks 
Get More Out of Life; Sun 12-12:30 pm; Jan 22; 13 >. k. 



Renewals on Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY NET STATIONS 



A II.. r. Milling Co 
Norwich Pharmacal Co 
Seeman Brothers Inc 



Krwin, Wasey 
Benton A Bowles 
Win. II. Weinlraiih 



NBC 13 
ABS 232 
CBS 170 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Aunt Mary; M-F 3:30-45 pm Par time; Jan 13; 26 wks 

The Fat Man; F 8-8:30 pm; Feb 10; 52 wks 

Allan Jackson & The News; Sat 11-11:05 am; Jan 28: 52 wks 



National Broadcast Sales Executives <**™«™i changes) 



NAME 



Isabel Biasini 
John J. Cole 
I .in. Crawford 
John Rhys Evans Jr 
Frank Falknor 
Albert E. Foster 
William C. Gfttinger 
Robert P. Heller 
Andrew I. Keay 
Marion Lennox 
Dean Linger 
Norman Louvau 
Sarkett Miles 
Arthur Mundorff 
Victor T. Norton 
Frank J. Reed 
Hubbell Robinson Jr 
Ralph A. Sayres 
James M. Seward 
Frank Shakespeare 

Franklin H. Small 
Alexander Stronach Jr 
Karl R. Sntphin 
Charles Vanda 
J. L. Van Yolkenburg 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

MBS, N. Y., continuity acceptance dept 
Win V. Pittsb., sis sve mgr 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Frederic W. Ziv Co., N. Y., northwest rep 
W BBM. Chi., genl mgr 
Lever Brothers, N. Y., dir of media 
CBS, N. Y., vp in charge of AM network his 
CBS, N. Y., head of documentary unit, exec prod 
iBC, V Y., traffic and stn rcl dept 
MBS, IN*. Y., continuity acceptance dept 
\\ \*i/, Detroit, prom-publ dir 
KRON-FM, S. F.. comml rep 
Flske & Scheyhing, N. Y., statistician 
WPAT, Paterson, N. J., asst vp 
American Home Foods Inc, N. Y., prei 
NBC, N. Y. 

CBS, N. Y.j vp in charge of network programs 
K Y W, Phi) a., comml mgr 
( BS, V *. .. \p in charge of operations 
WOK. V Y., head of radio ill ivc 

Professor Quiz radio program, managing dir 

ABC. N. Y., mgr of tr programs 

ABC, Chi., central division, sis prom m .: ■ 

< IBS, * rsirrn division, exec prod ( H'wood ) 

< BS, N. *fc ., vp in charge of tv operations 



Same, asst dir of religious programs 

Same, acet exec 

WPEN, Phila., sU mgr 

KOMO, Seattle, acct exec 

CBS, N. Y., vp in charge of program operation 

WLAW, Lawrence, Mass., stn mgr 

Same, vp and asst to pres 

Same, >". Y. dir of programs for radio network 

WFIL-TV. Phila., charge of tv sis SVC 

Same, asst dir of continuity acceptance dept 

ABC, Chi., central division, *ls prom mgr 

KRON-TV, S. F., sis mgr 

NBC, N. Y., mgr of AM sis sve 

WOR, N. Y., sis dept, acct exec 

NBC, N. Y., vp for administration 

Same, tv sis sve dept mner 

Same, supervisor of all radio and tv 

WMBW, Miami Beach, acct exec 

Same, vp in charge of business affairs, network programs 

WOIC-TV, Washington, D. C, natl -pot sis and -vc rep (Mr. 

Shakespeare will work out of WOR's N. Y. office) 
WNDR, Syracuse, vp in charpe of sll 
Same, null dir of tv program operations 
Same, acct exec 
WCAL'-TV, Phila., dir of tv 
Same, vp in charge of network ill 



i hi in 



in next issue: IMetv National Spot Busitiess; JVetc and Renewed on Television; 

Station Representation Changes; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



\eic and Renewed 13 Febmary 1950 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 

James *A . Donaldson 
Clarence C. Felix 
Ily Freedman 

F. C. Frey 
Eric R. Griffithi 
A- Stanley Kramer 
John F. Morten 

Samuel Olchak 
Charles Sanford 
Martin 1* Scher 

G. E. von Kus*e 
Chandler T. While 

William Wylle 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

Standard Brands Inc, N. \ ., eastern regional sis mgr 
Avco Mfg. Corp, Cincinnati, works mpr of Crosley div 
Hunts Foods, Fullerton, Calif., penl sis staff 
American Maize Prods Co, N. Y., penl sis mgr 
I it tern at ion a I Silver Co of Canada Ltd, sis exec 
Hirshon-Garliehl Inc. N. Y., accl exec 



Air Km, Pro (I nets Co I lie 
Amerian Maize Prods Co, 
Admiral Corp ( N. Y. distr 



Brooklyn, < 
N. Y., acct 
ibuting divis 



lis mpr 

on) penl 



Central Aniline Works divisjoi 

Film Corp, N. Y. 
American Maize Prods Co, Chi. 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Phillips Pack i up Co inc. Cambridge, Md.. pen sis mgr 

Same, assl to penl mgr 

Same, L. A., asst mereh mgr 

Same. a--t to vp 

Same, dir and vp in charge of sis 

Burlington Mills Corp, N. Y„ adv dir 

V/eslinphouse Electric Corp, Sturtcvant di\, Hyde Park. Mass., 

adv and sis prom mgr 
Same, adv and -Is prom mpr 
Same, mpr of hulk sis dept 
Motorola, -V Y., penl sis mpr 
P. Ball ant ine & Sons, Newark, N. J., assoe penl sis mpr 

Same, vp 

Same, mpr of central div package sis dept 



New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



Adams Corp, Bcloit, Vt ,*c. 

Airline Foods Corp, Linden, N. J. 

Ashley Automatic Wood Stove Co, Columbia, S. C. 

Cameo Curtains Inc, Chi, 

Carrom Industries Inc, Ludington, Mich. 

Colonial Airlines Inc, N. Y. 

Cott Beverage Co, New Hat en 

DeJnr Amsco Corp, N. V 

Allen B. DuMont Lahs Inc. Clifton, N. J., 

The Eastern Wine Corp. N. Y. 

Farmers' and Consumers 1 Dairy. Morristown, N. J. 

Fern ode Foundations. N. Y. 

France Laboratories Inc, S. F. 

Garfield Tea Co, Brooklyn 

Jean Graef Inc. N. Y. 

Graflex Inc, Rochester 

Green man Sherrill Furniture Corp, N. Y. 

Groveton Paper- Co, Groveton, N. H. 

Ilaffrnreffer & Co, Boston 

Hanford Hotel, Mason City, Iowa 

The Hudepohl Brewing Co, Cincinnati, O. 

Ideal Macaroni Co, Cleveland, O. 

Jekyll Island Packing Co Inc, Brunswick, Georgia 

Lever Brothers, V Y. (John F. Jelke division) 

Light Grain & Milling Co, Liberal, (Cans. 

Lissons-Llndeman U. S. A. Inc, V V 

Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. Springfield, 

Mass. 
Miracold Inc, Senile 
C. A. Mosso Co Chicago 
Peg Newton, N. Y. 
Owens Krass Inc, Rochester, N. Y. 
Parfums Charhcrt Ine, N. Y. 
Perfeo. Mfg. < <• Shenandoah, Iowa 
Petal an Co, Milwaukee 
Piper Aircraft Corp, Lock Haven, Pa. 
Quaker Mats Co, Chicago 
Hcpina Cigar Co, Philadelphia 
P. J. Hitter Co, Bridgeton, N. J. 

Ityun Candy Co Lid, >. ^ . 

II. .ml.ro House of Design, N. Y. 

M & C Foods, Chicago 

Louis Sherry, N. Y. 

Silklin Paper Corp, S. F. 

Stella i hecse * <•, Chicago 

The Sterling Insurance Co, < lii. 

Sylvanla Electric Products Inc, N. Y. 

Teg Corporation, Dallas 

Tennessee Bis. nit Co, Nashville 
I ru Cote Manufacturing Co, N, Y. 

I lira Drop Forpe A Tool Corp, I'tica, N. V 
V, ard Paper Co., Merrill, Y* isr. ( Division of Arvey 
< orp, Chi.) 

White Star Mill*. StaunlOD, Va. 



Korn Kurls 

Food service 

Wood hurninp stoves 

Curtains 

Furniture 

Air travel 

Beverages 

Cameras 

Receiver sis div 

Chateau Martin wines 

Frozen food 

Girdles 

Shampoo 

Tea 

Cirard-Pcrrepaux watches 

Cameras 

Furniture 

Paper products 

Pickwick ale 

Hotel 

Beer 

Macaroni 

Frozen seafood 

Margarine 

Pancake .V waffle mix 
International travel 
Insurance 

"Miracold" 

Antiseptic 

Fashions 

"Sark" cross word cards 

Perfume 

Starch and hleach 

Powdered meal tenderlzcr 

Piper Cub 

Aunt Jem i in a ready mixes 

Cigars 

Food packers 

"llopalonp Cassidy" candy 

Home furnishings 

Food distributors 

Presen es 

Paper product 1 

Cheese 

I nsurancc 

Electric products 

"Teg" pK eol inhaler 

Baked goods 

Master (Wow floor polish 

Tool in a mi fae Hirers 

"I. nsi re Duster* 1 



AGENCY 

Karl Ludgin, Chicago 

Chambers & Wiswell In.-, N. Y. 

Hugh A. Deadwyler, Charlotte, N. C. 

Philbin, Brandon & Sargent Inc, N. Y. 

Waldie & Brig?!-, Chi. 

Redficld-Johnstone Inc. N. Y. 

John C. Dowtl Inr. Boston 

Perk, IN. Y. 

Cainpl.ell-K>.ald Co Inr. N. Y. 

II. C. Morris & Co, N. Y. 

Tracy, Kent & Co, N. Y. 

II. W. Fairfax, N. V 

Buchanan Co, S. I 

Artwil Co, N. Y. 

N. W. Aver, IN. Y. 

Cecil & Presbrey Inc, N. V. 

Victor A. Bennett Co, N. Y. 

John C. Dowd Inc, Boston 

Alley & Richards Inc, N. Y. 

Schoenfeld. lluher e* Green, Chicago 

Stockton, West *v Burkhart Inc, Cincinnati 

The Carptener Co, (Cleveland 

Lewis Edwin Ryan In.', Washington, D. C. 

BBD&O, N. Y. 

The Paul A. Iago Co, Wichita, Kans. 

Victor A. Bennett Co Inc, N. Y. 

J. Walter Thompson, N. Y. 

-sir.mg & Prosser, Seattle 

Street & Finney, Chicago 

Kay-llirsch Co, N. Y. 

Hutchins, Rochester, V Y. 

II. W. Fairfax, N. Y. 

Buchanan-Thomas, Omaha. Nebraska 

Andrew. Milwaukee 

Do Garmo Inc, IN. Y. 

Price, Robinson *\ Frank Inc. Chicago 

C-rcsh .V Kramer, Philadelphia 

Lamb & Kecne, Phila. 

Blaker, N. Y. 

Victor A. Bennett, IN. Y. 

Morris F. Swancy Inc. Chicago 

llobley Co Inc, IN. Y. 

Botsford, Cotistantinc X Cardncr, S. F. 

Smith, Benson & McClurc Inc, Chicago 

Reincke, Meyer .V Finn Inr. Chi. 

Cecil & Presbrey, V Y. 

E. It. Henderson, Dallas 

L. W. Roush Co, Nashville 

Getschal A Richard Inc. N. Y. 

Wilson, Haight A Welch, Hartford. Conn. 

Richard II. Brad] Co. Siccus Point, Wisconsin 



Melr 



II, 



Conrtland '' F< 



Ii 



Rirhii 



* 



ARE YOU FOOLED BY 
GIMMICK HYPOED SURVEYS ? 

(OR ARE WE MEANIES FOR BEING SNITCHERS?) 



There is only one measuring stick, 
KMLB believes, in evaluating listeners 
— and that's by having a KNOWN 
consistent audience built by sound, 
progressive programming. Most time- 
buyers evaluate stations on this basis 
— and buy radio time accordingly, 
even when stations bellow, "Hooper 
says I'm high," or "Conlan says I'm 
first." 

True, audiences are fickle. But never 
fickle enough to stray from its strong- 
est source of attraction which has been 
developed by years of painstaking cul- 
tivation. 



KMLB is 20 years young — the 
youngsters, the oldsters, the new- 
comers, the old settlers, the city folks, 
the farmers, all KNOW KMLB as well 
or better than their closest of kinfolks. 
You might as well knock the props 
from under the Louisiana State capi- 
tol as try to seduce KMLB's faithful 
audience. 



Agreed, some like to hear the jingle 
of "mike" dollars on silly gimmick 



programs. And they even turn away 
from KMLB just long enough to see 
if they will be called to answer "How 
old are you?" for a dollar. But when 
the give-away gimmicks have spun 
their wheel of chance, they turn to the 
station they have been trained and cul- 
tivated to listen to — KMLB. 



It is on this basis of reasoning that 
we know KMLB is first in the "ears of 
its countrymen," even in face of a cur- 
rent Hooper survey which lowers our 
listening temperatures in "SPOTS" to 
only slightly below that of our compet- 
ing station. 

WE didn't jingle give-away dollars 
15 TIMES A DAY in our audi- 
ence's ears DURING THE 
SURVEY to make our enviable 
showing — (now aren't we the meanies 
for being snitchers?) 

So all we ask is — reason it out — 

GET THE TRUTH, kmlb 

will always be first as long as it keeps 
faith with its loyal audience by better 
programming. 



KM LB- KM FM 



5000 WATTS-AM 



17,000 WATTS-FM 



MONROE, LOUISIANA 



Affiliated with AMERICAN BROADCASTING CO. 



Repreiented by TAYLOR BORROFF CO. 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



13 




in Dollar Value 




Represented By 

FORJOE 4 CO., INC. 

T. B. Baker, Jr., Genera/ Manager 



* 



:w^k*D*A 6 




Mr. Sponsor 



Chttrtos Erwln Wilso n 

President 
General Motors Corporation, Detroit 



Charles Erwin Wilson, president of General Motors Corporation, 
is ^electing advertising media with special care this year. The auto- 
motive industry's backlogs and waiting lists are pari ol a pasl era. 
Today, he is selling his cars in a buyer's market. 

Wilson is largely responsible for shaping the overall policies of 
his division chiefs; it's he who keeps them hitting on all cylinders. 
From his office in Detroit's General Motors Building, he directs the 
operations of the GM empire with calm and searching deliberation. 
In contrast to his dynamite predecessor the late William S. Knudsen, 
lie dislikes making snap deeisions. Wilson rarely relaxes, often re- 
mains at his office through an entire nighl clearing up urgent matters. 

\\ ilson made up his mind early. From the time he flipped his first 
light switch, he knew he wanted to be an electrical engineer. And 
he turned out to be a crackerjack. At 18 he had completed a four- 
scar course at Carnegie Tech in three years and landed a job at 
Westinghouse. (Salary: 18 cents an hour, i B\ the time he was 22. 
he had designed the firm's first auto starter motor. 

After the first World War Wilson accepted a job as chief engineer 
and sales manager of Renn Fleet ric Compain. a CM subsidiary. 
He became a CM vice-president nine years later: five \ears after that 
he was Bill Knudsens right hand man. When F. I). R. appointed 
Knudsen to the Slate Department in 1940, W ilson look over the Cor- 
poration's top job. Since then the snowy-haired, slow-talking GM 
lioss has deftlv accomplished two major feats: ralhing the vast CM 
facilities for war production; and reconverting plants at war's end. 

Of General Motors" estimated $10-12,000,000 annual advertising 
budget, $2,000,000 is spent for radio. The bulk of its air expendi- 
tures is allotted to spot. GM sponsors only one AM network pro- 
gram, a weekl) newscast b\ Henry .1. Taylor. To supplement its radio 
advertising, the firm has waded deeph into television. For Chevrolet, 
leader in the low-price field. GM has two network telecasts: "Che\ - 
lolel Tele-Theatre": and "Inside USA." In addition, it sponsors a 
thrice-weekl) TV newscast. In 1950 GM expects to make substantial 
gains in the competitive battle for bigger >ales. (See story elsewhere 
in this issue for an overall analysis ol automotive advertising. I 



14 



SPONSOR 



New developments on SPONSOR stories 



p.s 



jCC; "Baseball listening continues to spiral' 
Issue : May 1948, p. 23 
Subject: W.'nter s.->ort:ca3ting 



For the Tide Water Associated Oil Company sponsoring sporting 
events has heen a profitable project. Associated is one of the leading 
radio and television sponsors of collegiate foothall and basketball 
games in the far West. Its current schedule of basketball broadcasts 
is the biggest ever to be aired to Pacific Coast listeners. 

This year the games are being carried on more stations covering a 
wider area than in previous seasons. The expanded station list means 
Associated's commercials are being heard by thousands of new 
listeners in territories which the firm has never reached before. The 
games are carried over the Intermountain Network of Idaho and 
Utah. In addition, thirty-two prominent independent stations are 
airing the hoop clashes. Associated will sponsor a total of 253 games 
during the regular season. 

The firm's television efforts have been equally as vigorous. Asso- 
ciated is sponsoring the first basketball telecasts in Northern Cali- 
fornia. Stanford and California Universities have granted the com- 
pany TV rights for several of their conference games. During the 
past football season Associated contracted for more than 110 broad- 
casts and eleven gridiron telecasts. The season was highlighted by its 
sponsorship of the nationally famous Shrine East-West football 
classic, over KGO-TV. San Francisco. 

Said Harold R. Deal. Associated's advertising and sales promotion 
manager, who directs its AM broadcast and television activities: 

"Our sportcast schedule takes on increasing significance as a major 
medium of advertising as we participate in a competitive race for 
business during 1950. " 



|>.s. 



See: "\ 



'What it costs to use TV" 
IsSUe: December 1947, p. 18 
Subject: Simulated television 



How do you show an advertiser what his film commercial will 
look like on a TV screen without tying up the broadcasting facilities 
of a station? 

Many an agency faces that problem. But the Petry Company has 
it licked now. Petry uses a mockup of a TV set with a movie projec- 
tor placed inside behind the screen. Turn out room lights, flick a 
switch . . . zip, die sponsor can sit back and make his decision on the 
film. The system's called "simulated television." 

"Simulated television" will accelerate the sale of TV film com- 
mercials and shows to prospective clients. It eliminates several major 
roadblocks. When films are shown on large projection screens, cli- 
ents often delay making their final decision until they can see them 
on a TV screen. The agency then has to arrange a showing at a tele- 
vision station; this can only be done when the station is not operat- 
ing, resulting in further postponement oi the sale. 

The first installation of "simulated television" has been set up 
in Petry's Chicago office. Windy City advertising men. who have 
brought their clients to the company's viewing room, are convinced 
of its value. They agree that this method eliminates the cost and in- 
convenience of station previews. It is a boon to TV sales. 



k-nuz 

SUCCESS 
STORY! 




Mr. Harry Hartley 

Here are the amazing facts! Mr. 
Harry Hartley began the Texas 
Engine Service in March, 1948, 
soon afterwards buying time on 
KNUZ. In two year-' consistent 
use of KM Z's advertising 
facilities Mr. Hartley has be- 
come one of our major clients, 
and his organization has be- 
come one of the major busi- 
nesses in the Houston area. Be- 
sides the Texas Engine Service 
Mr. Hartley now owns National 
Motor Exchange. Beaumont. 
Texas; International Motor Be- 
building Co.. Houston, supply- 
ing dealers throughout the 
Southwest, and United Motor 
Exchange. Ft. Worth. 



Mr. Hartley says this about 
KNUZ's pulling power: "The 
success of building my company 
to a million dollar business in 
such a short time is directly at- 
tributed to the splendid results 
we've enjoyed from the adver- 
tising on KNUZ. When I 
bought KM Z it was one of the 
smartest advertising buys I've 
ever made." 



Let us add your name to 
our impressive lint of satis- 
fied advertisers — let your 
company's or client's suc- 
cess story he a part of 
the amazing KXl'Z success 
storv ! 



CALL, WIRE OR WRITE 

FORJOE: NAT. REP. 

DAVE MORRIS, MGR. 

CE-8801 

k-nuz 

(KAY-NEWS) 

9th Floor Sconlan Bldg. 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



15 



Wl Pfl W P 




RADIO AND TEL 





ON STATION REPRESENTATIVES 




NEW YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO 



DETROIT • SAN FRANCISCO 



ATLANTA • HOLLYWOOD 







network, 
or both? 



Some simple rulos to holp 

you doc*iclt k how to use 
> on i* national radio budget 



fly ftjf 



Examine NETWORK 
if your product . . . 

1. Has national distribution (this does not pre- 
clude spot, but is requisite for net use) 

2. Has year-round market 

3. Has even, high consumer appeal (not affected 
by regional likes and dislikes) 

4. Has large volume of sales 

5. Has large advertising budget 

6. Needs prestige of big-name entertainment 

7. Needs heavy merchandising 

8. Needs large-scale institutional advertising 



Spot radio advertising i~ to nel advertising what news- 
papers are to national magazines. Wi'h sizable increases in 
advertising forecast For L950, advertisers will do well to 
ponder the basic rules which indicate whether the major 
radio expenditure should l>e allocated to network or spot 
advertising . . . or both. 

The hasii rules listed on this pa<re are fundamental, anil 
almost 100 percent applicable. The verj fact that the) 
seem uncomplicated maj be misleading. Most have ramifi- 
cations; each should be sifted carefully. 

To assist in this sifting process. SPONSOR has prepared this 
article with the cooperation of network and spot sp cialists. 
It is readil) admitted b\ spot spokesmen that there are cer- 
ain functions that only a network program can fulfill: and 
the conviction works both ways. It is admitted, also, thai 
the two overlap and supplement each other. There are cases 
where a sale-man of one will advise his client to buj the 
o her. This isn't altruism. It's simph smart business. A 
successful spot user often becomes a hot prospect for net- 
work advertising, forced into the webs prematurely, he 
ma\ cease to be a radio user at all. 

Let us examine briefly the accepted rules governing the 
decision to bu\ network and or spot; note examples of suc- 
cessful usage; then continue to a discussion of disputed 
points and those needing amplification. 



spot 



Examine SPOT 

if your product... 

1. Has national distribution (see point no. 1 
under network) 

2. Has spotty distribution 

3. Is seasonal 

4. Has distinct variation in 'regional consumer 
acceptance 

5. Is new or speculative 

6. Has limited budget 

7. Needs a pickup in specific markets 

8. Needs to reach 'a specific audience at peak 
listening time 







Cavalcade of America" does top prestige job for duPont Fibber McGee & Molly started slow, but once up the ladder they stayed 



National advertisers in a wide range 
of products, including food, drugs and 
tol-acco. fulfill all positive points for 
using network. ( jgarcitc-. lor example. 

Cigarettes have national distribution, 
and popular appeal not seriously af- 
fected {excepting Salt Lake City) by 
regional or sex differences. Certain 
consumer variations do exist. In 
metropolitan Philadelphia, for in- 
stance. 4(>.7 percent of the women 
smoke: in medium-sized Milwaukee. 
37.6 pci nut. and in the comparatively 
small town of Modesto. Calif., 30.3 
percent. In rural and farm areas, per- 
centage- arc -till lower. Such fluctua- 



tions, however, are so small as to he of 
little importance. A large portion of 
the audience are potential smokers, and 
the good-will angle alone is worth 
using blanket coverage. Philip Morris 
gracefully nods to this portion of its 
audience by suggesting that, even if 
\ ou are a non-smoker, its gracious to 
have Philip Morris in the house for 
guests who do smoke. 

Cigarettes have a steady, year-round 
market, and tremendous volume of 
sales. Manufacturers' sales reach as- 
tronomical figures. In 1949. the esti- 
mated dollar volume of the Big Five 
was: \merican Tobacco i Lucks 




?ads part for "Skippy Hollywood Theater" with producer-director Mitchel 



Strike I. §875,000,000; R. J. Reynolds 
(Camel), $740,000,000: Liggett & 
Meyers ( Chesterfield I , $565,000,000: 
Philip Morris, $260,000,000, and P. 
Lorillard (Old Gold), $160,000,000. 

Because of this volume, cigarette 
manufacturers have a large advertising 
budget. With such high-ceiling ex- 
penditures, cigarettes can also cater to 
all audience tastes, as witness Camel 
with its Bob Hawk quiz show. Jimim 
Durante comedy show. Screen Guild 
dramatic interlude, and the Vaughn 
Monroe musical stanza. 

(While on the subject of tobacco, it 

is not amiss here to underscore a point 
made b\ several spot spokesmen: net- 
work is a poor buy for products faced 
with a diminishing market, such as 
plug tobacco and cigars . . . high pro- 
gram ratings to the contrary. Latest 
to substantiate this is American To- 
bacco's Joan Da\is program for Roi 
I an cigars. Despite one of the heftiest 
ratings on the CBS Friday night sched- 
ule (11.6, topped onl\ b\ Oxydol's 
12.0 i. the compan) will not pick up its 
option when the initial 26-week cycle 
ends 3 March. It is apparent that the 
audience is being sold on Miss Davis. 
lull not on cigars. Such sponsors, to 
recoup consumer demand, should move 
into high potential markets with a 
program aimed directlj at men.) 

Because of keen competition, cigar- 
ettes need heavy merchandising and 
prestige to hold brand preference gains. 



DISTRIBUTION OF PURCHASES BY GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS 



Per cent distribution of purchase! (in pints) for home consumption by geographic regions, and % U. S. 
families in each. Nov. 1947 through Apr. 1948. Totol for U. S. - (100%) equals 59.630.000 pints. 



19.0 



per cent sales for region ~~ J per tent U. S. family population 




|NEW YORK 
CITY 



NEW 
ENGLAND 



EAST 



SOUTH 
EAST 



SOUTH 
CENTRAL 



EAST 
CENTRAL 



8.8 



COOKING 
OILS 



11.7 



iiUU 



9.9 



6.6 



CENTRAL 



23.3 



WEST MOUNTAIN & PACIFIC 

CENTRAL SOUTH WEST 



REGIONAL VARIATION IN COOKING OIL SALES IS TYPICAL OF MANY PRODUCTS WHICH CAN BEST BE SOLD VIA SPOT RADIO 



Network advertising lends itself to 
both with a minimum of effort. \\ hile 
a regional or local favorite has excel- 
lent pulling power, national names do 
a comparable job on a coast-to-coast 
basis. Names featured in most pro- 
grams are as familiar to listeners as 
their own; their faces are recognized 
in the remotest hamlets. And merchan- 
dising potentialities are ace high. 
What better brand promotion than the 
Bob Hope, Jack Benny, and Arthur 
Godfrey pictures on holiday cartons? 

Cigarette manufacturers, then, ful- 
fill seven of the eight positive points 
listed for going network (institutional 
advertising will be dealt with separate- 
ly). Does this mean that spot adver- 
tising is not a valid, valuable medium 
for the sale of cigarettes? Definitely 
not. Top ranking manufacturers in 
this and other fields are turning to 
spot (particularly daytime) in increas- 
ing numbers to buttress their network 
activities. It does mean that if your 
product does not possess these pre- 
requisites, network advertising is gen- 
erally a risky and wasteful choice. 

As for institutional advertising . . . 
Spot is invaluable for its ability to 
move in and bolster weak public rela- 
tions in a given area. For clarifying 
labor relations in trouble spots, get- 
ting the straight story across in cities 
where the truth has become distorted 
by rival factions. But for consistent 
institutional advertising, network gets 



the vote. The established listening 
power, the loyalty built by weekly im- 
pact are the cement which binds to- 
gether consumers, dealers, employees. 
When a "family friend" tells his audi- 
ence each week of the philosophy be- 
hind his product he carries more 
weight than does a flurry of activity 
only when and where public relations 
are strained. 

To mention just two institutional 
programs, neither 21-year-old "Voice 
of Firestone" (which has never devi- 
ated from its original format) nor 
duPont's 14-\ ear-old "Cavalcade of 
America" attempts product sales. The 



latter often mentions products in its 
"better things for better living" pitch 
which are not even available to con- 
sumers. Entertainment-wise they do 
a job. too. Firestone's Hooper for the 
first week of this year was 8.4, du- 
Pont's, 7.1. Average rating of all pro- 
grams for the period was 10.4. 

Even with all these positive points 
met, network is often a tough climb. 
Audiences don't mushroom overnight. 
It takes what one spokesman terms 
"the proper temperament." the main 
ingredient of which is stick-to-it- 
iveness. Johnson's wax had all the 
{/'lease turn to page 47) 



How daytime listenin 

ATLANTA 


<j varies by lova 

High quarter hour 

4.4S p.m. 
12.00 noon 

1 .45 p.m. 

1.00 p.m. 
12.00 noon 
12.00 noon 

2.45 p.m. 
10.30 a.m. 
11.15 p.m. 

9.30 a.m. 
11.30 a.m. 

4.30 p.m. 

Fall-Winter '47-'48. 


lities 

Low quarter hour 

10.30 a.m. 

8.45 a.m. 

9.15 a.m. 

3.15 p.m. 

9.15 a.m. 

8.45 a.m. 

12.45 a.m. 

1.30 p.m. 

10.15 a.m. 

2.15 p.m. 

8.30 a.m. 

8.45 a. m. 


BOSTON 


DES MOINES 


HARTFORD 
INDIANAPOLIS 
MILWAUKEE 
OKLAHOMA 


PEORIA 


PROVIDENCE 


SAN FRANCiSCO 

SPOKANE 

TAMPA 


*Source: Hooper City Reports, 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



19 




THE THREE CHIQUITAS: PATTI CLAYTON, ORIGINAL; ELSA MIRANDA, SPANISH VERSION; MONICA LEWIS, THE CURRENT VOICE 



\o siesta for (Manila 



I low a synthetic 



senorita edneated and expanded the hanana market 



over-all 



( ihiquita Banana. I nited 
Fruit's golden bonanza gal. 
is one of advertising's busiest and best 
liked personalities. 

She has guest starred on the Fred 
Allen. Edgar Bergen, Dinah Shore. 
RCA \ ictor, Coca-Cola, Ellery Queen 
and Alec Templeton programs; ap- 
peared before Ohio State I niversity's 
Institute for Education by Radio; and 
with the Boston Symphon) Orchestra. 

She S tinned up in the Harvard Lam- 
poon and the \ci( Yorker; in the edi- 
torial columns of Time magazine and 
the Christian Science Monitor; seised 
as tbe text of a sermon at the Euclid 



Baptist Church in Cleveland; and was 
parodied to get out the political vote at 
Newton Center, Mass. 

She's hopped to Hollywood for a bit 
part in "This Time for Keeps." with 
Xavier Cugat and Esther Williams. To- 
day she's a movie queen in her own 
right, having appeared in a serie- ol 
80-second Technicolor shorts in 850 
theatres throughout the U. S. During 
the presidential elections, she made her 
informal TV debut, livening up returns 
via CBS-TV in Boston. 

She has lent a helping hand to starv- 
ing kids abroad. To get a plea for 
food relief to (he greatest audience, 



I nited Fruit not onl\ yanked all coin- 
menial announcements, it also added 
80 stations in 38 cities to its regular 
schedule of broadcasts. 

\- this article went to press. Chi- 
quita was worried about the New ^ mk 
water shortage: she recorded a jingle 
along these lines: "Here's Chiquita to 
say something we should remember 
each day. Our H.,0 suppK is getting 
verj low. don't use water unless you 
think \ on oughter." 

She likes to applaud and enhance the 
other fellow's success, and has spent 
considerable time plugging other fruits. 
During National \pple Week, she was 




AFTER ASTRONOMER IN FILM SIGHTS NEW STAR BUT CANT GET IT IN FOCUS, CHIOUITA BRINGS IT IN VIEW. SHE SERVES IT TO HIM, i 



heard over a national hookup with ;i 
jingle starting: 

"I'm Chiquita Banana and I've got 

a beau, 
A chap from North America \oii 

ought to know. 
lli~ name is Mr. Apple, and he has 

such taste, 
He's a fav'rite at whatever table 

he's placed . . ." 
Chiquita, the gal who never rests, 
has done big things for I I'. Demand 
for the company's bananas i- now run- 
ning 20 percent ahead of supply. Vnd 
the company is so sold on Chiquita s 
power to influence listeners and view- 
ers that it has decided to allocate $200,- 

000-$300,000 to Wl and $250,000 to 
TV out of a $1,500,000 advertising 
budget for 1950. This represents a 
$100,000 increase in the broadcasting 
budget over 1949. I Remainder of the 
ad budget is spread over newspapers, 
magazines, motion pictures, cooking 
schools, demonstrations, luncheon serv- 
ices, cooperative advertising, conven- 
tions, and publicity . I 

Here's what motivates Id's whole- 
sale use of Chiquita. as explained In 
R. C. Partridge, advertising manager 
of United Fruit: ll long-range vision 
and planning; 2 I a refreshing adver- 
tising philosophy; 3 l a conviction that 
education can be fun for teacher and 
pupil. 

"We aren't trying to sell bananas in 
place of other fruit." says Mr. Par- 
tridge. "We're trying to do a job for 
the entire industry. The cooperation 
we have received from other fruit and 
food industries, in return for our own. 
is one of the most satisfying results of 
our entire campaign. Too, we aren't 
thinking just of today, but of tomor- 
row. Chiquita and I are having so 
much fun. that even if I had an inde- 
pendent income, I could still enjo\ do- 
ing this job for the sheer love of it. 

All during the years when the Great 
i I'lcase turn to page 40) 








v s r- N - ' ** ' " e n >n a 



cer - 1 " / vi . • • * 

■ - ' m ' >o. can put themmo 

best *or you K »■ z0 ° 

% \ i * * ? : P * - °* ^ 



te /at them 

% t4 : " " ' L 

-t----~T>z---l • ' ~Z~ But- ba- 

p°v- h *d . i ■ - • 

' * ' \ mote of the ve-ry.ve-r> ^ P 

na .na S ^eth.cli-^te J . { „ 



\ ' ' „. a nt 

An - y 

£ i 5 

Its " 




jld ne 



oua-tair- « ft \ 

?>" \ # • _>■ 

j n the re-V 5 e 





UNITED FRUIT COMPANY 



Result of popular demand: Chiquita Banana jingle was printed in 
The American Weekly. 

'THE TiMiP Soul. 



OH-MY- GOSH / I TH/MK I POT 
THOSE Ty-Jo BANANAS in The: 

REFRIGERATOR,' waL^HfRts 

NOTHING To DO &UT OO DOWN 
STAIRS /AMD T/U^jHtAi OUT. 

/ HOP6 I VJONT E?<= Too LATe. 
-JheY MUST HAVE BEEN IN THEf^E 
A FULL HALF- HOUR 




RIDING HIGH WITH A "HEAVENLY" DESSERT 



(M SPITE OF REPEATED RADIO 
WARMINGS, AIR. MILQUETOAST 
HAS A1ADE AN OUTRAGEOUS 
BLUNDER >- 




TV dictionary (or sponsors 



first of three parts 



TV director Herbert True compiles video definitions 



^^ \ new language has been growing. It includes 
:*ntfrf[*T} words from radio, from the theatre, and the 
^^Ifgr motion picture industry — plus newly coined 
words all its own. Words like gizmo, blizzard head, and 
halation (definitions follow). This is the language of 
television. 

I ntil recently the new language had no really complete 
dictionary. Then Herbert True, radio and TV director of 
the Carter Advertising Agency, Inc., in Kansas City, turned 
lexicographer and compiled the list of definitions you will 
find beginning on this page. It is the most authoritative 
list to date. 

True's dictionary will help eliminate confusing syno- 
nyms. Instead of coining their own words to fit new situ- 
ations, director and cameramen will now be able to look 
up the standard terms. 

Trues sources were working members of the industry 
who contributed words and definitions, then made sug- 
gestions for improvements before the dictionary's final 
form was determined (for names see below). 

sponsor presents True's complete dictionary (in this 
and two subsequent issues) for the guidance of its readers. 
Advertisers and agency people who work with TV person- 
nel should find it invaluable. For sponsors who are not 
yet in television, a reading of the terms listed will provide 
a capsule introduction to the new industry. 

The following people were among the consultants and 
sources for Herbert Trues new television dictionary: 

BEULAH ZACHARY, TV Producer Director, J. Walter Thompson 

H. F. DIETER, Manager, TV Department, Foote, Cone and Beldinq 

NORMAN C. LINDOUIST, Director, Malcolm Howard 

WALTER WARE, TV Director, Duane Jones 

CHESTER MacCRACKEN, TV Director, Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield 

MERWIN ELWELL. Art Director, NBC-TV 

LAWRENCE PHILLIPS, Director, Dumont Television Network 

ROY McLAUGHLIN, Manager, WENR-TV 

BEN WAMPLER, Art Director, NBC-TV 

GERRY VERNON, TV Coordinator, ABC-TV 

TED MILLS, NBC-TV Producer "Dave Garroway Show" 

BURR TILLSTROM, Originator "Kukla, Fran and Ollie Show," NBC-TV 

DUANE BOGIE, NBC-TV Director 

DICK STEELE, Stage Manager, NBC-TV 

BILL KOLB, TV Director, Gourfain Cobb 

OSCAR ALAGOOD, Promotion Director, WKY-TV 

CAPT. EDDY, Television Associates 

FRANK MARKS, Chief Engineer, ABC-TV 

SEYMOUR ANDREWS, WBAP-TV 

P. A. SUGG, Manager, WKY-TV 

JACK LIEB, TV Director, Kling Studios 

FRED FREELAND, Ruthrauff and Ryan 

TOM CURTIS, Atlas Film Corporation 

ROBERT CASTERLINE, Chicago Film Studios 

IRVING MACK, Filmack Trailers 

BOB BANNER, Director, NBC-TV 

BILL SCROGGINS, United Film 



ACTION — Any movement that takes place before camera or on 

film. 

ANGLE SHOT — A camera shot taken from any position except 
straight on the subject. 

ANIMATIONS — Mechanical or movable devices which in various 
ways succeed in giving the effect of motion to inanimate or 
still subjects. CARTOON ANIMATION: Animated movies shot 
from cartoon-type drawings. CYCLIC ANIMATION: Set of 
drawings repeated over and over to create action. LIVE ANI- 
MATION: Animation of objects or products. MECHANICAL 
ANIMATION: Drawings made to move with a rig. 

ASPECT RATIO — Proportional relationship of the width of the TV 
picture to the height. In TV as in motion pictures, the aspect 
ratio is 4 to 3. 

AUDIO (1) That part of TV transmission pertaining to sound. 



BACKGROUND — Any material, drops, sets, furniture, etc., used 
behind actors or other foreground subjects. 

BACKGROUND PROJECTION — A special technique whereby a 
wanted scene drawn from stock library is projected on a trans- 
lucent screen which acts as a background for a studio set. 

BCU Extremely narrow angle picture. Big close up. Usually just 

features of a person or a whole subject. 

BLIZZARD HEAD — Any blond. 

BLOOP — A splice bump that causes a dull thud in sound repro- 
duction. 

BLOW-UP — Photographic or photostatic enlargement of written, 
printed or pictorial matter in order that they may be more 
effectively transmitted through TV. 

BOOA4 (2) A mechanical device used for lowering, raising and 

projecting a microphone or a series of microphones. 

BREAK — Time out. Break in rehearsal. 

BREAK Term used by TV director to tell cameramen to move 

camera to another location. 

BRIGHTNESS CONTROL Adjustment on receiver which varies 

amount of illumination of the reproduced image. 

BROADS (3) A unit or battery of incandescent, fluorescent, or 

kleig lights. 

BUCKLING Film entangled in camera or projector because of 

improper threading or heat. 

BUSINESS Minor action or devices used to add atmosphere and 

interest to major theme of program. 

BUSY Describes a setting or background that is too elaborate 

and competes or obscures the viewer's attention from the actors. 



22 



SPONSOR 



CAMERA (4) — Unit containing optical system and light sensitive 
pickup tube which transforms the visual image into electrical 
impulses. 

CAMERA or CUE LIGHT Red reflector light on front of camera 

ana also on top which is on only when the camera is on the air. 

CAMERA REHEARSAL Similar to a dress rehearsal in stage ver- 
nacular where all talent is present and in costume and the 
complete production is shot by cameraman for final checkup 
before telecasting. 

CANS (5) — Receivers and head phones worn by cameramen, stage 
manager, technical director, etc., in the studio and engineers 
on remote. 

CARRIER WAVE Electronic wave over which TV impulses are 

sent. TV utilizes two waves; one for sight, and one for sound. 

CENTERING CONTROL — Adjustments on television receiver or 
monitor for framing the picture properly on TV screen. 

CHANNEL Specific wave lengths "a band of frequencies for 

transmitting TV." 

CIRCLE IN A film effect wherein an image disappears as it is 

replaced by another image from the center out. 

CIRCLE OUT A film effect wherein an image becomes visible as 

it replaces another image from the outside in. 

CIRCULATION Potential audience in terms of families owning 

receivers. One family for all practical purposes regardless of 
the number of sets it owns equals one unit of circulation. 

COAXIAL CABLE — Specially constructed cable used for transmis- 
sion of TV signal because of its low loss of power at higher 
video frequencies. 

COLOR CORRECTION The altering of the tonal value of colored 

objects by the use of filters, lights, shades, etc. 

COMMERCIALS FILM: The commercial recorded on film either 

with sound on film, or silent, or live studio narration. LIVE: 
Acted and narrated directly in front of television camera. 
SLIDES: Still photographs, illustrations or posters, usually used 
as part of a live commercial. COMBINATION: Any combina- 
tion of the above. 

CONTINUITY Usually refers to audio or voice part of TV spot 

or program, but can also mean the complete script. 

CONTRASTS The brightness relationships between the different 

elements of a TV picture. 

CONTRAST CONTROL Adjustments on TV receivers and moni- 
tors for adjusting the range between highlights and shadows 
in picture. 

COSTUME DEFINITION Qualities in texture and design that 

make costumes stand out distinctly from backgrounds and sur- 
rounding objects. 

CROWFOOT Device, usually three-legged, placed under camera 

and tripod to prevent slipping. 

CU Close-up shot. Narrow angle picture. Usually bust or head 

shot of person. 

CUE A signal or sign for the start of shooting, music, narration, 

action, etc. 

CUT An order to stop all action or specific action such as "Stop 

camera." 

CUT A WAX To make a record or disc. 

CUT BACK — To return back to something previously shown. 

CUTTING The elimination of undesirable motion, film or action 

to reach finished product. 



II 



DEFINITION or RESOLUTION — Degree of reproduction of the 
detail of an image, scene, sets and or background after trans- 
mission through complete TV system to receiver or monitor. 

DEPTH OF FOCUS The field before the camera that registers in 

sharp focus. 

DIORAMA Miniature setting usually complete in perspective used 

as a means of establishing large locations, impossible of con- 
struction in the studio. 

DIRECTOR The individual in charge of all composition and action 

in a TV production. 

DIRECT VIEWING RECEIVER Most prominent type of TV re- 
ceiver where picture is viewed directly on the end of the kine- 
scope tube. 

DISH PAN TV slang for the large circular object used in micro- 
wave relay. 

DISSOLVE — The overlapping fadeout of one picture and fade-in 
of another. 




DOLLY A movable carriage usually mounted on 'our wheels, 

which carries either camera, or camera and cameraman. 

DOLLY IN To move in from distance for close up by means of a 

camera mounted on dolly. 

DOLLY OUT — Reverse of dolly in. 

DOLLY SHOT — Shot taken while camera is in motion. 

DRESSER Individual responsible for the delivery, checking, and 

handling of talent's costumes and personal props. 

DRY RUN Those rehearsals previous to camera rehearsals where 

business, lines, sets, etc., are perfected. 

DUB r INC Mixing several sound tracks and recording on a single 

film. 

DUPE — A duplicate negative film print made from a positive. 

(to be continued in next issue) 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



23 




ITS STILL ANYBODY'S RACE IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY, BUT 3ROADCAST ADVERTISING MAY DECIDE THE POSTWAR WINNER 



lulu advertisers can do better 



Shrewd use of radio can spell success for car 

manufacturers in 1950*s tough huvers* market 



/ sliitMilcd auto 


Clfl <\V|*«»1I 


ditures: 1948 


(source; TSARSR) 


MANUFACTURER 


RADIO NET 


NEWSPAPER 


MAG, FARM 
PAPER 


TOTAL 


Chrysler Corp. 


$ 819,297 


$2,341,585 


$4,473,128 


$7,634,010 


Croslcy Motors 


None 


101,704 


145,086 


246,790 


Ford Motor Co. 


1,629,102 


5,763,933 


3,849,177 


11,242,212 


Gen. Motors Corp. 


1,976,769 


15,282,575 


9,293,670 


26,553,014 


Hudson Mot. Car Co. 


None 


1,107,552 


552,472 


1,659,924 


Kaiser-Frazer Corp. 


957,708 


2,808,661 


1,266,165 


5,032,534 


Nash-Kelvinator 


775,449 


844,340 


1,955,330 


3,575,119 


Packard 


None 


1,446,463 


605,363 


2,051,826 


Studebakcr Corp. 


1,049,768 


633,905 


31,586 


1,715,259 


Willys-Overland 


None 


792,796 


918,420 


1,711,216 




$7,208,093' 


$31,123,514** 


$23,090,297*** 


$61,421,904 


Note: Radio totals do not include spot 
exist for total spot radio spending by tr 


expenditures, which are considerable. No 
e automotive industry. 


reliable figures 


*P.I.B. uased or 


i one-time rates 


. Frequency discounts 


balance out talent costs. 


-ted from 1 ' 
♦•♦P.I.B. estimate. 


Records measur 


ements of national advertising. 





over-dh 



Auto manufacturers may 

know .ill lln'ic is I" know 
about making cars, but the\ arc miss- 
ing the bus on broadcast advertising. 
!n this \car of decision in tbe auto- 
motive industry, with all of tbe lead- 
ers struggling for position, a majority 
are handicapping themselves by a 
horse-and-bugg) approach to broadcast 
media which will have a distinct bear- 
ing on tbeir sales records for 1050. 
The question is not onlj "'Are they 
spending enough mone) in radio and 
trlr\ isimi ?", but also "' \rc thej spend- 
in" it judiciousb?" The answer to 
I oth questions, SPONSOR feels, is "no." 
I be sleek new 1050 automobiles 
went on public view a few weeks ago 
like a crop of dew \ -eyed debutantes. 
Vnd like the young ladies of the Blue 



Book, all dI them were lovelj to look 
at and doubtless wonderful to own. 
Yet some will win popularity polls 
while others, perhaps equally desir- 
able, will only be also-rans. There are 
more cars this year than customers. 
Manufacturers have two genteel cuss- 
words for this sad slate id affairs: 
buyers' market. 

In any such situation, advertising 
is usually the decisive factor. The 
honeymoon is over for the automotive 
industry, but the romance is just be- 
ginning. The loved one is the man 
with a fistlul of cash the potential car 
buyer. Yesterday he gol the brushoff. 
but that was \esterday. when car pro- 
duction still lagged far behind demand. 
Present output rates, if maintained. 
are expected to top the all-time peak 
of 1949. when 6,250,000 cars and 
trucks rolled off assembly lines. 

Thus yesterday's sad-sack, the 
would-be car buyer, i> today's hero. 
More than a dozen manufacturers arc 
bowing low and spreading their wares 
before him. How is our hero taking 
all this? He is dazzled, confused, and 
coy. He is sure he wants a new car. 
but which of these beauties should gel 
his nod? It"s a point of delicate bal- 
ance. Intelligent radio advertising 
can tip the scales. 

As it happens, intelligence has not 
been a quality of the automotive indus- 
try's use of radio. The only common 
denominator of current automotive ad- 
vertising on the air is inconsistency. 
The only pattern visible is one resem- 
bling a smashed egg. The \ asl motor- 
car empires, which are among the 
keystone industries of the nation's 
economy, have traditionally ap- 
proached radio with a Milquetoast mix- 
ture of timidity and vacillation. Much 
of this seeming diffidence undoubtedly 
is due to the natural conservatism of 
big outfits dealing in the mass market. 

The automotive industry, in its bare 
50 \ears of existence, has managed to 
clothe itself in such an air of antiquity 
that one might think Detroit and Dear- 
born date from the invention of the 
wheel. Obviously, though, even genu- 
inely great age is no deterrent to suc- 
cessful use of radio — many heavy and 
consistent radio advertisers have been 
in business for over a century I P. 
Lorillard. Curtis Publishing Co., du- 
Pont, etc.). 

In a broad sense, the automotive in- 
dustry over a period of years has mere- 
ly been flirting with radio in much the 
(Please turn to page 50) 



Ford iillftl the air early in lU.'iO 




Action on the Ford Motor CBS-TV production of the "Front Page," a series about the fourth estate 




Peter Donald ("Can You Top This") and Gerald Mohr (Philip Marlowe) are Ford short-termers 




Current automotive broadettst advertising, by types 



MANUFACTURER 


AGENCY 


NET 
RADIO 


SPOT 
RADIO 


NET 
TV 


SPOT 
TV 


Buick 


Kudner 




X 




X 


Chevrolet 


Campbell-Ewald 




X 


X 


X 


Dodge-Chrysler 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 


X 








DeSoto 


BBD&O 




X 






Ford 


J. Walter Thompson 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Lincoln-Mercury 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 




X 


X 




Packard 


Young & Rubicam 




X 


X 




Studebaker 


Roche, Williams & Cleary 




X 






Pontiac 


MacManus, John & Adams 




X 






Old mobile 


D. P. Brother 










Crosley 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 











Kaiser-Frazer 



Hudson 



Morris F. Swaney 

Brooke, Smith, French & Dorrance 



Nash 



Geyer, Newell & Ganger 



Generc! Motors 



Kudner 



Cadillac 
Plymouth 



MacManus, John, Adams 



N. W. Ayer 



Represents use of medium 



yardstick number two 



New mi II study 



reveals you can't judge 1950 listening by 1946 statistics 



BMB radio station cover- 
age data will have given up 
some of its secrets of changed listening 
patterns b) the time this story goes to 
press. Yet much analysis remains be- 
fore the full implications of the 1949 
study begin to take shape. Certain 
trends, however, are already discern- 
ible, as indicated by maps illustrating 
this story. Others will be revealed in 
the text. 

As kits of raw data taken directly 
from the tabulating machines began 
moving to subscribers, the great im- 
portance of certain aspects of the new 
report already stood out clearly. In 
summary, these factors are: 

1. Availability for the first time of 
coverage information on non-subscrib- 
er stations. 

2. More definitive breakdowns of 
listening frequency. 

3. Revelation of numerous changes 
in listening patterns. 

4. More intense interest on the part 
of advertisers and agencies,. 

Numerous agencies and advertisers 
have awaited the new BMB audience 
figures as eagerly as any of the 630 
subscribing stations. Agencies receiv- 



ing the complete subscriber data, un- 
der the BMB plan, are members of the 
American Association of Advertising 
Agencies. 

The Bureau has so far sent over 150 
copies of the report to AAAA agencies 
with radio accounts. Am member, 
however, may receive the complete re- 
ports, free of charge, on request. There 
are 246 member agencies. 

About 190 copies have gone to prin- 
cipal and branch offices of the radio- 
television group of the Association of 
National Advertisers. Just as with 
the AAAA, any ANA member (there 
are about 500 ) may receive a free copy 
of the report by asking for it. The 
AAAAs, ANA, and National Associa- 
tion of Broadcasters are the sponsors 
of Broadcast Measurement Bureau. 

Other advertisers and agencies may 
obtain the regular report on request at 
the cost to BMB of 40c per single copy, 
or $85 for a complete set. 

For the first time non-subscriber 
data are available. Any advertiser (as 
well as any subscriber station) can 
now get a fuller picture of radio cover- 
age in any market than heretofore 
possible with earlier data. 



Only organization authorized to ob- 
tain non-subscriber coverage data 
from BMB are subscribers I stations 
are the only subscribers ) . Therefore, 
to obtain information on a non-sub- 
scribing outlet, any agency or adver- 
tiser I including AAAA and ANA mem- 
bers I must obtain it through a sub- 
scriber-station. 

Any advertiser, agency, or station 
can call on BMB for aid in analyzing 
data of special interest. BMB will 
make studies involving special tabula- 
tions of any station or group of sta- 
tions. This will be done at cost. 

Cost of coverage information for 
non-subscribing stations depends on 
the number of radio homes credited to 
each station. The fee runs from $50 
for an outlet with a weekly audience 
of 50,000 families to $450 for an audi- 
ence of 3.000,000. Each home is rep- 
resented by an IBM card. Only a few 
stations have audiences totaling 3.000.- 
000 or more. 

The most significant refinement of 
the new report is the breakdown of 
weekly listening into three categories 
instead of the single one time or often- 
er listing in the 1946 study. In addition 



Cheek of 133 BWK "I -state" stations* shows gains over 1946 

No. of stations (each dash represents one station) 

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 



% 


of ga 


n 


4 


71 to 


75 


. 


66 to 70 


• 


61 to 


65 


+ 


56 to 


60 


• 


51 to 


56 


. 


46 to 50 




41 to 


45 


* 


36 to 40 


* 


31 to 


35 


* 


26 to 


30 


1 


21 to 


25 


1 


16 to 


20 


( 


1 1 to 


15 


• 


6 to 


10 


r 


to 


5 




1 to 


5 




6 to 


10 




II to 


IS 




16 to 


20 


— 


21 to 


25 



Stations whose BMB counties are all within a 
state (mainly low wattage in-town stations). 



Faetors That Xffeet BtIB 
Station Ratings 

As listed by KENNETH H. BAKER. Acting 
President, Broadcast Measurement Bureau 

INTERNAL FACTORS 

1. Change in ownership or management 

2. Changes in facilities (physical: power; fre- 
quency) 

3. Change in network 

EXTERNAL FACTORS 

1. Impact of new stations in service area 

2. Effect on signal from new stations on same 
or adjacent channel 

3. Effect of FM stations (largely unknown) 

4. Effect of TV stations (largely unknown) 



1.916 

r 



Example of daytime Increase 



19 tit 




KLV 



GUS ALLEGHANY 



STEUBEN 

o 



SCHUY- 






CHE- 



W YORK 



i 



10 



CHLMUN6 



GROWING POPULARITY OF ITS NETWORK (CBS) HELPED INCREASE DAYTIME LISTENERS TO WHEC, ROCHESTER, N. Y., BY 16% 



to the 1-2 listing, the 1949 breakdown 
includes listening on a basis of 3-4-5 
and 6-7 days a week. The figures are 
tabulated for both day and night lis- 
tening, and coverage maps, which are 
now following the raw data already in 
the hands of subscribers, will show 
day and night coverage patterns sep- 
arated las in maps on this page). 

The figures in the three frequency- 
of-listening columns add up to a sta- 

1946 



tion's total weekl) audience. Ibis fig- 
ure is directly comparable to the total 
weekly audience figure in the first 
stud\. hut the new breakdown is more 
definitive. Two stations, for example, 
might each have a weekly audience of 
.">(>',. It could make a big difference to 
an advertiser whether the greater pro- 
portion of the audience in either case 
were 1-2, 3-4-5, or 6-7 times a week 
listeners. It wasn't possible to deter- 

/ v(Mii|Wc of iii<;/if rime Increase 



mine this from the 1946 report. 

The new study does not, however, 
report the average daily audience for 
any station. BMB believes it should 
report only listening facts. In the eyes 
of many subscribers a calculated "av- 
erage daily audience" is too interpre- 
tive. BMB also had a feeling that to 
report such a figure might in the eyes 

(Please turn lo j>age 59) 

19 1.9 




rT <£*<& 



A POWER INCREASE FROM 5 KW TO 50 KW JUMPED NUMBER OF LISTENERS TO WLAW. LAWRENCE, MASS., BY 317080 (179%) 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



27 



10,000 

WATTS 



WNEW 

Gr<«t*r Nf* York fer oa *fe« »*b*f Co'p. 



1130 

ON YOUR 0IA1 



GENERAL BROADCASTING TIME RATES 

Workday? 6 o m to midnight, Sunday* 7 a m to midnight 
(Exctpt MAKE BELIEVE BALLROOM) 

1 p*r w»*>k 2 p*r w*«k 3 p*r w*«k 4 per w S *k 5 p+i w*«k A par — ••* 

One hour $500 00 $1000 00 $127500 $1600.00 $1875 00 $2100.00 

On«-hoH hour 30000 ' 'j^ijrviiitetftiBMMWBWFi^Mttti i» 

One-quorter ho^^,^^^ 

300 00 382.50 480.00 562.50 65 




\ AM A SilJ.rWP.M. 

Available T^f^6 times weekly in 15-minute periods (or 10 minutes following 
news). Minimum contract 13 weeks. 

Three times o week $712.50 Six times a week $1,275. 00 

DISCOUNTS: 26 consecutive weeks 5% 52 consecutive weeks 15% 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

One minute or less, live or transcribed $60.00 

Milkman's Matinee $20.00 

Make Believe Ballroom station-break cut-ins, 25 words live $60.00 

DISCOUNTS: 100 times 5% 250 rimes 10% 500 times 15% 

Announcement discounts must be earned within the period of one year. 



Time rates are pared drastically after midnight at station WNEW 




Phil McLean dispenses the hot, late licks for WJLB, Detroit's "1400 Club' 



After Idniglil 



ISig-tiine advertisers ean 
cash in on small-hours programing 



\ growing number of wide- 
awake advertisers are cash- 
^y ing in on the sleeplessness 
of several million radio listeners. The 
after-midnight or all-night show, far 
from being a fleeting phenomenon, is 
solidh rooted and developing Lustily. 
The stay-update audience is apparent l\ 
here to stay. And it's a hig. well-heeled. 
loyal audience, that can l>e sold for a 
fraction of the cost of standard-hours 
radio in man) cases for only one- 
half the usual rate. 

Just how big is this audience'.'' In 
the New 'i oik area alone it s computed 
as < Lose to a half million. Elsewhere 
it's bigger than most advertisers think. 
Of course, an advertiser doesn't reach 
(ill those potential customers unless he 
buys lime on all of the after-midnight 
stations, whose total post-midnighl au- 
diences were lumped to reach those fig 
ures. It > Likelier that he II Inn one 
station, or just a few. ui the outset. 
Thai being the case, his best source of 
information on coverage is the station 
itself, or its national representative. 



Practically every station which broad- 
casts after midnight has coverage facts 
and figures available on its post-mid- 
night audience, as distinct from the 
standard-hours operation. 

The radio advertiser who folds his 
tent at 10:30 or 11 p.m. and silentl) 
steals away is turning his back on a 
multi-million dollar market, whose po- 
tentialities have barelj been scratched. 
The list ol firms which have used the 
after-midnight air with notable success 
includes all sizes and shapes — from a 
* "hole-in-the-wall ' restaurant in \\ ald- 
ington. 1). C. to "the worlds largest 
store," New York's I!. II. Mac) & Co. 
Product-wise, the list runs from mink 
coats (I. J. Fox. Inc. i to chewing gum 
I Win. Wrigle) Jr. do. I to razor blades 
(Marlin) to beer (Budweiser). Some 
others are Philco Distributors, Para- 
dise Wines. Roma Wines. Virginia 
Dare \\ ines, RCA \ ictor, Bulova, 
Schaeffer Beer. Breyer's Ice Cream. 
Strauss Stores, (The Pep Boys) B. C. 
Remed) < '.<>.. Stanback, and the Illinois 
Meal ( !o. Ml ol these concei ns lu\ e .1 



firm grip on the principles ol profit 
and loss, and none is given to scatter- 
ing its advertising dollars around with 
abandon. 

The fact that after-midnight radio is 
not peculiar to any one section of the 
country is evident from a glance at the 
partial station list: WWDC. Washing- 
ton; WIP. Philadelphia; WJR, De- 
troit; KPRO, Riverside, Cal.; WOR 
and WNEW. New York; KFEL, Den- 
ver: \\\<>E. New Orleans; KXLA, 
Pasadena. Cal.; WPAT, Paterson, N. 
J.: WKIiW. Buffalo: WCKY, Cincin- 
nati: KGFJ, Hollywood. 

\moii". the main widespread mis- 
conceptions about the after-midnight 
audience is the notion that it's made 
up Largely of barflies, cab drivers, and 
nighl watchmen. Surveys show that 
such nocturnal types </<> listen to the 
all-night shows but the) are greatl) 
outnumbered bv those who listen at 
home. A Pulse survey fo. WNEW dis- 
closed that nine out of ten Listeners to 

'"Milkman's Matinee" one of the old- 
est all-niehters tune in at home. 



28 



SPONSOR 




Vfter midnight the disc jockey is king: Alan Cummings, WWDC, Washington 



Art Ford is record hero of "Milkman's Matinee," WNEW, New York 



Win arc all these householders 
astir in the tiny hours? For am num- 
ber of reasons, most of them legitimate. 
A great many people just hate going 
to bed at an orthodox hour, and put il 
off as long as possible. And then there 
are the insomniacs- -a sizable group in 
any community who sta\ awake be- 
cause they have no alternative. I This 
group is one of the hards cores of the 
average all-night audience.) Outside 
the home, there are thousands of per- 
sons who spend the night hours not 
in kicking the gong around but in 
blameless labor. 

The latter group includes, in addi- 
tion to the cabbies and night watch- 
men, such solid types as bakers, photo 
engravers, building maintenance crews. 
railroad, airline, and bus terminal em- 
ployes. The night shift has become a 
permanent part of the American indus- 



trial scene. Thus, on the job or at 
home, it is no longer a sj mptom of 
eccentricity or turpitude to be up and 
about at 2. 3, 4. or 5 a.m. 

The booming sale of small radios 
and portables in recent \ ears has add- 
ed vasth to the after-midnight audi- 
ence. Millions of families have two or 
more sots in the house, which nun be 
placed strategically for early-hour lis- 
tening without disturbing sleepers. 
Portable radios are often taken to work 
at office or factory along with the cof- 
fee thermos and sandwiches. 

Among other data on the kind of 
people who listen to the radio after 
midnight, contained in the Pulse studv 
for WNEW, was the disclosure that 
more than half of them in the survey 
group were men — 55.79? of ine total. 
This is in marked contrast to the usual 
radio audience, which is predominant- 



ly female. "Milkman's Matinee'" listen- 
ers are youngish - more than 7<V i 
were under 40 at the time of the Pulse 
poll — and make more money than the 
average citizen. Most of them had 
progressed beyond the wage scale 
which entails clock-punching at 8:30 
a.m. or thereabouts. Thus the) were 
able to sta\ up later listening to their 
radios. More important, their average 
buying power was far greater than that 
of the budget-ridden housewife, for in- 
stance, who is the mainstay of daytime 
radio. 

An earlier stud) of the after-mid- 
night audience, made 1>\ C.rosslev. Inc., 
at the beginning of the war. foreshad- 
owed mam of the listening trends il- 
luminated b\ the Pulse report. I be 
Crossle\ survej covered three urban 
but non-metropolitan centers in addi- 
I Please turn to page 55) 




KFEL KILOCYCLE CLUB 

KKl • DENVER • 950 KILOCYCLES 
II P. M. TO 5 A. M. DAILY 

Thanks tor letting ui know you'd like to join our KFEL KILOCYCLE CLUB — 
— we'll be glad to have you — just fill out the attached application blank and 
mail it back to us. We'll send your membership card and enroll you right away 
and — THIS IS IMPORTANT — please fill out completely your "membership 
classification." We'll have many features of special interest to the various age 
groups and listening hours of our members and the "classification" will help us 
know what you're most interested in. 

Tkoaki again and f'.EASE keep llstenln' 



To Doug and Willie Taylor: 

I hereby apply for full membership in the KFEL KILOCYCLE CLUB with the under- 
standing that my only obligation as a member shall be to listen at least once a week 
between the hours of I I P.M. and 5 A.M. — and that I shall never be charged any 
dues or assessments for this membership 



NAME- 
CITY— 



ADDRESS.. 



_ZONE 



STATE. 

















1 


Male 


MEMBERSHIP CLASSIFICATION 

i Please check completely 1 


=t AM 


1 am i 
Teens. 


n m V : 1 1 tn 1 ? P M ?t„ 






20-« 
30'< 




5 AM 







DENVER STATION TAPS LISTENERS FOR MEMBERSHIP IN "KFEL KILOCYCLE CLUB" VIA POSTCARD PLEDGE TO TUNE IN AT LEAST WEEKLY 

13 FEBRUARY 1950 29 






Nation's leaders will attend 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 

premiere 1 March 



First to request film showings 

Maurice B. Mitchell, director of the Broadcast Advertising Bureau, 
who as secretary of the All-Radio Presentation Committee is helping spark 
the LIGHTNING THAT TALKS project, has released a list of markets in which 
showings of the film have already been scheduled. Dates had not yet been 
assigned as this issue went to press. 



New Yorlc 
Los Angeles 
San Francisco 
Philadelphia 
Boston 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Huntington, W. Va. 
Canon City, Colo. 
Silver City, N. M. 
Keene, N. H. 
Provo, Utah 
Honolulu, T. H. 
Fayettoville, Ark. 
Osceola, Ark. 
Macomb, III. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Lafayette, Ind. 
Cedar Rapids, la. 
Garden City, la. 
Hopkinsville, Ky. 
Lexington, Ky. 
Macon, Ga. 
Gastonia, N. C. 
Columbia, Tenn. 
Bogalusa, La. 



Charlotte, N. C. 
Asheboro, N. C. 
Santa Barbara, Cal. 
San Rafael, Cal. 
Spokane, Wash. 
Salem, Ore. 
Missoula, Mont. 
Aberdeen, Wash. 
Eugene, Ore. 
San Jose, Cal. 
Livingston, Mont. 
Sioux Falls, S. D. 
Sweetwater, Tex. 
Deadwood, S. D. 
Grand Junction, Colo. 
Casper, Wyoming 
St. Johnsberry, Vt. 
Ware, Mass. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Fulton, N. Y. 
McKeesport, Pa. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Lexington, Va. 
Brockton, Mass. 



Minneapolis 
New Orleans, La. 
Baton Rouge, La. 
Indianapolis 
Nashville 

Kansas Citv, Mo. 
Denver, Colo. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Providence, R. I. 
Canton, O. 
Cleveland 

Battle Creek, Mich. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Kalispell, Mont. 
Fort Dodge, la. 
Newport, R. I. 
Iowa City, la. 
Marinette, Wis. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Lawton, Okla. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Lewiston, Me. 
Hornell, N. Y. 



' ■•"■ « New \ ork's famous Wal- 
dorf-Astoria has formed 
the backdrop for many im- 
portant events and person- 
ages during its glittering history. But 
probably none of those events held as 
much significance for as many people 
interested in radio as the one scheduled 
for 1 March — the premiere of light- 
ning that talks. This full-length doc- 
umentary film will portray graphically 
the vital role of radio in American life 
and the effectiveness of radio as a sales 
medium. 

The Waldorf premiere will be fol- 
lowed by local showings in some 430 
communities throughout the U. S., 
with local stations acting as hosts to 
audiences of business and civic lead- 
ers. The initial showing in New York 
will have the showmanship of a Holly- 
wood premiere. A blue-ribbon audi- 
ence of 1.200 has been invited to at- 
tend. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower is 
tentatively scheduled to deliver a dis- 
tinguished layman's forecast of what 
lies ahead of the radio industry during 
l lie 2<>th century. Later, top radio pro- 
I Please turn to page .">') 1 



JO 



SPONSOR 



Use the 2 best persuaders 
West of the Pecos 




to cover the 2 biggest markets in the West 

Economy, Complete Coverage, 25 Years of Successful Selling- 
All Yours with these Key Stations of DON LEE-the Nation's 
Greatest Regional Network. 




Represented Nationally by 
JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



31 



4 









100 



I 




.1 




■ 



The 




m® 



is built-in 




There are two pictures on this page: 
the one you are looking at; and the one 
they are looking at (which you can't see). 

To you the important picture is the people 
in front of the television screen. It is a 
picture of the special impact achieved only 
by this medium, yet which goes far 
beyond the novelty of television. 

But we are equally concerned with the 
picture on the screen. For it is the result of 
creative programming which alone can 
sustain this kind of impact ... building into 
every program the magic that holds the 
largest audiences week in and week out. 

It is now clear that CBS is the richest 
source of such programming in television 
today; that CBS consistently has more 
of the most popular programs than any 
other network; and thai most ol these 
programs have been created or produced 
by the Columbia Broadcasting System. 

This picture of television's impact is a 

picture any advertiser can create— 

but he needs the magic of CBS to hold it. 

CBS TELEVISION 



Check Your 
Southeastern List 

Ca refully 

BE SURE 

to include the 
station that — 



Has more daytime cov- 
erage area than any 
other 5,000 unit station 
in the entire Southeast! 



: — 



Not only completely 
covers its home market 
one of the Nation's 
first 150 — but reaches 
and sells a vast rural au- 
dience as well in its 
total Georgia-South 
Carolina area! 



Offers as its best recom- 
mendation a large list of 
the Nation's leading ad- 
vertisers regularly 
reaching WGAC's 83.000 
farm and 75,000 urban- 
small town families. 



ADVERTISERS 

Are making new sales 
records on 



WGAC 

580 Kc. - ABC - 5,000 Watt* 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

Avery Knodcl 



34 



RTS . . . S PONSOR REPORTS... 



-continued from page 2- 

Additional funds for BAB's 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 

Additional funds from 25 new subscribers to the 
All-Radio film have raised BAB total receipts to 
$140,000. Surplus money will be used to make extra 
prints for conventions, dealer meetings, and other 
groups of national importance. 

Zenith to increase 
TV set production 

After it stops manufacturing automobile radios, 
Zenith will use plants to expand television set 
production. For fiscal year ending 30 April 1949, 
automobile radio sales totaled $77,146,861. 

American consumer in 
good financial shape 

The American consumer has plenty of purchasing 
power. Despite record spending in post-war era, 
last year individuals owned $132,000,000,000 in 
liquid assets; $20,000,000,000 in currency. 

TV sets flood country 

There are too many sets on the market. Many brands 
have been forced to cut profit margins to the bone. 
Overstocked TV dealers took big losses on 1949 
models. Most 1950 sets are selling for 20 percent 
less. 

Premiums aid soap 
sales in '49 

Lever Brothers considers the increased use of 
premiums major factor in boosting soap and detergent 
sales last year. Nation used 505,000,000 more pounds 
in 1949 than 1935-39 average ; an increase of 16 
percent . 

Free offer of TV's ten 

most successful film commercials 

Advertisers and agencies can study ingredients of 
ten successful TV commercials in special film pre- 
pared by Sarra, Inc., N. Y. 

Music Libraries are 
growing and growing 

There's nothing small about radio station music 
libraries. Impetus of saleability of library- 
prepared scripts is one cause of substantial 
growth. Lang-Worth has grown from $1,000,000 in 
1946 to $3,500,000 in 1949. World, Associated, 
Standard, Capitol, RCA Thesaurus are all doing 
boom business. 

SPONSOR 







The prairie wagon which carried goods 

and settlers to California . . . the 

original "Snowshoe Express," 10-foot 

skis with a single pole . . . the Hangtown 

stagecoach which ran the tortuous 

course from Hangtown (Placerville) to 

Carson City ... an engine reminiscent 

of those which met at Promontory Point 

for the Golden Spike ceremony ... an 

early San Francisco cable car . . . 



owo BTCJ 



a 



I 



5J3" 



i| o|o|o 



i oooo » 



I 



the old paddle-wheeler on the 

Sacramento River. These were familiar 

sights in the early days of northern 

California. Today 28-year-old KNBC 

is as familiar to the people of 

northern California as were the wagons 

and steamboats of the 1850's. It is 

northern California's best buy. 




THE STATION OF 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 



50,000 WATTS 



680 K. C. 




Represented by INBC Spot Sales 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



35 





Mr. Wilds 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Bennett 

According to re- 
cently published 
figures, spot ra- 
dio showed an 
increase of over 
$7,000,000 in the 
\ ear 1949 as com- 
pared to 1948. 
\A large part of 
\f this figure is, no 

doubt, accounted 
for bv the fact 
that new products, such as the anti- 
histamines, made their first public ap- 
pearance. However, two other factors 
were uiiflouhtedlv important in making 
1949 the peak year, so far. for spot 
radio, namely : 1 I the uncertainly of 
business as to actual sales potential, 
coupled with the exit of the so-called 
"".seller's market" and the entrance of 
the "buyer's market"; 2) television. 

At the start of 1949, many national 
advertisers were unwilling to commit 
themselves to large and inflexible ad- 
vertising budgets until they had more 
indication of what kind of business 
year 1949 would turn out to be for 
their products. As the year wore 
on, labor problems were mainly ad- 
justed satisfactoril) and sales, 1>\ and 
large, seemed to be holding up fairly 
well, with the exception of certain cities 
or regions where increased local com- 
petition was forcing down the sales 
curve of the national ad\ ertisers. I he 
obvious remedy was to increase the ad- 
vertising effort in such markets in or- 
del I" gel a larger share of local sales. 
Consequently, -pot radio as well as 



Mr. Sponsor asks... 



"What are the factors contributing to the 
increased use of spot radio?** 



Harry W. Bennett 



Advertising Manager, Jelke Good 
Luck Products Division, Lever Brothers 



newspaper lineage benefited. 

Likewise at the start of 1949, many 
advertisers were experimenting with 
television and were reluctant to com- 
mit themselves heavily in other direc- 
tions until they were satisfied that this 
medium had been given a thorough 
trial. At the same time, most of the 
advertisers in this category were fully 
aware of the fact that television alone 
could not give their products the neces- 
sary support, and consequently, they 
turned to spot radio as a means of 
supplementing their television cover- 
age in many markets. 

To sum up. spot radio showed itself 
as being extremely flexible, and this 
flexibility was just what many adver- 
tisers needed in 1949. That this qual- 
ity is extremely important seems to 
have been recognized by two of the 
networks, at long last, in the recent 
short-term deal with Ford for a large 
number of sustaining programs; it is 
my opinion that an awareness and ap- 
preciation of the flexibility of spot ra- 
dio by everyone concerned cannot but 
help make 1950 a banner year. 

Charlks M. Wilds 
Timebuyer 
l\. W. Ayer 
New ) orh 

Certainly 1949 
was an interest- 
ing year for those 
of us in radio. 
One of the out- 
standing trends 
was the increase 
in use of daytime 
spol radio by 
both large and 
small advertisers. 
In the case of 
the daytime spots 
weie used lo supplemenl the nighttime 




Mr. Burbach 

large advertisers, 



network programs, while the small ad- 
vertiser centered his entire appropria- 
tion around the use of spots. 

During 1949 network evening time 
became scarce and the rating picture 
became more competitive, with the re- 
sult that even good network programs 
found it difficult to maintain the prcv i- 
ous high ratings enjoyed during the 
war and post-war years. The shilt~ ol 
major programs from one network to 
another completely changed the eve- 
ning network rating picture, not only 
in the major markets, hut in the smaller 
outlets as well. Thus, some advertisers 
dropped their programs and purchased 
spots during the day in order to try to 
capture a completely new audience. 
Such advertisers as cigarette companies 
and beer and soap manufacturers went 
into da\time spots, with monev saved 
b\ dropping a low-rated evening pro- 
gram. 

The advertiser with a limited hudget 
purchased more spots because he could 
enter spot agreements and get good 
adjacencies to the increasingly popular 
daytime shows, and at the same time 
take advantage of the change in trend 
of listeners from one network to an- 
other. The small advertiser could not 
tie up too much money in advance dur- 
ing 1949 and. thus, could advantage- 
ously use spot on a two-week cancella- 
tion basis thereby not tying up his 
advertising plans for an expensive 13- 
week cvcle. 

It is mv hope that 195(1 will result 
in the spoken and visual advertising 
media reaching all time highs, whether 
it he network or spot. Mv slogan now 
is. "Radio and television look nifty 
for 1950." 

George M. Bi rba< h, Jr. 
Asil VP — radio and T) 
Federal Advertising Agency 
Vet* York 



V, 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Kemp 



\\ hether the use 
<>l spol radio is 

actualK increa>- 
ing i- a debatable 
point. \ number 
uf i i meb uyers 
h a \ !• rxpn\-~cd 
the n|>inii>n that 
it i- easier to birj 
s ]> o t announce- 
ments current!) 
than it was, say, 
three years ago. However, there are 
many reasons for the use of spot at 
am time ami especially at the present. 
One reason, which is probably tem- 
porary, is a reflection ot current busi- 
ness conditions. Main advertisers arc 
reluctant to make the large-scale, long- 
term commitments necessary for the 
use of network radio and have, there- 
fore, turned to spot. I helieve that net- 
works have recognized this particular 
condition, and some of them have re- 
centlx abandoned or modified the long- 
standing network polic) ol selling lime 
onlj on a 13-week cycle base. 

Another reason for the use of spot 
is its flexibility. Spot radio permits the 
advertiser to vary his advertising pres- 
sure by seasons of the year and by 
geographic areas. In some cases ad- 
vertisers desire to concurrently pro- 
mote different products in different 
areas. The high cost of network cut- 
ins makes this difficult to do on the 
networks hut it is a simple process 
when spot radio is used. National ad- 
vertisers are also turning increasingly 
to the use of spot radio to supplement 
regular network efforts in areas where 
there are special marketing problems 
or where network coverage is, for one 
reason or another, weak. 

TV will have an increasing effect of 
the use of spot. It is to be expected that 
as large advertisers take over the spon- 
sorship of network TV programs, they 
will use spot Tadio to round out adver- 
tising support in non-TV areas. It 
may he. of course, that all networks 
will modify network requirements in 
such a fashion as to permit this type of 
complementary radio advertising to be 
done on a network basis. 

Finally, improved sales methods em- 
ployed b\ local stations and their rep- 
resentatives have resulted in the use of 
spot radio b\ an increased number of 
local ami regional advertisers. 

Frank B. Kemp 

Ass'l Media Dirrctm 
Com pi mi Advertising 
New } orl; 




pL£NTy WHEN YOU'RE SELLING CHICAGO 
AND 251 KEY MID-WESTERN COUNTIES ONWCFL! 

Your sales story on WCFL goes out to Chicago and 251 Key-Counties 
in 5 rich, middle-western states. This actual audience coverage is based 
on a 30,000 letter-pattern. 

8,289,763 consumers in the primary! 5,421,020 in the secondary! 

A POTENTIAL $15,000,000,000 ANNUAL MARKET 

As the Voice oj Labor, WCFL has a special tie with the well-paid craftsman 
and wage-earners in this prosperous, industrial area. 

For full information, contact WCFL or The Boiling Company. 



WCFL 

50,000 watts • 1 000 on the dial 

The Voice of Labor 

666 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, III. 

Represented by the Boiling Company, Inc. 

An ABC Affiliate 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



37 



GIFT SHOP 



OFFICE SUPPLIES 



SPONSOR: Casa Elsasser AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Senor Don Casa is a 

confirmed TV user after these gratifying results. Some 
weeks ago, on Shopper's Guide, an imported English out- 
door toy was advertised. The cost of the spot teas $20 but 
within three days of the announcement, ten toys were 
sold at $32 each. In any language 320 for 20 is a good 
return. And adds Senor Don Casa, "The prestige of being 
a television advertiser is in itself north the cost of adver- 
tising in this great medium." 

«'I'\J. Miami PROGRAM: Spots 



SPONSOR: Fastener Corp. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This firm, selling pen- 

size Duo-Fast pocket staplers, was able to nail up a 
very favorable sales record with the aid of TV. Six spots 
were used on the Dr. Fixum Show, and during this time 
Marshall Field & Co. was the retailer. During the four 
weeks that the department store had this product on hand, 
they sold out completely three times. Proving once again. 
TV can sell anything that's ivorth buying. 



WENR-TV, Chicago 



PROGRAM: Spots 



TV 

results 



III !• US I MIM STOKE 



SPONSOR: D. H. Holmes Co. \GENCY: Direct 

CA1 -SULE CASE HISTORY : Here is food for thought 

for potential 77 advertisers. This New Orleans depart- 
ment store recently allocated one commercial on its regu- 
lar variety program to its catering department. Following 
the telecast, orders were received for complete catering 
service at seven social functions. All seven callers said 
that until they had seen the video plug they were unaware 
that the store offered such a service. Further proof to the 
Holmes Company that it pays to advertise — on video! 



WDSU-TV, New Orleans 



PROGRAM: Variety Sho* 



\l Hmoitll 1 S 



SPORT STORE 



SPONSOR: Coker-Butler \GI \< 1 : Dir.-.-i 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When this Pontine agen- 

cy was taken over, the new owners thought TV advertis- 
ing would be too costly. However, they bought two one- 
minute spots per week for three months at $27 each and 
two film spots at $65 each. The immediate result was a 
20 percent increase in service department business with 
a new building erected to handle, the extra business. Now 
the owners say: "We feel we have achieved our goal at a 
cost cheaper than that afforded by other media. 



WKY-TV, Oklahoma City 



PROGRAM: Spots 



TOYS 



SPONSOR: Chicago's Last Sports Store AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This store is located 15 

miles from Chicago's Loop in a wilderness of industrial 
plants but here is their amazing TV story. In less than 
ten weekly telecasts of 45 minutes in length, every item 
visually advertised on the program was sold out within 
five days of the telecast. Store traffic increased 40 per- 
cent. Customers appeared from towns in a radius of 200 
miles of Chicago. All this with the store so far removed 
from the center of things; but video brings them in. 



WBKB, Chicago 



PROGRAM: Wrestling 



PAPI-.H LOO OS 



SPONSOR: Meyei S Thalheimer \GENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Toys were in the TV 

spotlight in this instance. Two of the principal items were 
the Schilling talking doll, a $12.05 item, and the Hansel 
Ox Crete! marionette show for $5.98. The store sold 660 
dolls and could have sold more if they'll been available. 
The marionette slum sold to the tune of 40 dozen. Not 
only was this a sell-out but. department store officials 
report, it resulted in a 50 percent increase ovet previous 
l<>\ sales. 



W BAL, Baltimore 



PROGRAM: Spots 



SPONSOR: Home Containers Corp. AGENCY: Guild, Bascom 

& Bonfigli 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: These manufacturers of 

Press-2-Seal fresherators relied solely on TV to bring 
in the sales and they were not disappointed. As a result 
of a one-month test campaign and no other media used, 
the firm reported a side of almost 10.000 units. The com- 
pany says the results of the TV demonstration were 
astonishing since the 40,000 units were distributed in 
<>nl\ 150 stores. The firm rs nou sold on video. 

KGO-TV, KRON-TV 8 KIM\. S.F. PROGRAM: Spots 




The always-rich Wilmington market has heartily 

welcomed the only television station located in the state of 

Delaware — WDEL-TV — on the air since June 30, 

1949. Viewers are enthusiastic about this, their own 

television station. Already, tuning \\ DEL-T\ is a 

fixed habit — and set sales are showing a tremendous growth 

every month. This is due to the clearer picture this 

local outlet hrings, the resourceful and varied local 

programming and NBC network shows, lie sure your sales 

story is effectively seen and heard in the W ilmington 

market where residents enjoy far above average per 

capita income — fifth in the nation. Enjoy as do 

many foremost advertisers, new. profitable business this 

year from selling on WDEL-TV. ^ rite for information. 



Represented by Robert .Meeker Associates 

CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK LOS ANGELES 



STEINMAN STATIONS 
CLAIR R. McCOLLOUGH, General Manager 

WGAL WGAL-TV WGAL-FM WDEL WDEL-TV WDEL-FM 

Lancaster, Pa. Wilmington, Del. 

WKBO WRAW WORK WEST WEST-FM 

Horrisburg, Pa. Reading, Pa. York, Pa. Easton, Pa. 




TV- AFFILIATE 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



39 



CHIQUITA 

{Continued horn pai^r J I i 

While Fleet was in war service, long- 
range thinking was going on in the 
I nited Fruit conference room at Piei 
3. North River, New ^ ork. Ships were 
not available to move the banana crop, 
but the far-flung plantations were kept 
free from jungle growth against the 
da) when they could produce again. 

Bananas are an excellent baby food. 
I he bab) crop would sprout after the 
war. UF reasoned that the demand for 
bananas would top the normal pre-wai 



volume oi L00,000,000 hunches a year. 
i That is still the volume shipped, but 
improved agricultural methods have in- 
creased the weight, i 

'T>\ mid-summer of "44," Mr. Par- 
tridge said, "'the war clouds were lift- 
ing and we felt that we should get 
started on our educational job. We all 
agreed people hate to do things because 
'it - good lor you.' But it was impor- 
tant that consumers know two things: 
bananas make best eating when they 
are flecked with brown: to get them 
that wa\ the\ should be allowed to 
ripen at room temperature. 

"\\ e had done radio advertising pre- 



COVERS 



ONLY ONE STATION 

THE SOUTH BEND MARKET - 

AND WHAT A MARKET! 



Right! Only WSBT covers the great 

South Bend market. No other station, Chicago 

or elsewhere, even comes close. Look at the 

latest Hooper — look at any Hooper — 

for eloquent proof. 

The South Bend market is far-reaching, 
prosperous, and growing fast. Its heart is two 
adjoining cities — South Bend and Mishawaka — 
with a combined population of 157,000. 
Total population of the entire South Bend 
market is over half-a-million. Total retail sales 
in 1948 exceeded hd\(-z-billion dollars! 
The rest of WSBT's primary area gives you 
another million people who spent 911 million 
dollars in retail purchases in 1948. 

You must cover the South Bend market. You 
do cover it with WSBT— and only with WSBT. 







5000 WATTS • 960 KC • CBS 
PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

40 



viously. Before, and during the earlv 
part of the war, we sponsored 'The 
World Toda\'. a 15-minute newscast 
on the CBS network. We had also 
sponsored sporadic spot campaigns 
and, particularly, participation in wom- 
en's homemaking programs— always on 
an educational basis. This time we 
were prepared to make our educational 
approach more personal, and to spend 
more money than ever before to back 
an extensive. highh integrated and 
hard-hitting campaign." 

UF took its problem to BBU&O. In 
September, two slightly groggy \oung 
men emerged from the music room 
with Chiquita Banana. Garth Mont- 
gomery, lyricist, handed the script to 
a vocal office girl, swept a handful of 
paper clips into a Dixie cup to simulate 
a maraca, and composer Len MacKen- 
zie whammed out the catchy score. 

The agenc\ went overboard. So did 
IF when orchestra leader Ray Bloch 
and Patti Clayton, the original Chi- 
quita. put on a dress rehearsal and 
gave out with : 

"I'm Chiquita Banana and I've 
come to say 

Bananas have to ripen in a cer- 
tain way . . . 

Bananas like the climate of the 
very, very tropical equator, 

So you should never put bananas 
in the refrigerator . . ." 
Listeners to the jingle, aired on 75 
stations, were more reserved. "For 
six months." Partridge recalls, "noth- 
ing much happened. Then a woman 
phoned, begging for a record of the 
jingle, even a cracked one. She was 
worn out dialing around all da\ trying 
to catch Chiquita for her youngster." 

After that, things began to happen 
in the volume indicated at the begin- 
ning of this article. 

By November. 1945, the jingle was 
being heard over 138 stations in the 
l. S. in 55 markets: and over 24 sta- 
tions in Canada in 21 markets, five of 
which used a French version which the 
agency produced and Chiquita learned 
and recorded in Montreal. 

I'eak radio advertising was reached 
during 1945 and 1946 when the jingle 
was aired in the U. S. and Canada over 
300 to 400 stations on a budget ex- 
ceeding $1,000,000. Currently, it is 
scheduled over the Ke\stone Network, 
plus 12 major markets for a combined 
total of approximately 150 stations. 
There is no guarantee, however, that 
this schedule will >till be in effect as 
\ou read this. Both IF and BBD&O 
demand flexibility, and markets are 

SPONSOR 




a new 
eyeline (or 
the San Antonio skyline 




KEYL 

Cf M.NN EL 5 



KEYL 



THE NATION'S NEWEST TV STATION 
— FIRST ON THE AIR IN FIFTY! 



top television entertainment 

(or Texans in the 
San Antonio trade territory 

(fytiMHel 5 

AFFILIATED WITH DUMONT, 
PARAMOUNT FILM NETWORK 

Represented Nationally by 

Adam Youns Television, Inc. 

San Antonio Television Company 

Business Office, Studio and Transmitter 
atop the Transit Tower, San Antonio, Texas 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



41 



BIG 3 



Top-Selling Disc Jockeys 
in the Detroit Market! 



THE TOBY DAVID 
MORNING SHOW 




EDDIE CHASES 

MAKE BELIEVE 

BALLROOM 



HAL O'HALLORAN'S 
DAWN PATROL 



• Based on actual 
results for their spon- 
sors, these men are 
hitting new highs in 
popularity. From ear- 
ly morning to late at night, selling products or service 
via CKLW is an easy, thrifty proposition! 

50, COO WATTS, MIDDLE OF THE DIAL AT 800 KC. 

CKLW 

Guardian Building • Detroit 26 

MUTUAL Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 

SYSTEM National Rep. 



42 



constantly changing. 

Chiquita's effect has been wide- 
spread: she's even influenced the com- 
ics. When Frank King, creator of 
Gasoline Alley, showed a baby sitter 
raiding the refrigerator — which con- 
tained bananas — he was deluged with 
indignant letters. "You don't do that 
to bananas," howled his readers. A 
chagrined King hadn't time to pull the 
lnu \ pas out of the dailies, but the Sun- 
da\ strip had no bananas in the re- 
frigerator. 

By this time, Chiquita had rung up 
another first in an increasingly long 
list. Recorded by at least nine differ- 
ent companies, the tune was being 
played on juke boxes all over the na- 
tion. By popular demand, LF pub- 
lished the song in sheet music form in 
the American Weekly. 

Now came the problem of showing 
what Chiquita looked like. "As part of 
our long-range program," says Par- 
tridge, "we wanted eventually to go in- 
to television, too. But it was a costh 
proposition, and we had a valuable 
property. What if the transition from 
vocal to vocal-visual was a let-down to 
viewers who might have their own 
mental picture of Chiquita? We de- 
cided an actual person wouldn't do; it 
would have to be a drawing." 

Over 155 designs were considered. 
Most were gay and ingratiating, but 
somehow they all looked like a Latin 
lovely you'd seen somewhere before. 
They weren't Chiquita. Then Partridge 
had a happy thought. "Look," he said, 
■'were trying to make Chiquita look 
like a person. She's a person, all right, 
but she can't look like anyone else: 
she's a banana. What's wrong with a 
banana in human form?" 

Obviously, nothing. With the final 
cartoon approved. I F plunged, not in- 
to TV, but into the toughest market of 
all . . . commercial films. 

"We knew film houses generalb 
don't go for commercial movies, and 
it's understandable. After all. a cus- 
tomer pays his money to be enter- 
tained. But we thought we could make 
it light and amusing enough so that the 
educational part would be fun, too." 

The education was designed to teach 
the audience new uses for bananas. As 
a vegetable, for instance, in broiled, 
fried, or baked form. Forty percent of 
the 80-second film is devoted to recipes, 

John Sutherland was contracted to 
produce the so-called "minute" mov- 
ies; Monica Lewis (Chiquita number 
three i was to be the voice. Altogether. 
a -cries of 23 experimental films were 

SPONSOR 




Best eye and ear specialist in town! 



That's what both local and national time buyers say about 
WCAU's radio and television stations. 

| WCAU-AM has been first in every Philadelphia audience-measurement 
survey ever made. That kind of history speaks for itself. 

2 WCAU-TV outpaces the other Philadelphia stations in local program 
popularity.* 

WCAU — CBS radio and TV network affiliate — brings you 
the top stars ... a growing parade from Benny to Bergen 
and from Waring to Wynn. 

Wherever you are, if you want to sell Philadelphia, 
you want WCAU-AM and WCAU-TV. 

'Telepulie 



WCAU 



CBS AFFILIATE 



TV 
FM 



^y 



The Philadelphia Bulletin Stations 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



43 



produced. Ml followed the same pal- 
tern. The opening, an amusing situa- 
tion. Then enter Chiquita who saves 
the <la\ with .1 suggestion. After a 
■fill exit, two or three voices break 
in with the recipe. In some scenes 

dishes are shown being prepared with 
real ingredients h\ human hands be- 
cause food loses its appeal when shown 
in cartoon-. 

The good taste of the films helped 
them crack 375 (out ol 850) theatres 
which had never before shown a com- 
mercial film. 

Chiquita was read) for 1\ at long 



last. Or so I F and BBD&O thought. 
\ screening of the Technicoloi 

shorts over a closed video circuit dis- 
closed that the recipe scenes did not 
televise clearly. It was difficult to dis- 
tinguish, for example, the various items 
used in a salad plate. On the screen, 
the salad appeal- rich and appetizing 
in color: on I \ it transmitted as a 
dark mass with little or no definition 
between ingredients. 

To improve matters, the agenc) de- 
cided to make a black and white print 
from just one of the three color nega- 
tives used in printing the movies. The 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (J> 



The Station that Delivers the 

Plus Audience! 



FIRST: 



IN LISTENING (Hooper) 

IN NETWORK (NBC) 

IN POWER (5000 WATTS) 

ON THE DIAL (600) 
ON THE AIR (1930) 



Your FIRST and BEST Buy! 



Affiliated with 
NBC 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (^ 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY YEAR 



Represented by 
Headley-Reed Co. 



green negative was chosen because it 
was the predominant color in the ma- 
jorit\ of the playlets. Results are ex- 
cellent. The live food sequences, in 
particular, are bright and clear. 

In the middle of November. Chiquita 
Banana started a 13-week test cam- 
paign on all New York and two Bos- 
ton TV stations (these cities being 
home offices of I F, and among their 
largest selling ana-'. Because of its 
unorthodox 80-second length, the spots 
are placed primarih in participation 
periods, mostly around the dinner 
hour, and in several instances in one- 
minute period- where the preceding 
program can he cut to accommodate it. 

In the middle of January, additional 
TV spots were added when I F bought 
twice dailx participation for Chiquita 
in the 15-minute human interest pro- 
gram "Stranger than Fiction' via 
W \ \C-T\. Boston. 

I nited Fruit has never offered a 
premium itself. But the Kellogg Com- 
pany, in conjunction with L F. used 
six color transfer pictures of Chiquita 
,ind a rag doll version of the young 
lady, as a premium to help sell its corn- 
flakes. 

There's no guarantee that I F wont 
handle a premium itself in the future. 

"Chiquita s an unpredictable person- 
alis ." sa\s Mr. Partridge, whose offices 
are overflowing with premium idea-. 

"We operate."' hi- concluded, "on 
the idea that if we can create sales and 
good will for ourselves and allied con- 
cerns, were doing the job we set out 
to do. Flexibility and mohilitx in our 
own advertising, and the feeling we are 
contributing something to the overall 
advertising picture which will educate 
the consumer to a healthier, happier 
life, just about covers it. 

"What Chiquita has done for sales 
is. of course, impossible to saj because 

of the great demand. \s lor what she 
has accomplished in the wax of good 
will, the record speaks for itsell. 

"We are firmlj convinced that ever) 
medium serves a purpose; that one 

doe- not detract from, hut lathei 
strengthen-, the power ol the others. 
There is no >cl allocation of our budget 
to an\ one of them. That i- win our 
radio-TV figures for 1930 arc- arbitra- 
ry and preliminary, subject to change 
al an\ time. We're like an organist 
who pulls out the -lop- that will make 
the tune sound best. 

Right now. after fixe xear- of Chi- 
quita, the tune still sounds might) 
I * • • 



44 



SPONSOR 






COST 



stok* 



WCFL, Chicago 
1000 on the dial 



Represented by the Boiling Company 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 45 




He's gone too far already, say 
some. There's the station manager in 
North Carolina who wrote that 
he got so steamed up looking at the represen- 
tation of the "Station Manager" 
that the print burst into flame. And the 
New York radio director who 
locked his copy of the "Account Execu- 
tive" in his desk because one of the 
agency account big-wigs "was kind 
of sensitive." So it's wise to calculate the 
risk before decorating your office with 
these five provocative, radio-ribbing, 
Jaro Hess drawings. They're 
12" x 15", reproduced on top-quality 
enamel stock, ideal for framing. 



Sponsor there's the itetion 

Radio Director. 

e with your 

e to SPONSOR, 510 



r 



~1 



L 



($8.00 per year) 



If you think the sponsor is out-of-this- 
world, then wait 'til you see the four 
others. Jaro Hess caricatures are 
available only with your subscrip- 
tion to SPONSOR. Extra sets, avail- 
able to subscribers, at $4.00 each. 



"I am 100% satisfied with 
your excellent caricature titled 
Sponsor never satisfied." 

The Toni Company 
Don P. Nathanson 



"It's a good thing advertising 
men don't bruise easily because 
these Jaro Hess satires really rib 
the business." 

Louis C. Pedlar, Jr. 
Cahn-Miller, Inc. 



"The pictures by Jaro Hess 
are splendid and I'm delighted 
to have them." 

Niles Trammell 
NBC 



"During each busy day I make 
it a point to look at them just 
once. They always bring a smile 
and relieve tension." 

Dick Gilbert 
KRUX 



SPOT, NETWORK, OR BOTH? 

{Continued from page l')i 

prerequisites I plus an unshakable be- 
lief that network advertising was it> 
proper medium I when it signed the 
modest-cost Fihher McGee \ Moll\ l<> 
a 26-station NBC Blue Network in 
L935. And it needed plenty of that 
unshakable belief, too. After 15 
months, their Hooper was as modest 
as their budget: 7.0. Bv April. 1937, 
it was 12.8. In 1944. it hit 33.5 to be- 
come the highest-rated comedy team 
on the air. and in second place on 
audience preference lists. Last year 
il was in third place with a substantial 
rating of 24.9. 

What S. C. Johnson accomplished 
by staying with its network decision 
is two-fold. It sold America generally 
on wax for a variety of uses, and on 
Johnson wax particularly. Johnson's 
wax outsells all other brands put to- 
gether. 

What of spot radio advertising? 

As previously indicated, spot can be 
highly effective for a national adver- 
tiser. And for a seasonal product, or 
one with spotty distribution, or some- 
thing new or speculative, or for a lim- 
ited budget, it can't be overlooked. It 
is the best national product proving- 
ground in radio advertising. Because 
of spot's flexibility and mobility, astute 
advertising managers can manipulate 
their campaigns much in the manner 
of a general deploying his forces. If 
a product is new, and consumer ac- 
ceptance yet to be gained, it is as much 
an advertising error to pit it against 
an established product as it would be 
a tactical error to order green troops 
to battle seasoned veterans. 

The new anti-histamine products are 
a good case in point. It would be fool- 
hardy to attempt to establish these 
products, while they are still compara- 
tively new, via network advertising. 
The same goes for king-sized cigar- 
ettes. Embassy, Fatima. Cavalier. 
Life, Pall Mall and Regents are heavy 
spot users. They are gaining their ob- 
jectives step by step. As a result they 
are able to analyze the opposition's 
strength and so conclude when to move 
into a market, when to sit tight until 
enough force is mustered to strike. Is 
a specific market lagging; is his prod- 
uct moving sluggishly off dealers' 
shelves in certain areas; do distribu- 
tors need a shot in the arm in others? 
The advertiser can shift markets al- 



most as easif) as the general moves 
the pins on his map. 

\o more orderl) progression to- 
wards its objective comes to mind 
than the case of Kosefield Packing's 
Skippv I'eanut Butter. No brand of 
peanut butter had been established 
nationals or in volume when Skippv 
decided it could be done, i Previous- 
ly, the product had been sold and 
named regionally by local packagers, i 

Network was out of the question. 
The budget was too small, the risk too 
great. Starting in one city with a spot 
campaign eight years ago, Rosefield 
Packing concentrated on wholesale and 
retail outlets, building up distributors. 
It was tough, pioneering work. But 
it was done so realistically and well 
that the program was extended to 52 
markets. 

For the past seven years, "Skippv 
Hollywood Theater" has been the ve- 
hicle ... a comparatively low-cost 
transcribed show from Hollywood fea- 
turing minor screen names and experi- 
enced radio talent; it was created by 
transcription producer C. P. Mac- 
Gregor in cooperation with Rosefield 
and its agency, Garfield-Guild. (Since 
1948, Young & Rubicam. San Fran- 
cisco, has handled the account. I 

As the show rolled up audiences. 
Skippy invaded market after market, 
always preceded by the program. Fol- 
lowing its uncompromising "hands off 
low-audience, poor listening-time 
buys," the product never entered a 
market until good evening time on a 
top rated station (preferably a 50.000- 
w after) was available. In every mar- 
ket it entered. Skippy not only started 
right up the sales ladder, but upped 
peanut butter consumption generally. 
With the groundwork solidly estab- 
lished via spot, Rosefield Packing put 
Skippy on 62 CBS stations in Decem- 
ber, including two in Hawaii. 

The story of Bulova Watch, second 
largest spot user (Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet is first), reads like a textbook on 
successful spot use. It started in 1927. 
when time signal spots were placed 
with WWJ, Detroit. That year the 
Biow Co. (still Bulova's agency after 
25 years) spent $30,000; in 1949 it 
spent $3,500,000 on over 250 stations 
and in every TV market with 10 and 
20-second announcements and some 
time signals. 

The format is simple and frequent: 
telling people the time, spelling out 
B-U-L-O-V-A for remembrance value; 
buying spots before and after leading 




SAN FRANCISCO- 
WELCOME 



Available February 28th, 
the first Pulse radio re- 
port for the San Fran- 
cisco metropolitan area. 

This radio report will be 
issued bimonthly here- 
after, and becomes num- 
ber nine in the list of 
Pulse radio reports. The 
others are Boston, New 
York, Northern New Jer- 
sey, Philadelphia, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Chicago, 
Cincinnati, and Los An- 
geles. 

For radio and television 

tacts 

ASK THE PULSE 



THE PULSE Incorporated 




13 FEBRUARY 1950 



47 




Produces over 

$1,000,000,000 of 

Manufactured 

Goods Annually 




NORTH CAROLINA 



Networks 

AM 

FM 


23 

2,064 

403 


TV 

Short-Wave 

Canada 


90 

4 

150 


TOTAL BMI 




LICENSEES . 


.2,734* 


You are assured of 


complete 


coverage 


when you program 
BMI-licensed music 

■■As of February 6, 1950 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



network shows. The variations, regionally, in con- 

Bulova learned a lesson after the sumer product acceptance and peak 
stock market (rash of 1929. when the listening periods are too clearly set 
widespread panic influenced them to forth in the accompanying charts to 
relinquish a majority of spots. It was need reemphasis here. But consider a 
.1 heartbreaking job getting them hack, small sample of the fluctuation of lis- 
W Idle man) watch companies cut ad 
budgets during the war I when their 
factories were largely engaged in pro- 
duction for militar) use), Bulova re- 
membered "29 and hung on. Spot is 
Bulova*s onl) radio advertising, and 
sales are directly traced market-by- 
market through the simple device of 
altering the watch nam.-. 

Stimulating, too. is the experience 
'd \jax Cleanser, which started out 
three years ago to crack one of the 
most competitive of all markets. Spot 
radio and newspapers were chosen ex- 
clusive!) to earn the product across 
country. The agenc) (Sherman & 
Marquette) will not reveal its method 
of buying spot radio, but concedes it 



teners* tastes between markets, based 
on C. L. Hooper - winter-spring reports 
for 1949: 

Vrthur Godfrey — Peoria. 2'^.M; Fori 
Worth. 3.5 

Pepper Young's Family — Fort Worth, 
13.9; S\ racuse, 5.5 

Wendy Warren — S\ racuse. 11.2: Ok- 
lahoma City . 1.4 

^oung Dr. Malone — Cleveland. 10.8; 
Fort Wayne. 2.4 

Portia Faces Life — Oklahoma Cit\ . 
12.3; Cleveland. 3.7 

Ladies Be Seated — Fort Wayne. 11.3; 
Fargo, 3.5 

Ma Perkins— Fargo. 20.2: Peoria, 1.0. 

Does it seem wise judgment to buy 



BMI 

SIMPLE ARITHMETIC 
IN 

MUSIC LICENSING 



has done "a terrific job" in jockeying a sin ? le l >P e P ro £ ram to appeal to 
sales to top position in main markets. 
\jax. currentlj number two seller in 
the field, is scuffing the heels of long- 
time leader Bab-O. 

This leaves two points in sponsor's 
roundup of spot's positive factors: 



these very individualistic markets, and 
the people who make up those mar- 
kets — especially when local programs, 
with their intense!) loyal audiences. 
are available for the job? It s an old 
advertising axiom that when \ ou set 



products which have a high regional out t() clinch a sale - s P eak t,ie ° ,npr fel " 

lows language. There are relatively- 
few universal languages which network 



variation m consumer acceptance; 
products which need to reach a specific 
segment of the audience a' peak listen- 
ing time. 

These are hot!) disputed points. 
with spokesmen for network and spot 
claiming superiority in tailoring cam- 
paigns to fit those product and con- 
sumer characteristics. The arguments 
advanced must be reviewed searching- 
ly, for not all considerations are im- 
mediately apparent. 

Without exception, network execu- 



can use to do this; spot does it by ap- 
pealing knowingly to listeners" likes 
and dislikes. 

Comparative-cost pros and cons, of 
course, are a moot subject. So com- 
plex is this question that an entire 
article could be devoted to it without 
nearing a clear-cut decision. The net- 
works offer package programs which, 
on a nationwide basis, are generally 
le>- expensive than individual pro- 



tives sa\ that b\ buying a network of grams on a number of stations. Yet. 

Capitol. Lang-Worth. World, RCA 

Thesaurus. Standard Radio and other 

ibraries offer scripts for spot 



selected markets a manufacturer can 
achieve results comparable to the use 
of spot stations. The perplexity in 
this argument revolves around three 
points: I 1 I the regional variation in 
consumer purchases. (2 1 the regional 
variation in listening habits I see 



music 

broadcasting to fit varied budgets. 
And Ziv, TSI, Goodman, MacGregor, 
Fells, and other transcribed-program 

firms can furnish standardized pro- 



charts on page 10 i and the fluctuation grams often the equal of network fare, 
in listeners' program tastes between ' l ' ,(, '' s down to what the advertiser 

markets. wants, and what he has to spend. 

\n advertiser buying selected net- SPONSOR has no brief in favor of 
work stations or a regional network buying network or spot or vice ver>a. 
buys a single type of program to ap- It definitel) holds the belief, however, 
peal to a highly diversified audience: thai 1050 can be a red letter year for 
one with such cleancut differences in 
product acceptance, listening habits. 
b) time of da) and night, and program 
preference. a> to be startling. 



manufacturers who will study their 
broadcast advertising problems and 
goals objectively . . . and stick to their 
conclusions. 



* • • 



48 



SPONSOR 



For all the favorite NBC network 
television programs ... and really 
good local productions . . . everybody's 
watching CS^QKWW. .. exciting new 
"Clear Sweep" television station 
that . . . 

MAKES THE SAN FRANCISCO 



BAY AREA A "HOT 



it 



TELEVISION MARKET 




• Represented nationally by FREE & PETERS, INC New York, Chicago, 

Detroit, Atlanta, Fort Worth, Hollywood. KRON-TV offices and studios in the 
San Francisco Chronicle Building, 5th and Mission Streets, San Francisco 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



49 



THE AUTO INDUSTRY 

[Continued from page 25 I 

same waj as other industries arc flirt- 
ing with television toda\. The cai 
makers, in effect, are about 10 years 
behind the pack. 

I he) started out 1 oldl\ enough, a 
glance at the record shows. Hack in 
January, 1027. Henrj lord sponsored 
the hour-long "Old fashioned Dam" 
Program" on NBC, spending $10,000 
for two allots. General Motors, fol- 
lowing Ford's lead, in March bought 
the first of its once-monthl) "Cadillac 
Concerts'* on the late NBC Blue Net- 
work. In July. CM aired a one-shot 
for Buick on NBC "Boxy and His 
Gang." By September, cautious Chrys- 
ler was in the thick of it with "The De- 
pendable Hour of Music" on CBS. 

In November, General Motors re- 
turned to the air with the "General 
Motors Family Party," which ran 
through 1020. During the next five 
years, almost every major automaker 
— including some firms since defunct, 
like Graham-Paige. Franklin, and 
Durant — took a flyer in radio. I n- 
fortunatelv. most of them made their 



bid on a much too tentative and Meet- 
ing basis. 

B\ the mid-thirties, some ol the 
automotive leaders were emboldened 
to the point ol staving with a show for 
more than one or two programs. Ford 
inaugurated the "Fred Waring Show" 
and the "Ford Sundav Fvening Hour." 
Chrysler, breaking awa\ for the first 
lime from the straight musical formal, 
made radio histors with the "Major 
Bowes Amateur Hour." which set an 
all-time record as the highest-rating 
commercial network -how. 

The increasing importance of the 
local dealer in automotive merchan- 
dising began to make itself felt by 
103."). In that year, Chevrolet bought 
a transcribed World Broadcasting Sys- 
tem show. "Musical Moments." on 300 
stations. This was the largest selective 
radio campaign of its day, and firmly 
established in automotive air advertis- 
ing the theme of "see your local deal- 
er." 

After the I . S. entered the war. the 
auto makers, like other industrialists, 
switched to the production of guns, 
aircraft, tanks, munitions, and other 
materiel. Automobile advertising 




FIRST in 

the QUAD CITIES 



In Davenport, Rock Island, Moline and East Moline 
is the richest concentration of diversified industry be- 
tween Chicago, Minneapolis, St. Louis and Omaha. The Quad 
Cities ate the trading center for a prosperous two-state agricultural 
area. Retail sales, total buying and per capita income rate higher 
than the national average, according to Sales Management. 



WOC-AM^X'WOC-FM, 



47 Kw. 
03.7 Mc. 



WOC delivers this rich market to NBC Network, national spot 
and local advertisers . . . with 70 to 100% BMB penetration in the 
two-county Quad City area ... 10 to 100"') in adjacent counties. 



W0C-TV 



Channel 5 
22.9 Kw. Video 



12.5 Kw. Audio 



V. 



On the Quad Cities' first TV station NBC Network (non-inter- 
connected), local and film programs reach over 5,000 Quad Cities' 
sets . . . hundreds more in a 75 air-mile radius. 

Basic NBC Affiliate 
Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
Ernest Sanders, General Manager 



DAVENPORT, IOWA 

FREE & PETERS, Inc. 

Exclusive National Representatives 




either was suspended cnlireh or re- 
verted to the purest type of institution- 
al selling, calculated to keep the manu- 
facturer s name before the public. 
\\ hen the war ended and reconversion 
began, the pent-up demand for new 
cars continued to be so strong that the 
gist of most automotive advertising 
had to be, "Keep \our shirts on." 

Customers' shirts, it would appear, 
are on to sta\ . 1 bus. automobile ad- 
vertising has had to be reconverted 
to meet the new market situation just 
as the auto plants were reconverted at 
the wars end. But the automobile in- 
dustry, dragging its feet as usual in 
radio, has been uncommonly slow in 
its reaction. 

The Ford Motor Co. (agency: J. 
Walter Thompson I awoke with a start 
last January, shot a worried glance at 
the calendar, and bought $500,000 
worth ol \M and TV shows in advance 
of the new-car showings. Although 
this was the first time that Ford had 
bought network programs on a short- 
term basis, it doesn't necessarily fol- 
low that it presages a revolution in 
automotive advertising on the air. 
While the short-term buy may indeed 
color Ford's subsequent use of net- 
work radio, there is no reason to sup- 
pose that the rest ol the indusl i \ H ill 
follow suit. 

Gordon C. Fldredge, advertising 
manager of the Ford Division, said of 
the short-term bin : ". . . It presents a 
greater flexibilitj for the advertiser. 
It's roughly equivalent to buying pages 
in publications foi specified dates of 
issue, and hence it permits closer tim- 
ing with an overall advertising cam- 
paign." 

Ford has been as will\-nill\ about 
radio in the past as am other car 
maker, but in this instance at least, the 
compain acted promptly and on a 
broad enough scale to accomplish its 
objective. 

Chevrolet (agency: Campbell- 
Fwaldl. on the other hand, has made 
a major effort in television, ('.bevvy's 
video schedule includes the "Tele- 
Theater" on NBC; "Inside 1 S \" on 
CBS-TY: local sponsorship of the 
"Pantomime Qui/" In the Chevrolet 
Dealers Assn. of New ^ ork. New Jer- 
sc\ . and Connecticut: the Boiler Derln 
on W.I/-TN : "famous Jury Trials' on 
\\ \BD: "Winner Take All." on CBS- 
l\ ; Golden Cloves .... WPIX, and T\ 
announcements in 25 markets. 

The Chrysler Corp. (agencies: Ruth- 
raulT \ Kvan: BBDMC \. W. \veri. 



50 



SPONSOR 



extends 




On the occasion of its 
- ntv . fifth Ann.v.-rsnry 
^"staUon^TlC 

arm greetings to 
,, .,\sts agencies 
* e "^ „tMb -bom 

•* d adVerU .riated 

Lt has been associated 

over the years 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



51 



The 




four 




pages 



Late in 1946 sponsor hopefully published the 
first issue of a unique magazine devoted 100% 
to helping advertisers and advertising agencies 
appreciate, evaluate, and effectively use radio 
and television advertising. 

Every year since its inception sponsor has 
issued a report to its readers describing its 
state of health, its growth, what it has done, 
what it intends doing. When a magazine serves 
an industry we believe that its readers are en- 
titled to such information. 

Herewith are some facts of particular interest. 

As of the issue of 30 January, 1950, sponsor 
had published 4,424 pages. Of these, 744 pages 
were printed in the first year, 1494 pages in the 
second, 2186 pages since. 

About 53% of the total linage has been de- 
voted to editorial, 47% to advertising. 

sponsor started with a staff of eight. One year 
later it had twelve. Today it has twenty. 



for buyers of radio and televi, 



1 

evi5i(k 



sponsor began its career as a monthly. When 

the need for more frequent publication became 

apparent it shifted to bi-weekly operation 

(every-other-Monday) , a schedule that it has 

maintained since the beginning of 1949. 

Simultaneous with going bi-weekly, sponsor 
was granted second-class mailing privileges. In 
slightly over two years sponsor has succeeded 
in converting considerably more than 50% of 
its guaranteed 8,000 copies to paid circulation 
— at the highest subscription rate in its field. 

Today sponsor has more paid subscriptions 
among national advertisers and agency execu- 
tives than any other trade publication devoted 
to radio and television. It has more than twice 
the total advertiser and agency circulation of its 
nearest competitor. 

During the problem-rift year 1949 sponsor's 
opportunity to serve the broadcast advertising 
industry hit its full stride. Before the Broad- 



cast Advertising Bureau became a reality spon- 
sor editorialized time and again on the urgency 
of an industry promotion-and-selling bureau. 
The Big Plus, Radio Is Getting Bigger, Let's 
Sell Optimism (adopted by hundreds of sta- 
tions and reprinted by the thousands) were 
created and published during 1949. sponsor 
aimed its "pictorialized facts-and-figures tech- 
nique" on timely subjects. In addition to its 
regular issues it produced, during the year, the 
Summer Selling Issue, Fall Facts Issue, NAB 
Evaluation Issue, 99 TV Results (three print- 
ings) , Farm Facts Handbook. 

These are some sponsor contributions, over 
and beyond its normal activity, to its readers. 

We believe that sponsor's growth is in pro- 
portion to its fulfillment of outstanding indus- 
try service. 

In this crucial year 1950 we believe that 
sponsor is on the road to greater achievement. 




510 I v ladison Avenue, I lew Lyorh 22 



Clients keep 
renewing because 
. . . they're getting 

SALES 

RESULTS 

Ask vour lleaille^ - 
Keetl iii.-tn about the 
best buy in . . . 

Charlotte, >.r. 



1st in the South — sixth in th° na- 
tion in effective buying 
income per family. 



wsoc 



NBC iii t harlotte 





rfudtence 



Nov.- Dec. 1949 
MORNING 43.7 

AFTERNOON 34.9 



EVENING 



28.8 



First By Far 



WML 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Represented by 
FREE & PETERS, INC. 



has 1 ecu sponsoring the "Groucho 
Marx Show" for DeSoto-Ph mouth on 
CBS. although at this writing the pro- 
gram had been cancelled temporaril) 
because of a strike at the DeSoto- 
Plymouth plants. 

Packard (agency: Young \ Rubi- 
cam) recently signed for sponsorship 
of a new half-hour varietj sei ies over 
VB< - 1 \ . starring Edward Everett Hor- 
ton, t<> begin March 23. This show 
will mark Packard- debut in network 
telev ision. 

Buick (agenc) : Kudner). out of net- 
work television since its sponsorship 
ol the Olsen & Johnson show last sum- 
mer, has bought an extensive national 
schedule of radio and television an- 
nouncements. 

Dodge I agencs : Ruthraurf & R\anl 
has been using television on a local 
level. In Detroit, for example. Dodge 
dealers since Jan. 15 have been spon- 
soring a 15-minute sports newsreel 
program on Sunday night. 

Kaiser-Frazer (agency: Morris F. 
S\vane\ I will introduce its new low- 
priced line early in April, heralded by 
one of the biggest advertising drives 
in the histor) of the industry. Heav \ 
use of radio and television is antici- 
pated, with the accent probably on an- 
nouncements. Packard likewise has 
launched an extensive announcement 
campaign, which got under way Feb. 
1. Studebaker has been using an- 
nouncements over a wide area on a 
continuous basis. To return to the 
broader, industry-wide picture: local 
dealers can teach the average car man- 
ufacturer a great deal about the ef- 
fective use of radio. While the manu- 
facturer is onl\ now narrowing his 
sights to the direct selling range, the 
dealer has always had a sharp bead on 
the ultimate target. He knows the 
market at first hand because he lives 
in it. And his knowledge of what the 
competition is doing is necessarib 
more realistic than that of the boys in 
the board room. 

Thus the manufacturer, when plan- 
ning his radio strateg) with his agency 
advisors, would be wise to give his 
dealers a bigger voice in top-level ad- 
vertising polic) than they are getting 
today. They, after all, will be making 
most of the final sales. 

What line will automotive ;i< 1\ <i t i- 
ing on the air take in "."><>'.'' SPONSOR'S 
probing of that question indicates that 
institutional advertising will not be 
out. as one might think at first con- 
sideration, but it w ill cert iinh be sec- 



ondary. No matter what the product, 
whenever one is merchandising an 
item in the four-figure price range, a 
feeling of confidence in the maker must 
be planted and nurtured. 

I he state of the automobile market 
being what it is. however, the first 
requisite of all its advertising will be 
hard and direct selling. Claims and 
counterclaims will shower down like 
confetti, and superlatives will float 
through the air with the greatest of 
ease. Thus, much will be heard about 
the "higher (inside), wider, longer 
Dodge. with its "knee-level" seats, 
and "picture windows"; Lincoln-Mer- 
cury will bear down hard on "ease in 
steering"; and "increased driving 
smoothness"; the new DeSoto is "long- 
er, lower ( outside ) and wider" : Pack- 
ard is calling attention to specific fea- 
tures, such as its "I Itramatic" trans- 
mission. 

As this winter wears into spring and 
the heavy saturation selling linked 
with the arrival of the new models 
lessen-, it- likely that the trend toward 
the use of programs rather than an- 



WANNA 
WHITTLE 

AWAY AT 
BARLOW 

(Ky.y? 

don't use WAV*» or stron g 

-*'* jW-STSi Missi-PP. 

enougn i» ■ 

bottomland. 

But l.ke »' l VvM. can-^ 
edged «*«*_3b throng 1 th 
does— cut a f^f Trading ^ ne ; 
Louisville Retad ir ^ „ , 

important *1 < are 40% 

Families l£«ng . \ ks m ,he rest 

• n.r oft than i (1K i y, ve 
better o» Vnd boy , now 

of the stay • t 

mOW em down- uUe 

So h Sand°?f cutlery the best? 

our bran" 




54 



SPONSOR 



nouncements will l>c more evident. 
There is no set formula for choosing 
the kind ol radio program that will 
sell cars. Ford, lor example, in its big 
buy on Mutual end CBS. chose m\ster\ 
dramas, audicme participation shows. 
newsreels. dance music interludes, and 
comedy. Ford bought more mystery 
shows than an\ oilier type, as it hap- 
pens, but onl\ because there were more 
imstery shows available. 

Ford's time choices are more sig- 
nificant— all of tli e -hows were spotted 
between 7 and 1 1 p.m.. peak hours for 
family listening. The company's mo- 
tive in picking up the tab for these 
network substainers was not philan- 
thropic. Ford was aware that, year 
in and year out. many sustainers are 
among the best shows in radio, with 
huge and loyal audiences. A sponsor 
who is shrewd enough to buy an estab- 
lished sustaining program is getting, 
in effect, a going concern, with a 
readv-made clientele. The spadework 
involved in building an audience has 
been done before he arrives on the 
scene, and thus he gets real circulation 
for his first dollar. 

As for television, if the automotive 
industry's radio history were the only 
yardstick, one could expect the car 
makers to get rolling in video by about 
1960. But even Rip van Winkle, once 
roused, stayed awake. I he automo- 
bile manufacturers have been quick to 
recognize the value of television as a 
sales medium for a product which sells 
largely on visual appeal. By a twist 
of the dial, the living room can be 
transformed virtually into a dealer s 
showroom. 

While the car makers are steadily 
increasing their TV spending, there is 
no evidence that this means a cutback 
in radio. It does mean a more care- 
ful integration of media than hereto- 
fore. It means thoughtful planning, a 
lack of which quality has character- 
ized automotive broadcasting in the 
past. There is no percentage in going 
into broadcast advertising blindfolded 
through a revolving door. * * * 



AFTER MIDNIGHT 

(Continued from page 2 ( ) i 

tion to New York - - Dover, Del.. 
Bridgeport, Conn., and Bethlehem, Pa. 
The study, which was commissioned by 
WOR, showed that 43% of those polled 
listened at home. About 36$ listened 




utilizing WGY 10 years ago 

are using WGY today 

...reason? 



Represented Nationally by NBC Spot Sales 

^"B TELEVISION 

CHANNEL 4 



Serving Eastern New York, Western New 
England, Albany, Troy and Schenectady 



w 




-111 



A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



55 



in their cars while going to or coming 
from work, 14' < listened while at 
work, and the remaining 8'^ listened 
in restaurant;-. 

A later Crossley check for WOK in 
Greatei New York alone showed that 
some portion of the station's program- 
mum between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. was 
heard in 200.000 homes. WOR boost- 
ed that figure to 350,000 homes on the 
ha-i- ci| a similar survey a year later. 

Vnyone who thinks that after-mid- 
night listening is strictly a big-city 
proposition is badlv misinformed. Its 
true that many of the 24-hour stations 
are located in the larger cities — New 
^ oik. Chicago, Detroit, Washington. 
Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and so on. 
(hi the other hand, some of the most 
loyal all-night radio fans are farmers, 
living in solidly rural areas far from 
the "asphalt jungles." 

\ typical example is the rich south- 
ern California fruit and truck produce 
area served by the Broadcasting Corp. 
ol \merica stations — all five of which 
are on the air all night. It gets so hot 
there during the day that much of the 
farm work is done after dark, when 
the mercury drops sharply. It's a com- 
mon sight to find a farmer in the Im- 



perial \ allc\ or the Palo Verde \ alley 
running his tractor all night, with a 
radio beside him. 

The five BCA stations are neatl) sit- 
uated to blanket this area. KPRO, 
Riwrside, serves as the key station, 
feeding programs to the farm belt out- 
lets; KPOR-FM. San Bernardino; 
KROP, Brawley-El Centro; KREO, 
Indio - Palm Springs, and KUCB, 
Bylthe. BCA officials claim that on 
most nights there are just about as 
many people awake and listening to 
their radios in this section as there are 
during the day. It appears that those 
who aren't ploughing the south pasture 
to music, or listening at home, are lis- 
tening on the highways. 

The area is traversed by three of 
the main transcontinental traffic arter- 
ies — Highways 60. 70. and 80, and by 
a major north-south road, Highway 
99. Checks at traffic control points 
disclosed radios in 83' '< of the 52.000 
cars travelling these roads on an aver- 
age day. An estimated one-third of 
these cars are on the highways between 
midnight and 8 a.m. Moving targets, 
to be sure, but nonetheless potential 
customers with money to spend. 

BCA is so completelv sold on the 



Up On Stilts? No, Sir! Miami's Rapid 
Growth into One Of Dixie's Key Markets Is 







Greater Miami's population is made up 
of honest-to-goodness, root-growing, 
year 'round residents. ..plus thousands of 
tourists from everywhere, who come 
back year after year as regularly as the 
swallows to Capistrano! 

By telling your story with regularity over 
WIOD... which covers this expanding Key 
Market as completely as Florida's Sun... 
you can get and hold your share of sales! 

For detailed information and proof of 
our selling ability. ..call our Rep 

George P. Hollingbery Co. 



James M. LeCatC, General Manager 

5,000 WATTS • 610 KC • NBC 



richness of the after-midnight market 
and the profitability of the all-night op- 
eration that the firm plans a wide ex- 
pansion in that direction. By spring, 
BCA expects to be able to pipe all-night 
programming to stations throughout 
California and Arizona. 

Great reductions in time rates are 
one of the brightest aspects of the 
after-midnight picture, from the ad- 
vertiser's standpoint. At WNEW. for 
example, rates for time between mid- 
night and 5 a.m. are cut clearlv in 
half — S150 for a single half-hour that 
would cost $300 at 10 p.m. and the 
same deal on spots. Other all-nighters 
slash their rates similarly after mid- 
night. 

WW DC. the only round-the-clock 
station in Washington. 1). C, charges 
only $20 for six one-minute spots, or 
$70 for 29 one-minute spots. This sta- 
tion, which began all-night operations 
in January, 1944, has been outstand- 
ingly successful as an after-midnight 
sales medium — and in a citv not par- 
ticularly noted as a stay-update center. 

One of WWDC's first after-midnight 
sponsors was the small bcanerv men- 
tioned earlier. Within a year the busi- 
ness had expanded sufficicnth to main 
tain a fleet of jeeps equipped with hot 
plates, which delivered orders phoned 
in by hungry listeners egged on by the 
WWDC plugs. Other sponsors on 
WWDC's all-night "Yawn Patrol'" dur- 
ing the past year have been night 
clubs, theaters auto dealers, breweries, 
record shops, taxi companies, and sur- 
plus sales stores. Having the all-night 
field to itself in the capital, the "Yawn 
Patrol" has an exclusive estimated au- 
dience of 10.000 on weekday nights 
and up to 20.000 on Saturday night. 
I Estimates by the American Research 
Bureau, Washington.) These figures 
do not include taxicab (9.000 Wash- 
ington cabs have radios) or automo- 
bile listening. 

The bargain rates available on after- 
midnight shows are even more enticing 
when one considers the truly amazing 
"bonus" coverage that usually goes 
with them. As the night wears on and 
more and more limited-time stations 
across the country sign off. those that 
remain on become veritable one-station 
mi woi ks. beaming tin ough the unclut- 
tered ether to points hundreds or even 
thousands of miles beyond their nor- 
mal signal areas. This is true even of 
the smaller outlets— 250-watt WWDC 
has received listener mail and tele- 
grams from 43 states during the early 
morning hours. 



56 



SPONSOR 




« IllOi I i A BAMM 

United Fruit Company's First Lady of television film 
commercials and minute movies. 

1 recent independent audience reaction study proved 
that Chiquita Banana trrt.v the most popular of ten TV 
film commercial spots testetl: 



CHIOUITA HIGHEST RATED AVERAGE OF ALL 
ram am a COMMERCIAL TV COMMERCIALS 
BANANA TE STED TO DATE TESTED TO DATE 



INTEREST SCORE 95 

BELIEVABILITY 92 

INFORMATIVENESS 91 

REMEMBRANCE 85 

EFFECTIVENESS 

QUOTIENT 90 



85 


70 


78 


69 


81 


68 


81 


63 



79 



68 



' i United Fruit Co. 

Stories created by Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc. 

Directed and Produced 
by 

JOHN SUTHERLAND PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



NEW YORK 



HOLLYWOOD 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



57 



how big can a 
5,000 watter be? 



Plenty big. . .if the station has one 
of the half-dozen best frequencies in 
U. S. radio. 



that's WMT — 600 k.c, 



Plenty big. . .when ground conductivity 
and freq. combine to push the 
2.5 mv. line way out 



that's WMT — with a 2.5 mv. 
contour of 19,100 sq. mi. 



Plenty big. . .when there are people 
living in all those square miles 



that's WMTland — a "city" the size 
of Washington, D. C. , spread out 
over the richest land in the world 



WMT adds up to the kind of a station 
an advertiser needs to cover 
Eastern Iowa economically! 



*.v~v 



Now in 
our 27th 

year ■■' 



WMT 



• 

Th. KuU m< 
will providl 
jull details 

• 



BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK CEDAR RAPIDS 



ask 

John Bum & ft. 

about the 

II n ens & II nun 

STATIONS 
IN 

ItlMIUOMI 

WMIIG-am 

WOOD-™ 
w TV It- tv 



First Stations of Virginia 



#7i#* Case ©# thv 

skeptical 
iuyi:k 



His product was home insulation 
— big stuff. 

When a KDYL salesman said, 
"Let's pitch that to our big 
morning audience," the man was 
skeptical . . . but said he'd try 
it. 

He sold three insulation jobs 
within a week as a direct result 
of a few morning spots. 

That's when he called the KDYL 
salesman and said, "Run, don't 
walk, down to my place so I can 
sign a long contract!" 

Another satisfied KDYL client. 
And of course KDYL-TV brings 
the same kind of results! 



'*&£&■ 



Salt Lake City. Utah 
National Repreientative John Blair & Co. 



Powerful WJR. Detroit, operating 
with .")() kilowatts on a clear channel, 
has pulled replies from virtually every 
state in response to its "Goodwill 
Dawnbuster" program, aired from 2 
a.m. to 5 a.m. — and also from Iceland, 
Cuba. Puerto Rico, Australia, New 
Zealand, and Alaska. Save-By-Mail, 
Inc., bought six announcements on 
WJR at 2 a.m. between Dec. 6 and Dec. 
1 1. announcing a special Christmas of- 
fer of giant animal toy balloons. The 
spots pulled 831 orders from many 
states, at a cost to the advertiser of 
12.6^ per order. The company had al- 
io, ated 2.~>C pel ordei and would have 

thought it a good bu\ even at that 
price. 

Still more spectacular was a mail 
test made over WJR last winter by the 
Chrysler Corp., whirl) sponsored "One 
Hour of Entertainment" from 1 to 2 
a.m. Monda\ through Saturday. An 
offer of a free automatic pencil drew a 
total of 17.129 requests from 42 states 
and six Canadian provinces, all post- 
marked within 24 hours of the an- 
nouncement as stipulated. 

The unique quality of after-midnight 
programming undoubtedly has had 
much to do with its outstanding suc- 
cess as a sales medium. This is re- 
laxed, shirt-sleeves radio, in sharp con- 
trast to the frenetic, always-punching 
daytime variety. The pressure is off. 
and all the listener need do is listen, 
with a minimum of mental effort. 

It's axiomatic in after -midnight 
radio that "the more music and the 
less talk, the better the show." Obvi- 
ously, the kind of music played is im- 
iioilanl. too. The smarter all-night disc 
jockeys eschew the blaring "One 
O'clock Jump school for less bucket- 
footed fare - Strauss waltzes, light 
classics, and the like. Sometimes there 
is a noisy minoritj of listeners who 
seem to prefer loud and hot licks even 
at 3 a.m., but firm handling usually 
sways them. 

Man-Cummings. all nijdit disc jockey 
loi WW IK'. Washington, took a dras- 
tic step along this line some weeks ago. 
He played eight different renditions of 
"Mule Train." flooding the capital with 
whip -cracking and clippety-clopping 
For a solid half-hour. This was a re 
verse-English approach. "I wanted to 
pla\ the tunc to death in the shortest 
possible period." Cummings said. 

Newscasts are standard on most af- 
ter-midnight shows. usualK in shots of 
five minutes or less, together with 
weather reports. Late -port- results are 
a fixture on man) such programs. 



58 



SPONSOR 



Others feature one or more interviews 
each night with recording artists or 
other show business luminaries. I here 
is often a tendency to overdo such |>m- 
gramming, however. This should be 
guarded against lesi the show become 
too talky. 

Mood is practically everything in 
the after-midnight field, and the big 
thing is to avoid jarring it. The re- 
laxed listener is an ideal sales prospect. 
The more adroit after-midnight an- 
nouncers and disc jockeys are artists 
at inducing just the right degree of 
semi-somnolence — a state difficult to 
achieve during standard broadcasting 
hours, when there are any number of 
distractions. 

But the trick of turning the all-night 
audience into gold isn't really alchemy. 
It's a formula that any thoughtful ad- 
vertiser can master, as thousands al- 
readv have. * * * 



D-DAY AT THE WALDORF 

(Continued from page 30 I 

fessionals such as Bing Crosby. Boh 
Hope and Fred Waring will appear. 

Following is the suggested agenda, 
which may be a model for showings in 
other parts of the 1 . S. 

The film will be shown in the Wal- 
dorf's Grand Ballroom, starting about 
6:30. Dinner will follow. After din- 
ner, such public and industry leaders 
as Henry Ford II, Harvey Firestone, 
Jr., David Lilienthal. and Harold Stas- 
sen will speak briefly. Culminating the 
evening. George Denny, moderator of 
ABC's "Town Meeting of the Air," 
will preside over an open discussion 
of radio cued by the film showing. 

The first rough-cut full-length ver- 
sion of LIGHTNING THAT TALKS Was 
viewed on 2 Feb. in New York by a 
group of network, station, and trade 
press representatives. The showing, 
hold in NBC's Johnnj Victor Theater, 
was in the nature of a sneak preview 
and the film will undergo further edit- 
ing and modification before making its 
formal bow at the Waldorf. The fin- 
ished product will be available for lo- 
cal showings in 16 mm. or 35 mm.. 
each running about 45 minutes. Two 
20-minute condensations of lightning 
THAT TALKS are also being produced, 
one emphasizing radios position in the 
American social scheme, the other 
built around four radio result stories 
touched on in the film. * * * 



YARDSTICK NUMBER TWO 

[Continued from ]><tu.e 27 i 

of critics seem to encourage its pos- 
sible misuse. 

For example, an average daily audi- 
ence statistic might be used to bolster 
weaker days and some other figure, 
as a telephone coincidental, used to sell 
stronger daj s. 

The three-categor\ breakdown offers 
an operator interesting possibilities in 
finding some instance in which he can 
claim leadership for his outlet. And 
he only has to lay his rate card down 
beside each column possibh to multi- 



pl) his i hances oi finding a case in 
which he can claim leadership. 

The 1949 report, a $1,200,000 effort, 
got under way in November, 1948 
when a sample of 652,000 names was 
selected. Ballots were mailed in the 
spring o! 1949 to families in all coun- 
ties. \ iet urn of 55', (357,000 bal- 
lot- i formed the basis foi tabulating 
one of the most comprehensive media 
impact studies on record. 

Television and FM effects since 
Spring, 1949, can not be exactly cal- 
culated, but the current study reveals, 
according to Dr. Baker, some coverage 
dents attributable to this influence. 




radio stations everywhere 




BUT ONLY ONE... 




Agency time buyer or Advertiser How 

does this sound to you 7 Radio pro- ^^^^~~ 

gramming facilities unrivaled outside New York or Hollywood production 

centers A 200 person talent staff including some of America's 

biggest name entertainers And to reach the booming Central-South 

market the most powerful signal now authorized any American radio 

station — 50 000 watts on an interference-free Clear Channel 

That's what you get when you buy WSM That's why with 2612 
stations in this country there is still ONLY ONE WSM 

SALESMAKER TO THE CENTRAL-SOUTH 



EDWARD PCTRY 4, CO. 

Notions' K*pr«*»nlol'»» 



13 FEBRUARY 1950 



59 




'Nal D. Williams, one of many 
good reasons why a substantial 
portion* of the Memphis mar- 
ket call WDIA 'my station'. 
Oct.-Nov. Hoopers place WDIA 
No. 1 in the A.M., No. 2 after 
noons. These are just a few of 
the reasons why WDIA does a 
real job for sneh accounts as 
Stokely-Van Camp, [nc. 

* Metropolitan Memphis 44% Negro, 
U.S. Census 10411. 

WDIA, Memphis, Tennessee, 
Bert Ferguson, Mngr., Harold 
Walker, Com'l Mngr., John E. 
Pearson, Rep." 



Do You Want More 

Motion in Your 

Promotion? 



Winner of many national 
promotion awards seeks 
wider field of operation. 
20-year advertising and 
promotion career has in- 
• hided positions as artist, 
layout man, copywriter, as- 
sistant advertising manager, 
advertising and sales pro- 
motion manager (industry 
and radio stations), and 
telex ision network advertis- 
ing and promotion director 
. . . and -till in earl) 40V 

Highest references including 
present affiliation. 

BOX No. 2.{. SPONSOK 



But the single most important fac- 
tor affecting the 1949 coverage picture 
is the advent of 1.200 new stations 

(pred inently locals I since the 1946 

study. In their communities they have 
picked up local audiences and popu- 
larity, much as would a new local daily 
or weekly newspaper. The bulk of 
fringe audience losses of big power 
stations were gains of these small local 
outlets. In many instances this kind 
of audience loss has been negligible. 
And other factors have contributed to 
increasing audiences generally since 
1946. 

Quite apart from power increases. 
network changes, increasing popularity 
of a network, more aggressive manage- 
ment policies, better programing and 
promotion, etc. — all of which could re- 
sult in bigger station audiences — the 
following factors have added tremen- 
dously to radio listening: 

1. Between 1946 and 1949, radio 
families increased by 5,283,000. 

2. The increase in radio families 
combined with the extra time 
spent listening by families gen- 
erally resulted in an increase of 
home-hours of listening from 
I :,(,.( HIO.IM 1(1 in 1946 to 198.000.- 
000 in 1949 (Nielsen Radio In- 
dex figures) . 

And this doesn't take into account 
the important factor of out-of-home 
listening. 

A check of 139 stations, selected at 
random, whose BMB counties are con- 
tained in a single state, reveals in- 
creased audiences for low-power, in- 
town stations. Most of these stations 
were new in 1946, and the check only 
confirmed what was naturally antici- 
pated. 

Changed listening patterns since 
1946 make the current study an even 
more indispensable aid to advertisers 
in analyzing both network and spot 
coverage for maximum audiences. 

The special tabulations obtainable 
on request will be a must for national 
advertisers concerned with selecting 
radio coverage in connection not only 
with competing stations, hut with other 
media, especially where newspaper, 
magazine, and other advertising may 
be a factor. The three subscribing net- 
works, ABC. CBS. NBC. will be pro- 
vided complete sets ol IBM cards cov- 
eting their own alliliates for use in 
helping clients plan n.'tvvork coverage. 

Dr. Baker has emphasized that the 
new data docs not reveal how many 
minutes a person listens. It does not 



tell age or sex of the listener. It does 
sum up weekly audiences on the fre- 
quency-of-listening basis of 1-2: 3- 
4-5; 7-6 times a week breakdown. 
Further studies might refine the data 
reported to a still greater degree. Pro- 
posals for morning, afternoon and 
night breakdowns among others have 
been strongly urged, in the event of a 
third BMB survey. 

The ballots for the present study, as 
a matter of fact, included space for 
questions covering time of residence in 
neighborhood, number of radios in 
working order, people in home, auto 
and telephone ownership, etc. But to 
obtain this information a subscriber 
would have to order a special tabula- 
tion, which like coverage tabulations 
would be done at cost. 

Dr. Baker emphasizes that the fac- 
tors he named i summarized in a box 
at the beginning of this article) as in- 
fluencing a station's BMB audience 
can not be used as a rule of thumb for 
predicting the nature of changes in 
BMB covearage. What competing sta- 
tions do, Dr. Baker points out, as well 
as such impacts as shifting popula- 
tions, mav exert as great an influence 
on a stations audience as a new sta- 
tion in the market. 

It is the present feeling of Dr. Baker. 
subject to modification as the result of 
further analysis, that a 3 times or of- 
tener a week listening figure mav be 
most comparable to \BC circulation 
figures. The impact of a station may 
be best estimated bv what percentage 
of its total audience is composed of 
listeners who tune it (>-7 times a week. 

This figure approximates a real 
"daily audience, though it is obvious- 
ly lower than a figure including for 
each day the correct proportion of lis- 
teners who tune 1-2 or 3-4-5 times a 
week. The BMB report explains a 
method for weighting and computing 
an average daily audience from the lis- 
teners reported in the three columns 
referred to. 

The 6-7, or "every day." listening to 
a station is probably the best indica- 
tion ol audience loyalty. BMB will 
studv its findings to ascertain what 
figure represents a fair audience loy- 
alty index. This figure will be de- 
rived from a studv of the relationship 
of the 6-7 listeners to the station's total 
weekly audience. 

In its upcoming issue 1 27 Febru- 
ary), SPONSOR will reporl specific in- 
stances and applications of BMB data 
bv agencies and advertisers. * * * 



60 



SPONSOR 



•We're accepting limited advertis- 
ing with a 10 February deadline. 
Regular insertion rates apply. Ad- 
vertising was not available in 
previous TV RESULTS booklets. 



199 

TV RESULTS 



First it was 83 

TV RESULTS, 

then we published 

99 TV RESULTS. 

So far, we've exhausted 

three printings. 

The fourth will be 

199 TV RESULTS, and will 

be fully categorized 

and indexed for 

day-to-day use. You'll 

love this one,* even 

more than you did the others. 



si»o\soit 



510 Madison Avenue, New York 22 







No, we aren't entirely conversant with 
the good Doctor Einstein's latest theory 
either, but we do know that the simplest 
arithmetic will prove the effectiveness of 
KATL's new 5000 Watt Coverage in the 
Souths richest market area. Call or write 
Jack Koste, Independent Metropolitan 
Sales, for the FACTS. 

Houston's Oldest Independent 




\ 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Mr. Advertiser: 

TELEWAYS 
TRANSCRIPTIONS 

are NOT expensive!!! 

Get the low cost for the market or 
markets where you need a top 
radio program . . . 



The following transcribed shows 
new available: — 

• TOM. DICK & HARRY 

156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• MOON DREAMS 

156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• DANGER! DR. DANFIELD 
26 30-Min. Mystery Programs 

• STRANGE ADVENTURE 
260 5-Min. Dramatic Progra-ns 

• CHUCKWAGON JAMBOREE 
lil 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 
260 15-Min. Hymn Programs 

• SONS OF THE PIONEERS 
260 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 
156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• SI RANGE WILLS 

26 30-Min. Dramatic Programs 

• FRANK PARKER SHOW 
132 15-Min. Musical Programs 



TELEWAYS 



RADIO 

PRODUCTIONS, 

INC. 



Scud for Free Audition Platter and low rates 

any of the above -hows ;o: 

8949 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 16 I iliJ 
Phono CRestvieu <>72 \H — BRadehaw 2144: 



510 Madison 



{Continued from page i i 

In be useful and reliable it is most 
important, to our \\a\ of thinking, that 
:i measurement of am medium should 
ha\e the validation of the advertiser 
and his agencj . 

SPONSOR always receives careful at- 
tention in this office. It is one of the 
few trade papers that speaks out fear- 
lessly and gives all the arguments on 
both sides of a question. 

H. N. Stovin 

V ice-President 

BBM 

Toronto 



PLEASE AIR EXPRESS COLLECT 
IMMEDIATELY TEN COPIES YOUR 
ISSUE SECOND JANUARY. YOUR 
CONTINUAL STRAIGHTFORWARD 
HONEST REPORTING OF TRANSIT 
RADIO NOTED. QUOTED. APPRE- 
CIATED. 

L. H. HlGGINS 

Manager. KTNT 
T acorn a 



I am one of those persons who is 
very negligent in writing complimen- 
tary expressions. I do want to compli- 
ment your publication on the "per in- 
quiry" and "direct mail" story. I am 
particularly pleased because you 
quoted my statements accurately. Too 
often publications like to reinterpret 
and amplify statements by individuals 
to the point where the true concept is 
garbled. You folks did an excellent 
job. 

William A. McGuineas 

Commercial Manager 

WGN 

Ch icago 

• These three letters from readers all bearing 
on trade paper accuracy ami impartiality arrived 
in a single day. 



200,000,000 HOURS 

Anent your editorial on the '200,- 

.000 Hours" how about "228 

Centuries Ever) Da\ ? 

The mathematics are obvious. 



think, and it could lend itself to a lot 
of treatments. 

Jack Boyle 

Daniel Starch & Staff 

Neiv York 



Re your poser in lead editorial 16 
January issue: If 200 M equals 200,- 
000 does 200 M M equal 200.000.000 
radio hours. 

Howard Klarm w 
WMCA 



rii 



York- 



• SPONSOR askeil editorially for suggestions on 
how to get across the faet that 200.000.000 

hours are devoted to radio listening dailv and 

how to say "200,000.000 hours" more easily. 
Here are some answers. 



THAT JARO HESS 

Early in the year 1948 your publica- 
tion sponsored a series of illustrations 
by one Jaro Hess. If memory serves 
one right, this series of illustrations 
consisted of caricatures entitled "Spon- 
sor," "Time Bu\er." "Station Man- 
ager," and "Radio Director." 

We are interested in securing at least 
one copy of each of these illustrations. 
Please advise the writer where these 
would be obtainable and the cost in- 
\ olved. 

Ralph D. Herbert 
Advertising Executive 
Ross Jurney & Associates 
Salt Lake City 



• The Jaro Hess pirtures, suitahle for framing, 
are free with a subscription to SPONSOR. Extra 
sets eost S2.50. 



AUTO REPAIR AND PARTS 

I've just finished reading the 16 
January issue of sponsor. The article 
on co-op advertising is all that anv 
time salesman could ask for. You have 
covered the subject in your usual thor- 
ough manner. 

Lately I have taken to reading 
Miilor maga/iiie which is directed to 
auto dealers and garage men. They 
run a continuing series on advertising 
and de\olc the major part of their 
efforts to direct mail and newspaper 
advertising. The\ feel that radio is not 
a good form of advertising for garages 




62 



SPONSOR 



although they have recommended it 1>\ 
implication. This repaii business is a 
big one. They expect to do better than 
$4,000,000,000 i FOl R BILLION I 

worth of business in 1 ( ).~>II. \lso some 
of the manufacturers of replacement 
parts spend large amounts for adver- 
tising, with budgets that run from 
$400,000 and up. Win can't the) be 
shown how radio would help them? 
Companies such as Gabriel, Whitaker 
etc. use magazines like the Saturday 
Evening Post, why not radio? 

Armand Terl 

WFBR 

Baltimore 



MUSIC LIBRARY COMMERCIALS 

Being enthusiastic readers of spon- 
sor we were particularly interested in 
the "Mr. Sponsor Asks . . ." column 
relative to the possibility of a national 
advertiser being able to build a profit- 
able program by using a station tran- 
scription library. The three answers in 
the affirmative confirmed our own feel- 
ing, naturally. But what delighted us 
especially was that tivo out of the three 
letters were written by Associated sub- 
scribers who have been more than suc- 
cessful in merchandising Associated's 
commercially planned "Shows That 
Sell." Mr. Winslow T. Porter of 
WINC, Winchester. Va., has 14 shows 
built out of his Associated Library. 
And while we knew that Mr. Green 
had initial success in selling "The 
Stars Sing" when it was originally- 
produced, it was an unusual pleasure 
to learn through a major publication 
such as yours that ones own show has 
been successfully renewed four times 
for additional 26 program cycles (I 
promise to read SPONSOR thoroughly 
100 times). 

I notice in your open letter to Gor- 
don Gray you are planning a souvenir 
edition for 30 Januarv devoted to 
LIGHTNING THAT TALKS. We be- 
lieve that this lightning is talking with 
a greater force than ever before, large- 
ly because of such outstanding efforts 
as the All-Radio Presentation, Mitch 
Mitchell's BAB and sponsor's new, re- 
freshing, and effective approach to 
radio. Therefore, on your souvenir 
edition, congratulations and good luck. 

Leslie F. Biebl 

Program and Promotion Manager 

Associated Program Service 

New York 

13 FEBRUARY 1950 



READING VS. LISTENING 

1 am interested in obtaining repi i til 
copies i>l "Seeing \s. Listening" bj 
Paul Lazarsfeld. The article appeared 
in sponsor several months ago. 

I have contacted Mr. Glynn here in 
Chicago, who tells me he does not 
have copies available. Would you be 
able to send me two copies ol this 
stud) ? 

Therese Maguire 
Foote, Cone & Belding 
Chicago 

• Reprint copies of Reading vs. Listening are 
still ■▼■liable in limited quantity. 



KUKLA LIKES IT ON NBC 

That was a splendid article on Mr. 
Leroy A. Van Bomel on page 16 of the 
2 January issue of SPONSOR, but the 
last paragraph made us a little sad. 
Kukla. Fran and Ollie are on NBC 
Television and were so proud and 
happy for and about them that this 
particular typo depressed us no end. 
Sydney H. Eices 
Vice-President 
NBC 
New York 



NEGRO DISK JOCKEYS 

It appears SPONSOR is the only source 
which has a compiled list of Negro 
disc jockey shows by stations. We'd 
like very much to have such a list, and 
will be glad to reimburse you for 
charges, if an\ . 

Incidentally, I would like to add my 
comment that sponsor is doing a par- 
ticularly fine job in providing valuable 
and interesting material for the trade. 
Congratulations on an outstanding 
job! 

Vernon L. Morelock 

Vice-President 

Winius-Brandon Co. 

St. Louis 



In some manner the issue containing 
Part I of your article "The Forgotten 
15,000,000" is missing from our files. 
We would like to have this complete 
article for one of our clients and would 
appreciate your sending us a set of 
tear sheets or a complete copy of SPON- 
SOR carrying this part of the article. 
William R. McHugh 
Robert Kottwitz Advertising Inc. 
\cu Oilcans 



• "The Forgotten IS. (Kit). Odd," dealing with 

the negro radio market, appeared in SPONSOR 

issues of 10 and 21 October, 1919. A few copies 

of these issues ere sti'! available. 




This is 




NEW 
YORK" 



ACVSL 

AM-FM-TV^ 



21 r it'll Central IVeir 1 or/.- 
Counties • 205,000 #/»/#/ 
Station Audienee Families 

ACUSE 

AM-FM-TV 

NBC Affiliate in Central New York 

HEADLEY REED, National Representatives 




DO YOU NEED A VICE 

PRESIDENT IN CHARGE 

OF THE FUTURE? 

Seasoned Business Foreeaster 

ran help yon plan your 

future moves. 

Experienced . . . trustworthy in- 
terpretation of current events . . . 
realistic appraisal of what's com- 
ing — are the qualities which have 
contributed - over the past 18 
years — to m\ success for and 
with : 

A $100 Million Dollar Dept. 
Store; 

A Television Network: 

The Largest Specialt) Steel 
Fabricator; 

A Leading Ravon Yarn Pro- 
ducer; 

An Outstanding Electronics 

Company 

. . . anil a has! of others 

For an interview, please 
address Box 16. SPONSOR 



63 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Motorists love to listen 

Whether a man earns $3,000 or 
$30,000 it's onlj human nature to fol- 
low the leader. 

Some categories of industry, notably 
food and drugs, were propelled toward 
radio a- a logical and dominant adver- 
tising medium many years ago. Such 
astute advertisers as General Foods. 
Lever Brothers, Procter & Gamble, 
General Mills, and Campbell Soup dis- 
covered, year after year, that it did 
nice things to their sales curve to put 
the bulk of their media dollars into 
air advertising. 

Most soli goods national advertisers 
lia\ e since caught on. 

The new car field is different. With 
few exceptions, the automobile manu- 
facturers have been as hesitant and 
dubious in their long-range broadcast 
think inn as have the railroads. 

W e attribute that to example. In the 
automotive field, nobody set it. 

Chevrolet nearly did a number of 
years ago with a transcribed series 
over 300 stations. Studebaker has 



shown air leadership and is reaping a 
reward. Oldsmobile, Ford. Chrysler, 
Kaiser-Frazer. and Chevrolet have, 
from time to time, poured substantial 
Minis into the air media. 

But no pattern of constructive think- 
ing has emerged. Nobody set it. Most 
of the efforts are short term and short- 
sighted. The patience and fortitude 
that C. S. Johnson displayed during 
the years that it took for Fibber Mc- 
Gee \ MolK to jell is now here e\ ident. 
The saddest Factor in all this is that 
broadcast advertising has proved it- 
self an ideal salesman under the con- 
ditions that the auto manufacturers 
currently face. 

I he general buying public concedes 
the engineering excellence of practical- 
ly all American models. Styling is 
uniformly good. Prices are highly 
competitive. The manufacturers un- 
derstand this and groove much of their 
advertising to specific tastes. 

To a startling degree, today's auto 
advertising resembles cigarette adver- 
tising in its emphasis on incidentals. 

Radio is a remarkably successful 
personal salesman. The manufacturers 
will learn how successful by reference 
to their dealers throughout the nation. 
Radio is a friend in the home. It's a 
part of most women's lives, most chil- 
dren's, and of many men. With the 
distinction between models so delicate- 
ly balanced it doesn't take much to 
sway a prospective Inner in the direc- 
tion of the car his radio favorite rec- 
ommends. 

Auto manulactun-rs will use radio 
and TV during 1950 — a great deal of 
it. But it would be gratifying to note 
that it s no-in-and-out activity, that 
auto manufacturers are using the pow- 
er of the air to build good will over 
the long haul. 



Ibis \ear we suspect that two or 
three leaders may set the example. 

Since the pre-war time when auto 
manufacturers last looked to advertis- 
ing for sales, radio has been growing 
. . . and piling up sales results. Radio 
is in a better position than ever before 
to help Detroit sell its cars. 

TV on its own 

A growing number of the nation's 
leading advertisers are affirming their 
regard for television as a distinct and 
separate advertising medium. 

In an interview with sponsor, a 
Lever Brothers spokesman reported 
that although Lever has earmarked 
$1,500,000 for TV in 1950. none of 
this money would be taken from other 
media. The advertising budget has 
been expanded to accommodate a new 
medium which does not substitute for 
any other. 

The 2 January sponsor reported a 
similar policy by Procter & Gamble 
(see page 62). Although P&G will ex- 
pand its use of TV in 1950. chiefly on 
an experimental basis, it will analvze 
the needs of each of its many products 
medium b\ medium to decide where 
the TV money should stem from. Af- 
ter analysis, it ma\ come from news- 
papers, or magazines, or radio — or 
perhaps from a completely new source. 

This trend is good news to radio. 
Throughout most of 1949 advertisers 
were too frequently getting their bap- 
tism in TV at the unwarranted expense 
of the aural medium. Some of this 
will naturally continue, but the signs 
are clear and bright. 

After all, does an advertiser neces- 
saril) reduce his schedule in Life be- 
cause there's a job to be done in the 
Denver I'ost? 



Applause 



A job well done 

It s unusual for a publication to 
publicl) commend it- ou n staff. 

But SPONSOR has never been known 
for faithfulness to 1 radition. 

'I lie \ oeman sei \ ice rendered the 
i adio industi \ and this publication by 
Mile- David, managing editor, and 
Frank Bannister, senior editor, in the 
preparation of the Souvenir Issue of 
i n.ii i mm. in vi i \\ ks wai rants com- 



ment. 

Starling from scratch earl\ in De- 
cember, David and Bannister under- 
took the intricate task of building a 
standout issue around a single subject. 
The) were detached from other duties 
and assisted b\ other members of the 
editorial department. Bui the plan- 
ning and follow through was theirs. 

I he) worked eat I) and late. I heir 
ingenuit) was amazing. Now that the 
issue i- out the resull ol theii efforts 



can be assessed. We'll wrap up the 
man) enthusiastic comment- in the 

words ol ■ industr) leader - "\ didn t 

I- now an i--ue could be this good. I his 
will drive the printed media boys 
craz) . 

The industr) is now making full use 
ol the Souvenir Issue as a "take home 

keepsake of the dim. and the 8.000 

copies added to sponsor's normal press 
run will soon lie exhausted. The boys 
can lie proud of their efforts. 



64 



SPONSOR 



ff*.y • 

/Kansas Cityvl 



*\VS .'\\ 



Trade Area 

| %Does^| ;, ,- 4 
&XRun in Circles I 



^. \> - 





Kansas City's rectangular PrimaryTrade Area, 
as shown on the maps, has been established 
by the Chamber of Commerce of Kansas City. 
The natural flow of trade to and from this area 
is dependent on Kansas City, the Trade capital. 
As a result, The KMBC-KFRM team has been 



The True Area is an 
East-West Rectangle 

ana... 

Only 

The KMBC-KFRM Team 

Covers it Effectively 

and Economically 



custom-built to provide complete, effective 
and economical radio coverage of the Primary 
Trade area, without waste circulation! That's 
why The KMBC-KFRM Team is your best buy 
intheHeartof America! Contact KMBC-KFRM 
or any Free & Peters "Colonel" for full details. 




MBC-KFRM 



6TH OLDEST CBS AFFILIATE 



PROGRAMMED BY KMBC 



v< 



^s 



Switch to Escape ! 












fj 



L 



Several million people know 
that a good way to get away 
from it all is to flip a radio 
switch and listen to "Escape." 

For "Escape" is a one-way ticket 
away from the humdrum. It's 
high adventure in far places, as 
told by the world's best tellers 
— in the tradition of Kipling, 
Conrad, Bierce, Stevenson, Poe. 

All this comes tidily wrapped 
in a CBS Package that's been 
steadily snatching high ratings 
right out from under the nose 
of top-Hooper comedy. 

Very good for a sponsor who 
likes to get away from it all 
—at a profit. 



V 



7 



\\ 



A CBS 

PACKAGE 

PROGRAM 



>4&*hti<7tk. 



27 FEBRUARY 1950 • $8.00 a Year 




The farmer 
wants to buy— p. 19 

Even TV plugs out-of-home listening — See digest page 



t M 3 N 

V?VTd ii3T13J3XDOa 02 

3 8 N 
S 3 00 3 H Z 

OS- 



' 



Renew 



, Mr. Sponsor 
0. Parker 
cComas 




page I" 



Taylor- 
| Reeds 
j Growth 

page 22 




HOW TO 
PLOW AND 
PLANT IN 
RICHMOND 



It took a lot of plowing and planting, 

tilling and toiling to harvest 

the bumper crop of listeners 

the Havens & Marrin stations deliver in 

Virginia's first market. 

Pioneers in radio and television both, 

WMBG, WTVR and WCOD are as much a part of 

prosperous Richmond as its traditions 

and landmarks. They are as close to its 

people, their likes and tastes, as you'd 

want your national sales message to go. 

A Blair representative will be glad to 

amplify the facts. 



Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
Represented nationally by 
John Blair & Company. 




TS... SPONSOR REPORTS.. 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



Radio growing faster 
than newspapers 



Pepsodent president 

follows Luckman 

lead 

Arthur Godfrey: 

sponsor 

extraordinary 



Fresh fruit packers 

revamping sales-ad 

techniques 



National rep 
realignments 



March month of 
film showings 



27 February 1950 

Morning and evening newspapers currently printed total 52,271,000, 
according to N. W. Ayer & Son's Directory of Newspapers and Periodi- 
cals. This is 6% increase since war's end, but radio's growth 
quadruples that with about 25% set increase in same period. RMA 
estimates radio set output in 1949 at 8,000,000. Listening averaged 
156,000,000 hours daily during January-March 1946; jumped to 
200,000,000 hours during January-March 1949. 

-SR- 
As this issue went to press H. F. Woulfe, Pepsodent president, had 
handed his resignation to one of Lever Brothers British directors who 
had accepted Charles Luckman' s resignation several weeks earlier. 

-SR- 
Latest radio salesman to join sponsor ranks is Arthur Godfrey, who 
will endorse Hi-V Corporation frozen orange juice and food concen- 
trates not only as a user but a manufacturer as well. Both Godfrey 
and his manager are newly elected directors of company. Competitive 
angle looms with Bing Crosby in identical role for Minute Maid. 
Trend is indicative of unique selling value of air personalities. 

-SR- 
Radio-sparked success of frozen orange juices (Minute Maid and 
others) is arousing competitive urge of fresh fruit packers in Cali- 
fornia. As defensive measures, packers are overhauling sales and 
advertising methods, intensifying efforts, maybe on cooperative basis. 

-SR- 
1950 looms as year of station representative readjustments. First is 
formation of H-R Representatives Inc., offshoot of Headley-Reed, 
affiliate of newspaper rep firm Kelly-Smith. Authoritative repre- 
sentative source states that at least two more schisms are in the 
making. H-R Representatives, headed by Frank M. Headley and Dwight 
Reed, start with three stations, including KMPC. With some 25 
contract expirations among Headley-Reed list during 1950, there are 
plenty of targets to shoot at. 

-SR- 
Gordon Gray, president of the All-Radio Presentation Committee, Inc., 
has been invited to speak at one of the earliest "Lightning That 
Talks" area filmings, at Kansas City, 7 March. Judge Justin Miller, 
president of NAB and Maurice B. Mitchell, BAB head, have been invited 
to Cleveland showing, 20 March. Other area premieres will attract 
industry leaders. 



Jerry Glynn Head* Walker Company Chicago Office 

Jerry Glynn has resigned as Chicago manager of SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS to take 
charge of the midwest office of The Walker Company, station representatives. 
Miss L. Most, who assisted Mr. Glynn, will take charge of the Chicago office 
until further notice. 



SPONSOR. Volume 1. No. 5, 27 February. 1950 Published biweekly for SPONSOR Publication- Ine al 3110 h'lra Ave., Baltimore 11. Md. Executive. Editorial. Circulation Offlce 
510 Madison \v<> Nan York 22. fS a year In D S 19 elsewhere Entered as second class matter 29 .lanuary 1949 at Baltimore. Ml postofflce under Act 3 March 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR R 



1950 year of 
"biggest" budgets 
among advertisers 



Sindlinger on radio 
in TV homes 



What makes 
Resistab sell? 



TV freeze may 
end around April 



Benny formula 
key to stardom 



Thursday night is 
tops for listening 



Howdy-Doody 
bonanza 



Evidence piles up daily that firms are out to do biggest ad job in 
1950. Example: single morning's mail contains Conoco release on 
53,000,000 advertising appropriation (largest in history). Radio 
campaign including announcements on 57 stations in major markets and 
"March of Time" TV movie is largest for company history. Mastic 
Acres Inc., Long Island real estate development firm, announces 
$200,000 advertising budget (largest in history). Campaign includes 
announcements on radio and TV, foreign-language programs. Ford 
Theatre goes from biweekly TV schedule to weekly. Oakite Products 
Inc. will use 20 radio and 3 TV stations this spring (largest 
schedule in history). 

-SR- 
Sindlinger Radox system, on constant watch in Philadelphia radio-TV 
homes, reports this three-point transition after TV enters the 
picture: (1) radio listening stops almost completely; (2) after six 
months radio starts coming back, mostly music listening; (3) after 
one year radio resumed on definite but selective and limited pattern 
(same applies to TV). 

-SR- 
Kenyon Research Company, adjunct of K&E, traces first sales for 
Bristol-Myers' antihistaminic cold tablets Resistab chiefly to radio 
advertising, newspaper advertising, new product articles. Some 18% 
of people interviewed in Columbus, Ohio and New York City specified 
radio as reason they bought. Wallace Drew, Resistab ad manager, calls 
this proof of impact of large scale radio advertising. 

-SR- 
Despite vehement protests of Senator Johnson, best informed industry 
sources believe lengthy TV station freeze will end sometime in April. 
While FCC is wary of crossing Johnson congressional committee, feel- 
ing is that public pressure will force early lifting of ban. At 
least one commissioner has come out publicly for more stations. 
Color question is chief reason for congressional holdback. 

-SR- 
Jack Benny technique of carefully planned spontaneity, called by some 
art of being entertainingly natural, is bringing Benny proteges star- 
dom in own vehicles. Dennis Day and Phil Harris have succeeded in 
mastering the prepared ad-lib. Now Rochester is branching out with 
CBS with 5-weekly series, probably for Franco-American. 

-SR- 
Nielsen extra-week report for 8-14 January reveals Thursday top 
listening night in week with five of top 20 programs. Sunday and 
Wednesday tie with four. Monday and Tuesday tie with three. Saturday 
has one, Friday none. Eight of the top 20 are mystery drama. All 
20 reach over 6,000,000 homes, with No. 1 Lux Radio Theatre exceeding 
10,000,000. 

-SR- 
Mars Inc. (Three Musketeers Candy Bar) corralled 240,000 dimes and 
wrappers as result of two 90-second sales talks on Howdy-Doody TV 
program over NBC-TV offering cardboard model of Howdy. Mars plans 
new premium promotions via Grant Advertising. 

-please turn to page 36- 
SPONSOR 



NO. 9 OF A SERIES 



«S 



&&& 



DEMPSEY-TUNNEY 
In Boxing, - 

WHEC 
In Rochester 



*&& 







I 



I0tf« TIM 



u*n* SH "' 



WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 
Note WHEC's leadership morning, afternoon, evening: 





STATION STATION STATION 


STATION 


STATION 


STATION 




WHEC B C 


D 


E 


F 


MORNING 


43.5 14.3 12.2 


3.4 


19.8 


4.2 


8:00-12:00 Noon 










Monday through Fri. 










AFTERNOON 


35.5 23.5 9.2 


14.8 


10.5 


3.5 


12:00-6:00 P.M. 










Monday through Fri. 








Station 


EVENING 


37.9 24.3 7.4 


7.8 


11.0 


Brood casts 
till Sunset 


6:00-10:30 P.M. 

Sunday through Sat. 


NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 

Lateit before closing 


HOOPER, 


1949 


Only 











BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 




N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT- McKINNEY, Inc. New York, Chicago, LEE F. O' CON NELL CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



27 FEBRUARY 1950 




S pints or Reports I 

.»I0 Mtitlison Are. fi 

On The If iff « 



Mr. Sponsor: 

O. Parker McCtnnas 16 



P.S. 17 

Mr. Sponsor Asks 38 

TV Results #0 

.Sponsor Speaks H4 

Applause H4 
Cover 

Cover this isrue does double duty: it 
shows typical women's TV show on KNBH, 
Hollywood, and out-of-home radio listen- 
ing. (Stories on pages 26 and 24.) 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 
Managing Editor: Miles David 
Senior Editors: f-rank M. Bannister, Ellen Davis, 
Irving Marder 

Assistant Editors: Joe Gould, Fred Birnbaum, 

Arnold Alpert 
Art Director: Howard Wechsler 
Vice-President - advertising: Norman Knight 
Advertising Director: Lester J. Blumenthal 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(West Coast Manager), M. L. LeBlang. 
Beatrice Turner, William Ethe, Edna Yergin 

Vice-President & Business Manager: Bernard 
Piatt 

Circulation Department: Ann Ostrow, Emily 

Cutillo, Victoria Woods 
Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 

Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS. 
INC. Executive, Editorial, and Advertising Offices: 510 
Madison Ave . [Sew York 22. N V Telephone: Murray 
Hill m '2:72 Chicago Office 860 N Michigan Avenue. 
Telephone financial 1556 Printing Office: mm Elm 
Ave . Baltimore 1 1 . Md I ' states 

18 a yei Canada foreign $0. singlo coplei 50c. 

Printed In U s A. Address all correspondence to 510 
Madiion Arrnue, New York 22. N Y. Copyright 1950 
8P0N80R PUBLICATIONS. INC. 



5 



27 February 1950 




ARTICLES 
The farmer wants to buy 

With 5,270 rural homes electrified each day, appliance dealers are overdue 
on radio. They are passing up huge potential market 

ffotr to eraek a stone wall 

What part radio played in Taylor-Reed Corporation's 1949 $2,000,000 gross. 
Story of two Yalemen who crashed the New York market with a dessert product 



The hiy plus 

Out-of-home listening is a factor sponsors must taken into account now that 
detailed research figures are becoming available on regular basis 



ffotr TV sells wont en 

Day and night programs do effective job for wide range of products 

BMEt posers for spnnsors 

Three top questions on how to use the new radio measurement 

Markets on the mure 

Transit radio, currently in 19 areas, piles up exceptional results 

TV dictionary 

Part two of the most complete compilation of TV terms and definitions gath- 
ered to date. Herbert True was the compiler 



IN FUTURE ISSUES 



Keep your proipram natural 

Planned spontaneity is a fire art with many a sponsor and station 

Radio is havkslap-happy 

Peabody award tops SPONSOR'S ballot, but there's no redwood in the forest 
of radio awards 



19 



22 



2T 



2H 



28 



SO 



31 



March 13 



March II 



Bftepttrtment store radio 

Department stores in many parts of the country are using radio 
results. This refutes an old "tradition" 



I/. S. Steel on the ttir 

Theatre Guild programs make friends for an industrial giant 



. . with great 




why buy 2 or more... 

do one big job on "Radio Baltimore" 



H* WBAL covers the rich Baltimore area, Maryland, 
and sizable chunks of Virginia, Delaware and 
Pennsylvania — an area with over 4,225,000 
people who spend more than $3,290,000,000 
annually in retail sales. 

Represented nationally by Edward Petry Co., Inc. 



WBAL 

50,000 Watts 
NBC Affiliate 



21 FEBRUARY 1950 



11 Hollywood Theater 
of Stara Is an 
excellent buy 11 



say 
sponsors 




and 
stations . . . 



HOLLYWOOD THEATER OF STARS is building out- 
standing sales records for local sponsors in many markets. 
Its top talent, scripting, and production may be available 
for sponsorship in your market area. Check your local 
station for availabilities and costs or write direct to: 

C. P. MacGREGOR 

RADIO'S OLDEST SYNDICATED PROGRAM SERVICE 

729 South Western Ave. Los Angeles, California 



510 Madison 



FARM COMMERCIALS STUDY 

In your Farm Facts Handbook there 
is an article on pages 26, 27 and 28 
called "The Faltering Farm Commer- 
cial."" In this article you write about 
radio commercials PGR tested bv the 
University of Oklahoma. 

Since two of the commercials listed 
were on Nutrena Feeds for our client. 
Nutrena Mills Inc, we are interested in 
learning more about this study and the 
conclusions reached by Mr. Sherman 
P. Lawton. Where can we get more 
complete information on this studv. 
such as separate ratings on each com- 
mercial, and a comparison with other 
commercials tested? 

John C. Harvey 
Bruce B. Brewer & Co 
Kansas City, Missouri 

• In reply to many inquiries Sherman P. Law- 

Ion can be reached by writing Coordinator of 

It. nli... The University of Oklahoma, Norman, 
Oklahoma. 



WHAS NOTES AN OMISSION 

In your 2 January issue on "Louis- 
ville's Mr. Sponsor" you stated in sev- 
eral different places that the Greater 
Louisville Association started in radio 
back in 1925. but you never said which 
station. 

C. W. Sanders 

Publicity Director 

WHAS 

Louisville 

• The omission was unintentional. The station 
was WHAS. which, like Greater Louisville, Is a 
Louisville institution. 



342 Madison Avenue 
New York City, New York 



5 N. Wabash Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



LIGHTNING THAT TALKS ISSUE 

Please accept my most sincere con- 
gratulations on your souvenir issue of 
30 January dealing with LIGHTNING 
THAT TALKS. 

This issue contains so much perti- 
nent and valuable information about 
the movie as to become almost a hand- 
book on it and, as a matter of fact, it 
inspired me to write today to Maurice 
Mitchell asking if there will be such a 
handbook available for giving away in 
connection with showings of the film. 

In an\ event. I would appreciate it 
ver\ much if \ ou could arrange to 
send me two extra copies of this 30 
January issue as straight sales ammu- 
nition. 



SPONSOR 



" 




[ TALLAHASSEE 

5000 Watts — Day and Night 



the center of 



Capitaland 

Selling 

12 

Georgia Counties 

and 

11 

Florida Counties 

Ask your John Blair 
man to tell you the full 
story on Capitaland and 
North Florida's most 
powerful radio voice — 
WTAL! 

Southeastern Rep. 

Harry E. Cummings 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

WTAL 

TALLAHASSEE 

John H. Phipps, Owner 
L. Herschel Graves, Gen'l Mgr. 

FLORIDA GROUP 

Columbia 
Broadcasting 

System 

27 FEBRUARY 1950 



sponsor is so thorough!) read 
marked, learned and inwardl) digest- 
ed around here that I find it difficul 
to keep our file of copies rompl •!<■ 
since the l>o\s are all too inclined to 
stash away really valuable issues a' 
home. One such issue was your 12 
September issue of last year in which 
you deal with the Lazarsfeld stud\ on 
the comparative effect of newspaper 
ads and radio commercials. If you 
have available an extra copy of that 
issue I would like to have it too. or 
failing that, information on where we 
might secure a copy of the actual stud} 
itself. 

Again please accept my congratula 
tions on the latest of the series of top 
notch industry jobs. 

G. F. Keeble 
Station Manager 
CFCF 
Montreal 



The Number 



CROOVIES BOOCIE IN GROOVE 

I read with great interest your re- 
cent articles on the forgotten 15 mil- 
lion and how some stations had cashed 
in on the potential buying power of 
the Negro population. 

I am sorry you did not query 
KWKH because we could have con 
tributed a great deal to your article in 
the way of facts and figures resulting 
from our 45-minute reeord show in the 
late afternoon called Groovie's Boogie. 
This show features one of our staff an- 
nouncers who portrays a Negro disk 
jockey and does a bang-up job of it. 
Once each year this disk show is put 
on at the Louisiana State Fair on Ne- 
gro day and the crowds are so large 
thev are unmanageable. He receive? 
200 to 300 requests per day and when 
a special request is made it is not un- 
usual to receive anywhere from 500 to 
1.000 letters per day. The success 
stories of the products advertised on 
this program are terrific. 

Henry B. Clay 
General Manager 
KWKH 
Shreveport 



RADIO STILL THE BASIC BUY 

It is my feeling that radio and tele- 
vision must both be considered in the 
same budget thinking — that one does 
i ['lease turn to page 42 I 




in the Number 



KMA 

Shenandoah, Iowa 
ABC Affiliate 



Mail Pull Studies, Conlan 
Coincidental Surveys, and 
BMB prove KMA superi- 
ority (The Number 1 Farm 
Station) in 184 counties 
in Iowa, Nebraska, Kan- 
sas, and Missouri (The 
Number 1 Farm Market). 
Cet all the facts about 
KMA. 

Represented By 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



TELEVISION 
CENTER 

"cZaha, Nebraska 



Under Management of 

MAY BROADCASTING CO. 

Shenandoah, Iowa 




Radio stations resent 
Army snub of medium 

There is mounting dissatisfaction among radio stations, ex- 
pressed in letters to Congressmen, over the Army snub of 
radio as an ad medium. Radio stations, always devoting 
free time for recruiting purposes and public service ap- 
peals, feel the Army should allot some of its ad budget to 
radio. Resentment stems from government practice of 
paying for newspaper and magazine ads while looking for 
free airings on radio for the same plug. 

Phonevision to get 
Chicago area test 

With FCC approval, 300 Chicago families will get a chance 
to see first-run motion pictures in their homes. Under the 
Zenith "phonevision" system, the telephone operator will 
switch video viewers to the special transmitter wavelength. 
The cost: one dollar for each program. Zenith figures it 
will cost them $500, 000 for the experiment even though 
subscribers pay one dollar for each motion picture they 
see. The experiment is expected to get under way in a 
few months. 

Food & Drug Administration expresses 
attitude on anti-histamines 

While anti-histamine manufacturers are spending millions 
of dollars in spot radio and other media, the Food & Drug 
Administration is highly skeptical about the cold tablets. 
The Administration is not in a position, as yet, to take any 
action since controlled studies of the effectiveness of the 
cold tabids will have to be made over long periods of lime. 
Until then, evidence for or against the remedies cant be 
submitted. 

Census should reveal 
radio sales possibilities 

Advertisers using spot radio can glean some helpful facts 
from the forthcoming census figures. While census officials 
don't start until I April, sample surveys reveal the follow- 
ing: the number of families has increased since 1940 by 
6,300,000 to about 38,500,000. That means new sales for 
radio and other appliance manufacturers. A 23 percent 

in rease in the number of children means more of a de- 
mand for family products as contrasted with products used 
1>\ individuals. 



Color TV hearings 
resume on 27 February 

The FCC will resume its hearings on comparative color 
I \ transmitting systems on 27 February in Washington. 
Involved are Color Television Inc., RCA and CBS. The 
CT1 system, like RAC's, works in black and white without 
a converter; it delivers usable black and white pictures to 
existing sets. The CBS system delivers a black and white 
picture only if an adapter is used on the receiver. 

FTC finds few radio 
commercials questionable 

I he Federal Trade Commission reports on its continuing 
survey of broadcast ad practices after having examined 
493,528 commercial radio continuities. Of these, onl\ 

12,879 broadcast scripts, or about 2.6 percent, were marked 
as having made questionable representations. 

Dairy interests may seek 
legal aid against oleo 

The dairy senators do not intend to let their "butter inter- 
est" constituents down. Their next move may be to get 
legislation empowering the FTC to act against oleo manu- 
facturers who say ad-wise that oleo is a dairy product. 
Look for a butter vs. oleo radio ad battle. 

RMA opposed to 
TV excise tax 

The Radio Manufacturers Association is opposed to a ten 
percent excise tax on TV sets. Reason: it will retard the 
industry. The Association points out the present ten per- 
cent excise tax imposed on radios. It was levied in 1941 
as a national defense measure, justifiable at the time, but 
still hasn't been lifted. 

Treasury Department 
comments on quiz prizes 

The Treasury Department reports that radio quiz prizes 
should be included in taxable income at fair market value 
I the average price of the prize I and not necessarily at the 
higher value advertised on the program. Break The Bank, 
Hit The Jackpot, Stop The Music winners and countless 
other radio quiz winners can pay heed. 

Wants to give FCC power to 
prohibit horse race broadcasts 

■A measure to give the FCC power to ban broadcasts 30 
minutes immediateh before and after horse races if they 
conflict with state laws has been introduced by Representa- 
tive Charles E. Bennett iD-Fla.i. Proposal is designed 
to cover wire communications and would attempt to lessen 
illegal gambling activities. The FCC. not the legislation, 
would outlaw the broadcasts. 

TV set sales hampered 
by illegal practices 

The National Television Dealers Association reports that 
thousands of television dealers face financial ruin because 
nl alleged malpractices. The association will complain to 

government authorities. Among the charges are complaints 
of tie-in sale-, discriminator) discounts, and competition 
from direct factory dealers. 



8 



SPONSOR 




LISTENING 
HABITS IN 




Conlan's on-the-spot study — NOT A 
MEMORY TEST— proves the bulk of listeners 
in 22 Iowa Counties prefer KXEL — prefer its 
fine programs — its warm personalities — its 
strong signal that assures easy, relaxed listen- 
ing. Sales of smart KXEL advertisers show 
that KXEL-endorsed products out-sell in this 
rich Iowa market. 

No other radio station delivers as many listeners 
in this great rural area for SO FEW DOLLARS. 

The truth that hurts is brought out in Iowa's 
largest, most complete, most recent listener study 
. . . that without KXEL you pay a high price 
for "listeners" who aren't there! Ask your 
Avery-Knodel man to see the NEW CONLAN. 

Radio Time Buyers — aren't fooled by a 
SIMPLE SIMON MEMORY TEST! Get the 
Simon-pure facts on Listening Habits in Iowa 
and you too will buy KXEL. 



HAUILIOX XtABIM 



WIS 




BOONC STORV 



CTIC 



Wl$, 



»V t '. s 

ILL. 



JO'tCi |J»CKS0N 



LL. 



issp what -as 

HAPPENED IN THese 
22 'OWA COONHES 



WATERLOO 

METROPOLITAN 

AREA 



KXEL 



DES MOINES — NBC — 
50,000 WATTS 



CEDAR RAPIDS — CBS- 
5,000 WATTS 



WATERLOO — Station A 

Independent 



WATERLOO — Station B 



MORNING 
PERIODS 



37.9 



11.6 



22.2 



17.6 



7.1 



AFTERNOON 
PERIODS 



35.2 



20.3 



15.3 



16.1 



5.8 



EVENING 
PERIODS 



33.5 



26.7 



34.1 



ENTIRE 
SURVEY 



35.0 



21.2 



24.9 



9.5 



3.6 



m 



RURAL 
AREA 


MORNING 
PERIODS 


AFTERNOON 
PERIODS 


EVENING 
PERIODS 


ENTIRE 
SURVEY 


KXEL 


29.8 


28.8 


25.6 


27.8 


DES MOINES — NBC — 
50,000 WATTS 


18.9 


21.7 


25.6 


22.5 


CEDAR RAPIDS— CBS — 
5,000 WATTS 


21.0 


19.8 


26.2 


22.6 



Distribution of Listening Homes. Figures taken from November 1949 Conlan Study of 
Listening Habits — in Metropolitan Waterloo and 22-county area. 
EMBRACING 52,033 INTERVIEWS 



KXEL 



50,000 WATTS 



ABC 



JOSH HIGGINS BROADCASTING COMPANY • WATERLOO, IOWA 
Represented by Ayery-Knodtl, Inc. ■ ARC OUTLET FOR CEDAR RAPIDS AND WATERLOO, Iowa 




See what else the South's 

Greatest Salesman gives you: 



Advertising for our advertisers every 
day 24 sheet posters, streetcar dash 
signs, full-page newspaper adver- 
tisements, store displays, work 
with jobbers and leading 
retailers — WWL uses 
all of these — the 
greatest audience- 
building program 
in the South. 





He racks up leading Hoopers — 
gets biggest share of audience 

Latest Hooper shows WWL share-of-audience ahead 
of any New Orleans station. Nighttime WWL has 
greater share than next 2 stations combined! 



10 



SPONSOR 



South's Greatest Salesman 
Helps Raise Better Crops 



Farmers in 7 states profit from WWL's varied farm program. WWL 
helps them harvest bigger, more profitable crops— and sells them all 
the while! Only WWL directs herd improvement contests, provides 
weather and market reports, on-the-scene rural broadcasts, 4-H Club 
programs. 




He's a favorite 
all over the map 

WWL primary coverage covers a two- 
billion-dollar trading area. 50,000 
watts, clear channel, and top program- 
ming makes folks turn first to WWL. 




JV <■— 



-x-v 



50,000 WATTS 



CLEAR CHANNEL 



CBS AFFILIATE 



A DEPARTMENT OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

21 FEBRUARY 1950 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE KATZ AGENCY 



11 



4/*e 

PAUL II. It \V>li:iK COMPANY 

// tarrff/tt announced 
t/te a/t/ieintmenJ ' ct 

m:v\oiJ» it. Kit AFT 

a.i 'f ice -^te.ifWej*/ and ' - i/fntaaet ei ' SJe/eei.iwn 

For over 18 years Ren Kraft has been a leader in (he sales and 
advertising field — 13 of these years being spent as a specialist in 
Radio and Television. 

During the past 5 years — as Sales Manager of NBC's network 
and loeal television sales — Mr. Kraft played a pioneering role in 
the development of the basic sales policies, rate structures, pro- 
gram approaches and other problems during Television's tender, 
formative years. 

Today the Paid H. Ravmer Company is proud to make his 
services., .and his outstanding experience freely available to tele- 
vision stations. . .advertising agencies... and television advertiser-. 

\\ e are happy to welcome Mr. Kraft to our organization. And 
we pledge thai our Television Department will give to Television 
the same practical, efficient service that, for the past 17 years, 
has made the Paul H. Ravmer Company a leader in radio station 
representation. 




PAIL II. RAYMEB COMPANY, Inc. 

Radio and Television Advertising 

New York Boston Detroit Chicago Hollywood San Francisco 
12 SPONSOR 



AV'ir and renew 



27 February l?>.TO 




These reports appear in alternate issues 



New National Spot Business 



SPONSOR 


PRODUCT 


AGENCY 






STATIONS-MARKETS 


Block Drag Co 

Ban-Ami 


Vmm-i-Denl 

Cleanser 


Cecil «!C Presbrej 

(N. Y.) 
BBD&O (V \ 1 






13 cities in N.E., Midwest 

and Pacific Coast 
1(> markets 


California Fruit Itread 
K. 1. DnPonl 


Baked goods 

Nylons 


J. B. K. ii. t In. 

(L. A.) 
BBD&O (N. Y.) 






I markets; Pacific Coast 


E. I. DnPonl 

Filch 

Clans Container 

Manufacturers Institute 


M anufactarers 

Shampoo 
Bottles 


BBD&O (N. Y.) 
Harry B. Cohen 
Foote. Cone A 
<N. Y.) 


<N. 
I.I, 


Y.) 

■ IE 


60 stns; 10 markets 

Natl; 73-100 st.i* 

23 cities east of Rockies 


Cold Seal Co 

Murine Co 

O'Keefc & Merrill Co 

Southern California 
Citrus Poods 
Vacuum Foods 


Glass W ax 

Eye 1. in. .11 
Ca> range* 

Frozen orange juire 

Minute Maid orange 
juice 


Campbell-Mlthun 

(Minneapolis) 
BBD&O (Chicago) 
It. B. Atchinson Co 

<L. .4.) 
J. Walter Thompson 

(L. A.) 
Doherty, Clifford & 

Shenfield <N. Y.) 




14 midwest markets 

over lOO markets 
29 stns; West 

Seattle 

.N.it'I; -'" major markets 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 
Test campaign; Jan 23; Hi wks 
-.■in.- market*) 15 -min women's pro* 

cram- arc used on a 52-v%k con- 
Iraet; spots in other markets on 



26-wk I... . 



Spots 



-liov, - : Jan 2.'. : 



Partic on hum 
13 wks 

Spots; Jan 2.'.; 13 *k- 

Spots; March 13 

Early morning disc jockies ami wom- 
en's shows participation- ; April ; 
13 *k- 

Spot-; Feb 27; 1 A wk- 

Spots ; 1.1. 1 5 ; indefinite period 
Spots ; Jan 16; 52 v» k- 

Spots ; partic, Feb 15 ; 6 n k ■ 

One- m in spots and chain break-. ; Feb 
6; 16 vtk- split into |mu eight- 

week sessions separated l»> a four- 
week hiatus 



Station Representation Changes 



STATION 

KROC, Rochester, Minnesota 
WCEC, Rocky Mount, N. C. 
WF^AII, Fau Claire, Wisconsin 
WF.BC. Dululh. Minnesota 
WFNC, Favetteville, N. C. 
WGN1 Wilmington, N. C. 
■7CTC, t;reenville, N. C, 
WHIT, New Bern. N. C. 
WIIl.lt, Virginia. Minnesota 
WISC, Madison, Wisconsin 
WJMC, Bice Lake, Wisconsin 
WJKC, Jacksonville, N. C. 
Willi East Liverpool, Ohio 
WMFG, Ilibbing, Minnesota 
WRAL, Raleigh, N. C. 
WTIK. Durham, N. C. 



AFFILIATION 

NBC 

Kits 

NBC 

NBC 

MBS 

MBS 

Tobacco 

MBS 

NBC 

ABC 

MBS 

MBS 

Independent 

NBC 

MBS 

Tobacco 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Ra-Tel 


Representatives, 


N. 


Y. 


Forjoe 


& Co. N. V 






Ba-Tel 


Representatit »■>. 


N. 


\ 


Ba-Tel 


Representatives, 


V 


> 


r'orjoe 


& Co. N. Y. 






Forjoe 


& Co, N. V. 






Forjoe 


& Co. N. Y. 






Forjoe 


& Co, N. Y. 






Ra-Tel 


Representatives. 


N. 


V. 


Ra-Tel 


Representatives, 


V 


> 


Ba-Tel 


Reprcsenlati* es, 


N. 


Y. 


Forjoe 


& Co, N. Y. 






w illi. mi G. Rambeau. N. Y. 


Ra-Tel 


B .'present at i\ .«. 


N. 


Y 


Forjoe 


& Co. N. Y. 






Forjoe 


& Co, N. Y. 







Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 

S. J .i tin- - Andrews 
Bill S. Rallinger 
Edith Dunn Boyle 
Robert Buchanan 
Homer J. Buekley 
Storv F. Chappell 
Albert M. Chop 
Maurice C. Coleman 

John - i j in 
Robert W. Day 
Samuel Frankel 
Robert H. Cass 
Ruth Coren 
Rob i.M-Hi. 

Kenneth F. R. Creem 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



d-dtr 



Paramount Pictures, H'wood., 

Chicago tv dir and prod 

John A. Cairns A Co inc. N.Y., fashion publicity 

Northwestern C, Evan tit on, radio pub rel dir 

Homer J. Buckley & \--ociate-. Chi., pres 

Cunningham & W ,1-1. N. V., copy dept 



WATL, Atlanta, mgr 

Charles R. Stuart, S.F., acct exec 
H. B. Humphrey Co, N.Y., tv dir 

Lawrence Boles Hicks Inc. N.Y., vp 
Evans- Winter Co, Detroit, ad^ ami s|s prom mgr 
Kenvon & Eckhardt, N. Y\, asst dir of tv dept 
Homer J. Bncklej A Associates, Chi., prod and 

traffic mpr 
Kastor, Earrell. Chesley A Clifford Ine, N.Y., 
acct exec 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Maxon Ine, N.Y., asst to pres in charge of radio, tv 

Camp be! I -Ew aid Co, IV. Y., head of new programing department 

Same, dir of pub 

^ oiing A Rubicam, Chi., radio supervisor 

Same, chairman of board 

Same, acet exec 

Criswold-Eshleman, Cleve., asst aeet exec 

Returned to his own agency, Maurice C. Coleman A Assoc., 

Atlanta 
Dake, S.F., acct exec 

Lynn Baker Ine, N.Y., dir of rad, tr 
Emil Mogul Co, N.Y., ccct exec 
/immer- Keller Ine, Detroit, acet exec 
I.oise Mark & Assoc., Milwaukee. >p 
Same, vp 

Same, vp 



O In iie.vi issue; ><••< and Renewed on \etworks. Sponsor Personnel (battues. 

National Broadeast Sales Executive Changes, .Yete Agency lppoiiifitierif* 



>«'«( and Renewed 27 February 1950 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes (Continued) 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



James K. Hanna 
T. King-Hed linger 
Harvey Hickman 
Edward N. Hoffman 
Roland E. Jacob son 
Lawrence R. I. each 
Frank Linder 
Buxton P. Lowry 
L. C. MacGlashan 
Robert I.. Madden 
John Monsarrat 
Harry W. Morris 
Alfred 8. Moss 
Julian C. Murphy 

John Newman 

Harry A. Palmer 

Carl Press 

Richard E. Rlchman 

Scott Robertson 

Don Ross 

E. E. If., il.i ...... 

Karl Scfanllinger 
James C. Shelby 
Robert Shelby 
Hubert C. Sherk 
C. L. Smith 
Pat Sweeney 

Jack Switzer 
Richard I Tevis 
J. William Wade 
Kenneth H. Ward 



N. Y. Aver, N.Ti .. vp and mgr radio dept 

Palm & Patterson Inc. Cleve., ropy chief 

John Freiburg & Co, L.A. 

Wexton Co, N.Y. 

I in. It .in .in & Co. L.A. 

Lever Bros., N.Y,, brand adv mgr 

McCann>Erickson. Bogota, Colombia, mgr 

John II. K iordan Co. L.A., copy chief 

Gardner, St. L., exec vp 

Hill & Knowlton, Washington 

Piatt -Forbes, N.Y., acct exec 

KCO, S.F.. bIs 

Tracy, Kent & Co., N.Y., acct exec 

National Association of Home Builders. Washing- 
ton 

International Artist 
dir 

Foreign Advertising a 
acct exec 

WKRC, Cincinnati, put: 

Lew K.i link acct exec 

Homer J. Buckley & Associates, Chi., exec vp 

Head of own personal management business 

Campbell-Ewald Co, N.Y., vp 

Pedlar & Ryan, ILwood., mgr 

MeCann-Erickson, Chicago 

Norse Industrial, N.Y. 

Maxon Ine, N. Y. 

Ruthrauff «& Ryan, N.Y., acet exec 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, N.Y., pub re) a 
prom dir 

KLZ, Denver, special events and promotion 

Boone, Sugg, Tevis & Walden, partner 

John A. Cairns & Co Inc, N.Y., dir of pub rel 

Schoenfeld, Huber & Green, Chi., acct exec 



Corp, N.Y., adv and publ 
and Service Bureau, N.Y., 
1 dir 



Same, vp in charge of radio, tv 

Same, vp 

Hal Stebbins. L.A., acct exec 

William Yon Zehle & Co, N.Y.. acct exec 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, L.A., acct exec 

Benton & Bowles. N.Y.. acct exec (General Foods) 

Same, N.Y., service supervisor 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, L.A., acct exec 

Kudner, N.Y., exec 

Madden Associates, L.A., acct exec 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger Inc. N.Y., acct exec 

Vernon, S.F., acct exec 

Gordon & Rudwick, N.Y., vp 

Grant] N.Y., dir of pub rel 

TV-Programs Inc. N.Y., dir of adv and prog prom 

Same, vp 

Chester C. Moreland, Cinucinnati. vp 

Same, dir publicity 

Same, pres 

TV-Programs Inc. N.Y., dir of sis 

Same, genl mgr 

Young & Rubicam, N.Y., radio, tv supervisor 

Same, radio, tv dir 

Cory don M. Johnson Co, Bet hp age, N.Y., acct exec 

Biow Co, N.Y., acct exec 

Same, vp 

Opened own firm to service agencies with pub rel counsel, 

N.Y. 
Hal Niemann & Associates, Denver, exec 
Knollin, S.F., acct exec 
Same, merchandise mgr 
Polly ea Inc, Terre Haute, acct exec 






New and Renewed Television (Network and Spot) 



SPONSOR 

American Cigarette & Cigar 

Co Ine 
American Tobacco Co 
Benrue Watch Co 
Borden Co 

Buick Motors I»iv of Gen 

Motors Corp 
Bulova Watch Co 
Cameo Curtains Inc 
Clark Candj * « 
Doublcda) & Co 

Duffy Molt Co Inc 
Electric Autollte 
Eversharp Inr 
Gen Foodfl Corp 

It. I Goodrich & Co 

Gordon H ■' Co 

W. E. Mott Inc 
Pabsl Brewing Co 

IV,.,. -i ola < - 

Peter Paul I DC 

Philip Morris TobaCCO Co 

Pioneer S< lent lime Corp 
Pond'-. Extract * o 

it on -on \ rt Metal Works Inc 
< \ SwanSOn A ^on^. Inc 

United I mil Co 
J. It \\ Uliami 

Zlpp) Product , Inc 



AGENCY 


NET OR STATI 


Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & 


WNBT, N. Y. 


Bayles 




MtllMt 


WNBW, Wash. 


Tarcher 


WNBT, N. Y. 


> oiing «X IIi.Iim.hm 


WBZ-TV, Boston 


Kudner 


WNBT, N. Y. 


Biow 


WNBW, Wash. 


Philbin, Brandon A Sargcant 


WNBT, N. Y. 


BBD&O 


WBZ-TV. Boston 


Huge 


CBS-TV not 


^ oung A Bubicam 


WNBW. Wash. 


Cunningham & Walsh 


CBS-TV net 


Biow 


WNBT, N. Y. 


Young A Kul. i.. n. . 


WNBW, Wash. 


BBD&O 


CBS-TV net 


Aver 


WNBT, N. Y. 


Young A ic ii 1. 1. .mi 


WNBT, N. Y. 


>\ ;ir** i«- k «X Leger 


( IIN-TV net 


Itiow 


WNBT, N. Y. 


Brisaehcr, Wheeler ci Staff 


WNBT. N. Y. 


Biow 


CBS-TV net 


< .iv loll 


WNBT. N. Y. 


J. W. Thompson 


V Mil. N. Y. 


Grey 


WNBW, Wash. 


Copies 


w Mil. N. Y. 


BBD&O 


WNBT. N. Y. 


1 \\ 1 hompson 


W Mil. V > 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



I ii, 



spots; Jan 31; 13 wks (r> 



|.iii ; 



Feb 6; 13 



W BZ-TV, II n 



Film spots; F~eb 4; 8 wks <n> 

Film spots; Feb 1; 35 wks (n) 

Film spots; Jan 5; 52 wks (r) 

Film spots; Feb 1; 9 wks (n) 

Film annrmts; F'eb 1; 52 wks (r) 
Film spots; Feb 12; 13 wks In) 
Film spots; Jan 31; 13 wks (r) 
You Are An Artist; Mon 11-11:15 

wks (n) 
Film spots; Jan 20; 52 wks (n) 
Suspense; Tu 9:3<>-10 pm ; Feb 28; 52 wks lr) 
Film annemts; Jan 30; 52 wks (n) 
Film spots; Jan 1; 17 wks (r) 
Celebrity Time; Su 10-10:30 pm ; Apr 1; (n) 
Hopalong Cassidy; Su 5:30-6 pm ; Jan 29; 52 wks 
Film spots; Feb 2; 52 wks In) 
It. .\ inr. We.l ID- pin: Mareh 1; "» wks ( n ) 
Film spot-; Jan 9; 35 wks Irl 
Film spots ; Feb 3; 26 wks <n) 

Candid Camera: Mon 9-9:30 pm: Mareh 6; 52 wk. Irl 
Mystery Is My Hobby; Fri 11-11 :30 pm; Feb 17 (n) 
Film -pnl-: Jan 9; 211 wk« (n) 
Film .inn. nil-: Jan 3: 2<> wks lr) 
I 1 1 in spots; Jail 18; 13 wk« In) 
Film spots; Feb 8; It wks Inl 

Sm Ii With Acting; Su 6:30-7 pm; Feb 19; 26 wks 

<r) 
Film spots: Jan 3; 52 wks (n) 



<n) 




National Safety Council 

Honors WHO for 
Fourth Consecutive Year! 



WHO' 



s selection for the National Safety 
Council's Public Interest Award marks the 
fourth consecutive year in which this 50,000 
watt Clear Channel Station has been cited 
"for distinguished service" . . . "for excep- 
tional service" to safety on the farm. 

Proud as we are of this Award, we are more 
proud of the people on our staff who helped 
us win it — the script writers, music arrangers 
and producers — the announcers, the guest 
speakers, the civic organizations who co-op- 
erated to make broadcasting realities from 
farm-safety ideas. 

The Award is further proof of WHO's pub- 
lic-spirited programming, its awareness of 



community responsibility, its desire to fur- 
nish "Iowa Plus" listeners with the finest 
radio service in America. For advertisers 
there's an added significance — WHO'S con- 
sistent leadership means greater advertising 
values for any product, in any season, at any 
time of the day or night. 



WHO 

Hh/or Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 



Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyel, Resident Manager 



FREE & PETERS, INC. 
National Representatives 




27 FEBRUARY 1950 



15 



THE 

CLEVELAND 

TELEPULSE 

was published on Febru- 
ary 25, 1950, and will be 
available monthly there- 
after. Each report will 
cover a full week's tele- 
viewing from 12 Noon to 
12 Midnight. Each daily 
V4 hour rating will be 
based on 150 television 
homes (Monday - Friday 
ratings on 750 Homes). 
• 

Other available TelePulse 
material includes monthly re- 
ports in: 

BOSTON 

CHICAGO 

CINCINNATI 

LOS ANGELES 

NEW YORK 

PHILADELPHIA 

WASHINGTON 



The Multi-Market TelePulse 
gives weighted ratings of net- 
work programs in these cities, 
and is also issued monthly. 



For information about these 
and other Teletacts . . . 
Ask The Pulse 



THE PULSE Incorporated 

ONE TEN FULTON STREET 
NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 




Mr. Sponsor 



Oliver Parker McCOmas 

President 
Philip Morris & Co., Ltd., Inc., New York 



Back in L945 sale* were sagging for Philip Morris. The firm's 
gross dropped from $20,925,000 to $11,164,000 between October 
and November. PM's long-faced executives realized they had to take 
serious action to prevent a debacle. I he) wanted a man with a blend 
of administrative skill and Wall Street saw) to help PM's energetic 
president \l L\ on rebuild the organization. Lanky, mild-mannered 
0. Parker McComas got the job. 

For McComas the job was a challenge. He felt that the company's 
ills could he cured 1>\ sound business treatment. \nd he was certain 
he would be happier doctoring a sick compan) than running a 
health) corporation. 

He went to work in October. 1946 as PM's vice-president and 
director. His first job was to reconstruct the sales division which 
had dwindled from 600 salesmen to 00. B\ year's end he had the 
problem licked. His mw s\ stem of recruiting and training sales per- 
sonnel was functioning smoothly and efficiently. To reduce the 200 
pen cut yearh turnover of the sales force he adopted several addi- 
tional employee benefits paid for b\ the company: higher salaries, 
life, retirement and hospital insurance; and longer vacations. Philip 
Morris emplo\ee> responded swifth to the innovations. A short time 
later the New York office reported that more business was being 
handled 1>\ fewer workers. For his part in rebuilding Philip Morris 
he was elected president in April, 1949. 

H\ 1949 the Philip Morris compan) had returned to financial 
health. PM's sales amounted to 9.4 pen cut of all the cigarette busi- 
ness done last year. While unit sales dropped for other leaders. 
I'M sold four and one-half billion more cigarettes in 1010 than in 
1948; 1 1 1 i r~ meant a sales increase of l.~>'._> percent. 

Radio had plaved an important role in the company's convales- 
cence. Of its estimated S8.000.000 1049 ad budget, the firm spent 
roughly S5.000.000 for \M advertising. In 1950 the ratio of expen- 
ditures will be about the same. The company is currently sponsoring 
the following AM shows: This Is Your Life: The Original Youth 
Opportunity Program; Ladies lie Seated; One Mans Opinion; Crime 
Photographer. PM's sole TV program is Candid Camera. 



16 



SPONSOR 



New developments on SPONSOR stories 



p.s 



SeG.' "Soft Drink Leadership" 

Issue! January 1948, p. 27 

Subject: Distribution in 13 areas 



You can buy a Coke anywhere. 

That's even truer today than when sponsor reported 
on the influence of radio on soft drink leadership in its 
January 1948 issue. A recent Scripps-Howard Grocery 
Product Distribution Survey gives a detailed breakdown 
of beverage distribution. 

It shows that in only one of the 13 markets surveyed 
did Coca Cola drop below a 90 percent representation in 
the refrigerators of local outlets. This kind of distribu- 
tion throughout the country justifies network radio (see 
"Spot, Network, or Both?" sponsor, 13 February, p. 
1 7 I : and Coke now sponsors 7he Edgar Bergen Show and 
The Morion Downey Show on NBC. 

Pepsi Cola has 90 percent or higher distribution in 
onlj six of the markets surveyed. Pepsi went into net- 
work radio for the first time in October, 1948, when the 
company started sponsoring Counter-Spy, an ABC mys- 
tery-action thriller. Before this Pepsi had relied niainh 
on spot anouncements including the Pepsi jingle. 

Pepsi distribution is 90 percent or better in Birming- 
ham, Cincinnati. Cleveland. Denver, Indianapolis, and 
Pittsburgh. It's best in Cincinnati with 97 percent, low- 
est in San Francisco, with 79 percent. San Francisco is 
also Coke's low spot among the markets surveyed, but 
its 83 percent was still high for all colas sold in San 
Francisco. Coca Cola had 100 percent coverage in Bir- 



mingham. Cincinnati, Houston, and Knoxville. 

Field work for the Scripps-Howard stud) was com- 
pleted in June 1949. and covered the following cities: 
Birmingham, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Denver, 
El Paso, Fort Worth. Houston. Indianapolis. Know ill-. 
Memphis. Pitt-burgh, and San I rancisco. 

While these markets don't represent national coverage, 
solid distribution in such markets as these does illustrate 
the kind of coverage nece»ar\ to get the most out of 
network radio. No soft drink dominates a major market 
today without using some form of radio. 



p.s 



See: "D-day at the Waldorf" 

IsSUe: 13 February 1950 

Subject: lightning that talks 



lightning THAT talks, the All-Radio Committee's 
film presentation, will have simultaneous local premieres 
on Monda\. (> March, in several sections of the country. 
This is a departure from the original pi in. wherein 
LIGHTNING was to tee off with a world premiere at New 
York's Waldorf-Astoria on 1 March, with local showings 
to follow. The Waldorf event, to be attended by 1.200 
distinguished guests, will be held at a later date which 
had not vet been set at this writing. The film showing in 
the Waldorf's Grand Ballroom will be followed b\ din- 
ner, after which a panel of prominent speakers will assay 
radio's future. 



NEW YORK HAS MORE IRISH THAN DUBLIN 



and WOV has 
a brand new 
radio show for 
everyone who 
loves Irish music 

Write, phone or wire tor details. 

Ralph N. Weil, General Manager 
John E. Pearson Co.. Nat' I Rep. 




my 



NEW YORK 



17 



wPi 




3B* 



*. 



X 



* iK * 



*\ 



V^ 







ELECTRICITY DOES CHORES ON RAPIDLY GROWING NUMBER OF FARMS. MARKET FOR ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES IS HUGE 



The farmer 



wants (o buy 



With 5.270 rural homes electrified daily, 
appliance makers are overdue on radio 



over-all 



The farmer, no stranger to 
[hard work, has long been 
a potential purchaser of labor-saving 
devices. But till recently, two things 
held him hack: lack of ready cash, and 
lack of electricitj . 

Todaj things are different. 

Today farmers arc richer than ever 
before. And with rural electrification 
moving as fast as a prairie fire. Inn- 
ing plans for 1950 arc focused largely 
on electrical appliances and farm ma- 
chinery. Purchasing potential is in 
the billion-dollar class. 

But radio stations are getting onl} 
the humming-] ird's share of the ad- 
vertising dollar. Just whv, will be ex- 
plained later in llii< article. 

In the time it takes you to read two 
paragraphs here, electric service will 





BEFORE: farm housewife bakes with old-fashioned stove. But each day new wires reach 5,270 rural homes creating demand for electric ovens 



be installed for the first time in five percent of all rural non-farm dwellings 

farm and rural non-farm homes. Elec- were wired; 85 percent of all farms 

trification is going on at an average were electrified. 

of 1 1 farms and homes per minute, By 1951, rural electrification will be 

(>(>0 per hour, and 5.270 per day! practically complete, except for about 

Bv tin- end of 1949. an estimated 93 400.000 dwellings so isolated as to be 




BEFORE: heavy fire-heated iron was standard AFTER: but now electric irons can be used 




BEFORE: tub washing was the rule on farms AFTER: farm women buy electric washers 



beyond feasible reach of power lines. 

The U. S. Census of 1940 reported 
that 60 percent of rural families owned 
radio sets; at the end of 1949, the fig- 
ures had risen to 88.6 percent for 
farm families; 94.5 percent for rural 
non-farm families. 

In 1949, assets of farmers rose to 
an unprecedented $122 billions; farm 
debt in relation to value dropped to 
an all-time low. Savings of all kinds 
are about $22 billions; the collective 
farmer carries an estimated $3,000,000 
around in his jeans. 

The farmer is feeding 40 million 
more people than at the end of World 
War I. and 14 million more than in 
1940. The overall population is grow- 
ing faster than ever before in our his- 
tory. So is the farm population, not 
only because of bumper baby crops, 
but because improved methods have 
taken the drudgery out of agriculture, 
and are luring back many boys who 
went to the big city. Too. the aver- 
age American is eating better than 
ever; this factor is equivalent to a 16- 
million population increase. 

U. S. Department of Commerce 
studies reveal lliat farming families 



20 



SPONSOR 




AFTER: same housewife as in picture at left shown with deluxe electric stove. High incomes let farm women buy the best for their kitchens 



generally listen to their radios a great- 
er number of hours than do urban 
dwellers; they are more dependent on 
the medium than are people exposed 
to the greater number of distractions 
of city life. To farm families, radio is 
a welcome friend, the most important 
of all the advertising media. 

It would seem, then, that radio sta- 
tions reaching farm audiences would 
be jam-packed with electrical appli- 
ance and farm machinery advertising; 
that manufacturers, dealers and dis- 
tributors would be jumping feet first 
into one of the hottest markets existing 
today. Such is not the case. It's a 
rich and fertile field, true, but radio 
advertising is working it over with all 
the efficiency of a one-horse plow. 

In the Standard Advertising Regis- 
ter for 1949. there are listed 277 man- 
ufacturers of electric farm equipment: 
electric motors, dairy plant and poul- 
try equipment, heaters, freezers, milk- 
ing machines and similar heavy instal- 
lations. Here is a breakdown of media 
used: farm papers— 219; trade papers 
—190; magazines — 146; daily news- 
papers — 55; business papers — 30; ra- 
dio stations — 26. 

Radio is last on the list. too. of 36 



manufacturers of such electric equip- 
ment as ranges, hot water heaters, wa- 
ter coolers, air conditioning, radio and 
TV sets: trade papers — 27: magazines 
— 25; daily newspapers — 17; farm pa- 
pers — 9; business papers — 9; radio 
stations — 6. 

In the lighting category, including 



40 manufacturers of bulbs, fluorescent 
lighting and small appliances, radio's 
story is a little brighter, but not much: 
trade papers — 39 ; magazines — 23 ; 
business papers — 14; daily newspa- 
pers — 8; radio stations — 6; farm pa- 
pers — 4. 

I Please turn to page 461 




WNAX farm program gives away appliances like these as prizes. Most of the items are electric 



21 FEBRUARY 1950 



21 



1 



M 




How In crack 
a stone wall 



Yalemen Taylor and Reed won 



their letters in the dessert field 



on the first try with radio's help 





I he results wen- somewhat 
less than electrifying, back 
in 1011. when a pair of 
young hopefuls named Malcom Tay- 
lor and Charles M. D. Reed bought 
three weekl) participations on Martin 
Block's Make Believe Ballroom over 
\\ NEW, New York, for their new pud- 
ding. Tumbo. 

Block had alread) made his reputa- 
tion as one of radio- hottest salesmen, 
but ih New York market can't be 
i i a< ' e I like a pigg) bank. And yet, 
Taylor and Read reasoned, if they 
could ^et a New ^ ork toehold for Tum- 
bo the) would have hurdled the tough- 

esl obstacle betwei n them and ih it 
goal of national distribution. Mac Taj - 
lor. energetic president of the Taylor- 
Reed ( <»ij».. personall) led a ll\ ing 
wedge of salesmen around l<>\\n to lin ■ 
up the dealers. I he idea was to gel 
I umbo on the grocers shel\ es in time 
to cash in on the radio | itch. 

It was tough selling. Vfter thi •• 
weeks Taj lor and his - alesmen had 
signed onl) a handful of dealers. The 
average jobber took ih<- view that he 
nei <\r<\ another brand of pudding like 
he needed another thumb. \nd a i( n- 



12 



House radio helped build: Reed, Taylor (above left) put up $500,000 plant 



cant pudding at that — against well-es- 
tablished nickel competition. 

Taylor and Reed saw their slender 
advertising kitty — $5,000 in toto— 
melting away alarmingly, and Tumbo 
hardly a household word. Going into 
a quick huddle with Frank Kent — head 
of their New York agency, Tracy. Kent 
—they decided that the fault lay not 
with radio, or with the station, or with 
the show — but with the market. It was 
crawling with competition, and Tumbo 
was getting lost in heavy traffic. 

The partners and their agency coun- 
selor concluded that a quick hypo was 
needed to keep the campaign alive. 
I he\ came up with an old reliable, a 
premium oiler: one phonograph rec- 
ord in exchange for one Tumbo wrap- 
per. It worked like a shot of adrenalin. 
Block s first announcement of the rec- 
ord offer pulled more than a thousand 
requests, each with a Tumbo wrapper. 

The letters themselves were a revela- 
tion to I a\ lor and Reed. ( )ne lady 
w loir c;o^->l\ that she hid called on 2 I 
grocers before Fnding one who stocked 
Tumbo. Other listen* i- wrote of simi- 
lar frustrations. Taylor and I! - -d wire 
delighted. Not bein ; the i\ pe to be hit 



by falling houses, they went into action 
posthaste. At the time of the Make 
Believe Ballroom record offer not 
more than 1,000 of New ^ oik's 25.000 
grocers had Tumbo on their shelves. 
\\ ithin a few weeks, the figure was 
up to 8.000. and Taylor-Reed's over- 
worked distribution stall was hard put 
to supply all of the grocers who were 
literally besieged b\ hundreds of radio- 
lured customers. 

By that time, thousands of house- 
wives had sampled Tumbo pudding for 
the first time. Taylor and Reed believe 
that, while the record offer undouhted- 
l\ lil the fuse, word-of-mouth recom- 
mendation did much to fan tin 1 blaze 
from that point onward. National dis- 
tribution of Tumbo was achieved with- 
in a lew months of the original broad- 
cast l.\ \\ NEW's Martin Block. 

The Make Believe Ballroom sin i ess 
represented the linn's first radio ven- 
ture in fad their first consumer ad- 
vertising of an\ kind save point-of-sale. 
The Tumbo campaign, aside from its 
direct material returns, pointed a hosl 
id' valuable lessons lor the young part- 
ners which have colored their entire 
business philosophy . 

SPONSOR 



Taylor and Reed admit that they 
were remarkably audacious ai the out- 
set, as a verj young and barel) solvent 
firm, in attempting to crash the formid- 
able New York market with a new food 
product. Hut tins point out that the) 
could not afford to ride with a long- 
term, buildup period, i rhej started 
their business in 1938 with $7,200.) 
They needed quick returns, and the) 
got them — after just a little wobbling 
at the start. 

The Martin Block buy formed a pat- 
tern for radio success which faylor- 

Reed has duplicated main ti s in its 

several years of existence. The nub ol 
it is this: when you've chosen your 
market, latch on to a firmly-established 
"personality" show serving that area. 
and stay with it for at least one or two 
13-week cycles. 

Mac Taylor puts it this way: "Radio 
provides a wonderful opportunity to 
add to your product the prestige and 
additional sell ol an established radio 
personality and program, to help in- 
duce the consumer to buy your prod- 
uct, rather than that of a competitor." 

With the initial Tunibo radio lesson 
pasted firmly in their hats, the partners 
hastened to broaden the base of their 
operations. 1 hey bought participations 
for Tumbo on such solidly accepted 
homemaker shows in the New ^ ork 
market as Adelaide Hawley. Martha 
Deane. and Alma Kitchell. For a fre- 
quency yardstick the) followed the 
three-a-week format they bad used so 
effectheh on Make Believe Ballroom. 
(Please turn to page 52 t 

To Help Your 

;) COCOA MARSH 

Sales Zoom 

Mutual Network - Coast to Coast 

5PM 




BIG NAME RADIO SHOWS 

on the Air every week! 

Nothing is left undone to capture the housewife's interest! The audience reached by these 
NINE BIG RADIO SHOWS means sure-fire increase in sales. They tune in — you cash in! 

Waller Kiernan in 
"Kiernan's Homer" 

Walter Kit-man, author, Itcturer, interna- 
tional traveler, top radio reporter, will ring 
the bell for you >n □ r.jndrr-d ways! 




Smash g triumph H th«.|krwaves — and Taylor-Reed products ride high right 
vith it! BgHBTst in Hollywood works for you, when you lie in with Taylor-Reed! 




Nancy Craig, popular 

"Woman of Tomorrow" 

Radio Show 

Women everywhere follow Nancy Craig's 
advice! Cash in on Nancy's terrific appeal! 




"The Story Teller". . . 

Starring Nelson Olmsted! 

Stories that run the gamu^jroro l; rrmg potrDs to rib-tickling humor, 
with high appeal for otj^md young^Mjk A reot sales builder! 



Herb Sheldon and 
Nlaggi McNellis 

"Luncheon with Maggi and Herb" is 
another top audience participation 
show selling for Toylor-Reecl. Cash in! 




Plus . . . 

Timely Radio Spots 
On Important Stations 
Throughout the Nation! 



TAYLOR-REED QUALITY FOODS 



SOLID DAYTIME PARTICIPATIONS ARE BACKBONE OF TAYLOR-REED RADIO. ONLY NETWORK FLYER WAS HOP HARRIGAN (MBS) 

21 FEBRUARY 1950 23 



\\ t-t'L ilu if n on 


-ft OHM 


» list fit 


in*/, \ew York 


Time 


At- 
home* 


Out-of- 
homs* 


, Out-of- 
home of 
at-home 


1 Total 


9:00 


24.9 
927 400 


2.9 
101,500' 


10.9% 


27.8 
1,028,800 


9:15 


25.5 
875200 


3.2 

104 600 


12.0% 


26.7 
1 979,900 


9:30 


23.3 

867 800 


3.0 

98,300 


11.3% 


26.3 
' 966,100 


9:45 


22.1 
823.100 


2.7 

85,600 


10.4% 


24.8 
908,700 


10:00 


27.8 
1.000 600 


3.4 

116.300 


11.6% 


31.2 

1,1 16 800 


10:15 


30.6 
1,101,300 


3.4 
116,300 


10.6% 


34.0 
U.2I 7.600 


10:30 


28.3 
1,018,600 


3.3 

122,600 


12.0', 


31.6 
1. 141.200 


10:45 


27.8 
1,000,600 


3.2 
119,400 


11.9', 


31.0 
1.120.000 


11:00 


28.4 

1 102,200 


2.9 

101,500 


9.2', 


31.3 
1,203.600 


1 1:15 


27.7 
1,075.000 


2.9 

95.100 


8.8', 


30.6 
1 1 . 1 70. 1 00 


1 1:30 


260 
1 009 000 


2.7 
98,300! 


9.7', 


28.7 
11,107,300 


1 1:45 


26.7 
1 036,200 


2.6 

95,I00| 


9.2% 


29.3 
11,131,300 



12 Noon 



12:15 



12:30 



12:45 



:C0 



1:15 



1:30 



1:45 



2:00 



2:15 



2:30 



2:45 



3:00 



3:15 



3:30 



3:45 



4:00 



4:15 



4:30 
4:45 
5:00 



5:15 



5:30 



5:45 



6:00 



6:15 



6:30 
6:45 



26.4 
,098,900 



3.8 

141,600 



12.9% 



24.6 

024.000 



3.3 
122,600 



12.0'7 



23.7 
986,500 



3.4 

132,100 



13.4', 



22 6 

940 700 



3.4 
135,300 



14.4% 



23.7 

890 100 



3.4 
122,600 



22.1 
830 000 



2.9 
13,100 



13.6^ 



22.4 
841.300 



2.8 

113,100 



13.4% 



21.7 
815000 



2.9 
I 11,000 



13.6% 



22.4 
876,300 



4.4 
163,800 



18.7% 



21.9 

856,800 



4.5 

163,800 



19.1% 



19.9 
778.500 



4.8 
176,500 



22.7', 



18.8 
735 500 1 



4.9 

179,700 



24.4^ 



19.6 
846,500 



4.7 
179,700 



21.2% 



19.7 
850800 



4.4 
173,400 



20.4', 



21.1 
911.300 



4.8 

179,700 



19.7', 



21.3 

919 900 



4.6 

170,200 



18. 5', 



18.7 
760 800 

17.9 
728.300 

16.4 
667 300 

17.4 
707 900 

21.3 
,106,600 



4.2 

160,700 



21.1', 



21.5 
117.000 



22 8 

184,500 

23.1 
200,100 

25.3 
,393,600 

21.8 
,200,800 

25.1 
,382 600 

25.1 
382 600 



4.8 
186,000 

4.1 
154,300 

4.1 
154,300 

3.3 
148,000 

4.0 
173,400 

4.3 
167,000 

3.6 
144,800 

3.6 
151,200 

2.8 
130,000 

2.6 
123,700 

2.7 
116,300 



25.5', 
23.1% 



21.8% 
13.4', 
15.5', 
14.1% 



12.1', 

10.8', 

10.8', 

8.9', 

8.4', 



30.2 
1,240 500 



27.9 
1,146 600 



27.1 
1,118.600 



26.0 
1,076,000 



27.1 
13.8', 1012.700 



25.0 
943.100 



25.2 

954 4C0 



24.6 
926000 



26.8 
.040,200 



26.4 
1,020 600 



24.7 
955000 



23.7 

915200 



24.3 
1,026,200 



24.1 
1.024.200 



25.9 
1.091 000 



25.9 

.090,100 



22.9 
921,500 



22.7 
914,300 

20.5 
821,600 

21.5 
862.300 



24.6 
1.254 600 

25.5 
I 290,300 

27.1 
!, 351 500 

26.7 
1,344,900 

28.9 
1,544,700 

24.6 
1,330,800 

27.7 
1,506.200 

27.8 
1,498.800 



part 3 of a series 



The big plus 

An important factor for .sponsors is being 
measured accurately for the first time 



over-alt 



Jack Benny says he's being 



short changed. 



At a recent meeting of the Radio 
Executives Club in New York he com- 
mented that many of his friends hear 
his program via their car radios; yet 
he doesn't get credit for this listening. 
Turning to C. E. Hooper he asked, 
'"What are vou going to do about 
that?" 

Mr. Hooper hasn't done anything 
yet, but another rating service has. 

Last November in New York Pulse 
made the most complete survey of out- 
of-home listening in radio's history. 
The Pulse survey was the first ever to 
tabulate the combined at-home and 
out-of-home audience. It showed that 
at some hours of the day as much as 
21 percent of the radio audience in 
New York listens away from home. 

And now other surveys have indi- 
cated that this holds approximately 
true in large cities across the country. 

Pulse has completed extensive re- 
search on out-of-home listening in 
Southern California. Boston, and Chi- 
cago. From coast to coast sponsors and 
agene\ personnel are catching glimpses 
for the first time of the /;/// audience 
lhe\ can expect to reach for their radio 
dollars. 

Already sponsors have begun to take 
out-of-home audience figures into ac- 
count when buying time. Last summer 
the makers ol Rialto cigars were inter- 
ested in sponsoring a well-rated sports 
program. I he) had checked the ratings 
ol all such shows in New York and 
found \\ OR s Stan l.omax on par with 
Other similar show-. I • 1 1 1 when \\ ( >lt 
showed the prospective client the re- 
sults ol an out-of-home survey, the sale 
was in the bag. It revealed that Lomax 



had 48.000 daily out-of-home listeners. 

Until recently sponsors were in the 
dark about the size of the out-of-home 
audience. Then I'ulse director Dr. 
Sydney Roslow changed things. In the 
summer and winter of 1949 he proved 
out-of-home listening was not to be 
shrugged olf as negligible. His cur- 
rent studies make it even more definite 
that sponsors must take out-of-home 
dialers into account. (For several 
months prior to initiation of Pulse's 
out-of-home rating >er\ iee in August. 
L949, WNEW had commissioned Ros- 
low T to do experimental out-of-home 
studies.) 

People listen to the radio away from 
home while in cars, at work, while 
visiting, at bars and at restaurants. 
During the warm weather months you 
can spot a portable radio outdoors as 
frequently as a sweater girl. The Pulse 
studies showed that this out-of-home 
listening is a daily habit; and that the 
pattern of listening is similar through- 
out the countrj . 

As advertisers become more con- 
scious of "the big plus," there will be 
a greater demand for out-of-home audi 
ence measurement. Dr. Roslow is cur 
rently processing a recentU complete! 
out-of-home survey made in metropoli 
tan Chicago. This spring he will con 
duct a similar study in Los Angeles 
lie has no definite plans be\ond that 
I [owever, he is confident that in a short 
time advertisers through the count i\ 
will be clamoring for this information 
For. in the future, commercials will be 
geared to include the out-of-home lis- 
tener. \nd when. how. and where lhe\ 
listen will be vital information. 

The November I'ulse surve\ on out- 
of-home listening in New ^ ork i re- 



! 



ferred to above) is the most compre- 
hensive yet completed. For the first 
time the combined number of at-home 
and out-of-home listeners has Inch 
tabulated by 15-minute periods. 

According to the study, more than 
one out of five people listen to the 
radio outside of home every day in 
New York. This is a gigantic extra 
dividend — more than 2,000,000 people. 

"What medium, aside from economi- 
cal radio, could dismiss audiences of 
this magnitude as bonus circulation?*" 
asks NBC's director of research, H. M. 
Beville. He points out that newspapers 
don't discount reading that occurs on 
subways, commuter trains, streetcars, 
and busses; and that the figures pro- 
duced by the Magazine Audience Group 
are greatly increased by surveying 
barber shops, beauty parlors, and other 
public places. 

Because the November study in New 
York points up facts sponsors all over 
the countn should know, this article 
will discuss it in detail. And, to round 
out the picture, facts gathered in No- 
vember will be contrasted with earlier 
Pulse data compiled last August. 

The November report showed that 
out-of-home listening was as high in 
cold weather as in warm though the 
average weekly audience was slightly 
lower in November than in August. 
1949 when Pulse made its first study. 
On Saturdays listening was 23.6 per- 
cent compared to 18.7 percent of the 
total audience in August; Sunday 20.1 
percent against 29.3. 

Apparently men make up the bulk of 
the out-of-home listening audience. A 
special automobile listening study 
made for WOR in May, 1949 revealed 
that they comprise more than 75 per- 
cent of the car listening audience, and 
in both the November and August 
Pulse studies more than one-half of the 
out-of-home audience was male. In 
November male listeners totaled 59.8 
percent; in August 54.3 percent. 

The highest percentage of out-of- 
home listening occurs in the 20-34 age 
bracket. Members of this group spend 
most of their leisure time pursuing 
social activity. Consequently they are 
out of the home frequently. In Novem- 
ber 34.2 percent of out-of-home listen- 
ers were in this age group; in August 
30.2 percent. 

Out-of-home listeners have a high 
potential purchasing power. In the 
(Please turn to page 62 i 

21 FEBRUARY 1950 



This is where New York out-of-home listening took place in 19 19 



November 



Places of out-of-home listening 



Automobiles 
At work 
While visiting 
Restaurants & bars 
Retail establishments 
Clubs and schools 
Outdoors (portables) 
All other places 



No. of listeners 



953,700 

581,000 

557,900 

238,400 

115,700 

71,800 

57,900 

16,200 



Percent of total* 


Percent of total* 


out-of-home 


out-of-home 


listeners 


listeners 


41.2% 


35.4% 


25.1% 


20.8', 


24.1% 


21.3% 


10.3% 


9.4% 


5.0% 


4.9% 


3.1% 


0.5% 


2.5% 


7.5', 


0.7% 


2.2', 



August 



*Adds to over 100 percent because of listening in different places by same listeners. 

Four kinds of out-of-home listening 




Breakdown of 1949 listeners in JMetc York by se.v, age, income 



Percent of total out-of-home 




Percent out-of-home radio listen- 


radio listeners 


Population 
Breakdown 


ers in survey area 










NOVEMBER 


AUGUST 




NOVEMBER 


AUGUST 


26.8% 


28.5% 


SEX Male 


59.8% 


54.3% 


17.1 


20.3 


Female 


40.2 
100.0% 


45.7 
100.0% 


9.8% 


15.5%* 


5-13 years 


5.9% 


5.2%* 


22.0 


28.8 


14-19 years 


8.3 


10.4 


29.2 


26.7 


AGE 2C-34 years 


34.2 


30.2 


33.4 


27.4 


35-44 years 


26.4 


20.5 


17.6 


22.8 


45-64 years 


22.2 


27.2 


8.3 


16.9 


65 & over 


3.1 
100.0% 


6.5 
100.0% 


45.1%** 


** 


$7,600 


6.7% 


5.7% 


43.2** 


** 


FAMILY 4,950 


25.2 


22.8 


47.4** 


** 


INCOME 3,640 


46.1 


41.6 


34.3** 


** 


2,260 


22.0 


29.9 








100.0% 


100.0% 


45.4%** 


** 


TELEPHONE Phone 


65.2% 


62.3% 


38.3** 


** 


OWNERSHIP Non-Phone 


34.8 
100.0% 


37.7 

100.0% 


*ln August, the 


age group was 7- 


13 years. "November figure 


s are percents of hort 


les. 



Comparable percents are not available for August 



25 




KATHI NORRIS (WABD-TV) AND HER HUSBAND, WILBUR STARK, TRY ONE OF SPONSOR'S PRODUCTS AT N. Y. AUCTION ROOM 



lb IT sells women 



Day and night programs 



do offeetive job for a wide range of products 



**x. 



Last year, when television 
was \ oini^r. it was often 
said that the medium had 
a dismal daytime future — husy house- 
wives couldn't -it still long enough In 
focus on the screen. 

I hat ma) be true <>f many, but it's 
untrue of enough to make a consider- 
able impact on the sales curve of da\- 
time advertisers bold enough to gam- 
ble on the unpredictabilit) of a 
woman. 

I lie impacl is being made . . . and 
the .-ales curve is uninistakahlv up. 

ro corral the fa< I-. SPONSOR has just 
completed a stud) of women"- partici- 
pation programs on TV and arrives at 
sucli conclusions a- these : 



Daytime participation programs are 
on the increase throughout the coun- 
try. They are coralling viewer loy- 
alty for stations, impressive sales re- 
Milts for advertisers. An even more 
remarkable fact is the impact of the 
nighttime versions of such shows 
I which have no radio counterpart). 
I hex equal davtime program results, 
are almost equall) interesting to a 
male audience. 

Of I') programs examined. II are 
daytime, six nighttime, while one is 
telecast both daytime and evening. 
Thirty minutes is the average length, 
though three are IS-minute and one 
runs a full two hours. All but one are 
emceed b\ women: four use models 



regularb : nine have guests. 

The shows are of many types in- 
cluding audience participation, cook- 
ing, homemaking. interviewing, gar- 
dening, shopping, and women's maga- 
zines of the air. And the products 
plugged are as diverse as the program 
formats. Two things all have in com- 
mon: 111 thev are handled by person- 
alities with solid backgrounds, either 
in radio, or specialized fields such as 
home economics, fashions, dramatics; 
1 2 1 they rank among the most con- 
\ incing salesmen i pardon, saleswom- 
en i ever to get their foot inside the 
front door. 

For the guidance of advertisers and 
their agencies, sponsor presents the 



26 



SPONSOR 



Typi 


cat women's daytime TV participations 


PROGRAM 


DAY, TIME 
STATION 


TYPICAL RESULTS 


RATES 


Kathi Norris, Your Tele- 
vision Shopper (shop- 
ping) 


M-F, 11-12 noon; 
WABD 


nylon hose: 2,258 pairs @ 78c, 
one announcement; doll sets: 296 
@ $3.00, one announcement; sew- 
ing aid: 300 Jiffy-Stitchers @ 
$2.95, two announcements 


$100 per participation; flat 
rate 


Fifty Club (audience par- 
ticipation ) 


M-F, 12 noon- 1 ; 
WLW-T 


guest tickets: one announcement 
sold out tickets ($1.25) for 1950, 
first half of '51 


$20 for WLW-T; $15 each 
for WLW-T, WLW-C, 26 
times; higher discounts dur- 
ing summer 


Vanity Fair (women's TV 
magazine) 


M-F, 12.30-1; 
CBS-TV 


Norge Cabins: 700 mail inquiries, 
one announcement 


$328 per participation, 26 
times 


Penny Pruden (cooking) 


M-F, 1-2; 

WCPO-TV 


sandwich grill: single showing ex- 
hausted store's stock 


$20 per participation; flat 
rate 


Magic Tele Kitchen (cook- 
ing) 


M-F, 1-2; 
WLW-T 


canned food: viewers buy $2,393 
worth more than non-viewers 


$20 per participation; flat 
rate 


Market Melodies (wom- 
en's TV magazine) 


W-Sa, 2-4; 
WJZ-TV 


reconditioned vacuum cleaner: 284 
@ $15, one announcement 


$114 per participation, 26 
times 


Kitty Dierken Shops for 
You (shopping) 


M-F, 2.30-3; 
WAAM-TV 


various items: phone calls average 
900 per week; sales, $400 


$60.80 per participation in 
ooth daytime and nighttime 
programs, 26 times 


What's New in the Home 
( homemaking ) 


M-F, 3.45-4.15; 
WTMJ-TV 


furniture store: one free offer of 
broom exhausted supply of 2,300 


$55 per participation; flat 
rate 


A la Mode (interviews) 


W, 5-5.30; 

WDSU-TV 


soft drink: 3,000 requests for Roy- 
al Crown Cola prize, three an- 
nouncements 


$30 per participation; flat 
rate 


A Dish a Day (cooking) 


Tu, Th, 5.30-6; 
WDSU-TV 


foods, appliances: advertisers' de- 
mand doubled program schedule 


$30 per participation; flat 
rate 


Typical women's niyhttime TV participations 


Kitty Dierken Shops for 
You (shopping) 


M-F, 6.30-7; 
WAAM-TV 


see results for this program listed 
under daytime 


see daytime listing 


Hi Lights (interviews) 


Tu, 6.45-7.15; 

WICU-TV 


dresses: Darne's seasonal sales in- 
creased by more than one half 


$37.60 per participation, 26 
times 


KPIX Teleshopper (shop- 
ping) 


F, 7.15-7.45; 

KPIX-TV 


refrigerator dishes: 50,000 Fresh- 
erators, four announcements 


$37.50 per participation; 
flat rate 


The Floral Trail 
(gardening) 


M, 7.30-7.45; 
WDSU-TV 


magazine: 20-25 subscriptions per 
week 


$30 per participation; flat 
rate 


The Model Speaks 
(fashions) 


M, 7.40-8; 
WFIL-TV 


furs: mink coat @ $3,200 from 
single showing 


$60.80 per participation, 26 
times 


day, 1 to 2 p.m., WC] 
nati. Ohio. 

With 15 years in ra 
telling listeners how to 
home, Penny sailed int 
dium full tilt. Tossin< 


D 0-TV, Cincin- 

dio behind her 
make a house a 
o the new me- 
>; comments on 


homemaking in with her cooking in- 
gredients, she comes up with a meal a 
day and plenty of sensible hints. 

The show, which went on with the 
opening of the station in Julv. 1949, 
[Please turn to page 54) 



following program by program break- 
down of format and results covering 
19 women's TV shows across the coun- 
try. It is prohahh the most complete 
survey of its kind published to date. 



DAYTIME PARTICIPATION 
PROGRAMS 

AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION 
The Fifty Club. Mondaj through Fri- 
day, 12 noon to 1 p.m., WLW-T, Cin- 
cinnati (point of originationi. WLW- 
C, Columbus, and WLW-D, Dayton, 
Ohio. 

Ruth Lyons, radio writer, director- 
producer, who joined WI.W in 19-12. 
handles this one — the only one of its 
kind to turn up in sponsor's roundup. 
Miss Lyons lunches dailj with ."ill 
women, who later join her in the stu- 
dio for interviews, contests, games, 
group singing, and stunts. 

Tab for the meal and video debut is 
$1.25. Last June, a single announce- 
ment sold out all tickets for 1950, and 
the first half of '51. Prizes are given 
for letters about the show; letters av- 
eraged 1.500 per week. 

COOKING 

Magic Tele Kitchen, Monday through 
Friday, 1 to 2 p.m.. WLW-t, Cincin- 
nati ( point of origination ) , WLW-C. 
Columbus, WLW-D, Dayton, Ohio. 

Products of six regional sponsors go 
into the meals prepared by home econ- 
omist Catherine Beck, assisted by Pa- 
tricia Tess. Lucky guy who gets to 
eat them is announcer Bob Merryman. 

A recent survey by Crosley Broad- 
casting's research department for a 
canned goods participant revealed that 
viewers bought $2,383 worth more of 
the product than non-viewers; the 
sponsor was getting back $22 in addi- 
tional sales for every dollar spent. 
Penny Pruden, Monday through Fri- 

Camera moves in for Del Monte commercial on the Peggy Towne Show Ruth Crane (not participating) pioneered phone shopping in capital 










<M 



| 



> - 




for sponsors 

Throe lop questions on how to 

use the new radio measurement 



f Despite the fact that most subscribers 

^""■■" hadn't received their printed report a- 
this was written, it i- already apparent that BMB 
study number two will do much more than the first 
one to help advertisers buy more for their money. 
Kr\ in this is the new breakdown of listening into 
3-5 and 0-7 times per week in addition to the one or 
more reported in the pre\ ious study. 

This finer definition of coverage has numerous 
applications. Man) of them are not yet apparent. 
Vmong those which have been discussed already are 
the three presented here. These questions are really 
posers because until stations, agencies, and adver- 
tisers have a chance to use the BMB figures nobody 
can give any definite answers. 

The questions are discussed here to emphasize 
their relation to the outstanding new feature of this 
BMB report, and to indicate brief!) some possible 
applications. Oilier problems which the new listing 
breakdown will help solve, for example, are the re- 
lation between BMB figures and other radio rating 
figure-: relation between BMB figures and the vari- 
ous networks: to station power, to different days. etc. 

The question of BMB area report- won't be up 
lui final discussion until the Board of Directors 
meets in March or April. Some agencies used the 
L946 area reports almost exclusively, others used 
them little. This time there are more than twice the 
numbei oJ stations, onl) aboul \ j'.\ are subscribers. 
Ii would, <>l course, mean making non-subscription 
data public. The cost would probably come to more 
than $2,000 per lunik. It alreadj grows late to starl 
sinh ,i production, so its chances don't look good. 



|l II I I I |M I |IM |l I I | 




1 



i tin buyers use B)1B to compare radio 
costs with other media? 



Yes. The total weekly circulation of a station or net- 
work ma) be compared with the ABC net-paid circulation 
of magazines and newspapers. ABC figures tell how many 
people buy (use) the magazine. BMB figures tell how 
many families use a station. Neither measurement tells 
bow much time is given to reading or listening. But where 
magazine and newspaper readership studies are used to 
supplement circulation figures for printed media, program 
ratings supplement data BMB data for radio. The new 
BMB listening breakdown makes still finer comparisons 
possible. 

It is a fact that throughout the country leading stations 
in any market consistently show an advantage over printed 
media in cost per thousand. One factor is the "use" of the 
station I or network) as compared to printed media. For 
example, note the total weekly nighttime audiences of the 
following stations in their home counties as compared with 
the ABC circulation of Life and the Saturday Evening 
Post in the same counties. Radio audiences are given in 
round thousands. 



Boston 
WBZ 215.000 Life 53,626 

\\ EE1 2 12.000 SEP 39,162 
\\Y\C 174.000 



Minneapolis 
WCCO 188.000 I.itr 28.093 
\\T<:\ 111.000 SKI' 25.383 
"A" 178.000 



Chicago 
Wlil'.M 1.118.000 Life 114.898 
WMAQ I.U7.(i()0 SEP 133.038 
\\(.\ 1,055,000 
\\ I - 981,000 

In the five I ion mil: lis of \cu ^ ork ( at\ . \\ OK ha> a total 
weekl) audience of 2,949,640. Life's ABC circulation in 
the five boroughs is 300,445; SEP's, 203,903. The Life 

figures arc based on a one-da\ check in November, 1946. 
and the) have inn rased about two percent since then. 
SEP figures were checked in March. 1948, and have since 
increased aboul ten percent. 

But the mosl important thing an advertiser buys is 
impressions not just advertising. From this standpoint 
the lads look bad for printed media. The) discovered two 
I" i< i in readership of a 7()-line newspaper ad; fi\ «• percent 
readership of a lull page black and while advertisement in 
Life. ITiat stor) is s<> thin compared lo die counted audi- 
ences exposed to radio advertising that ii has ne\er been 
told i" thousands <d advertisers, large and small. The 
i Please turn to page 60 1 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I 



I I 





2 



How ii ill If »IJ» help pattern stations 
for spot campaigns? 



3 



Should the If ?! If Count if base be 
50%? 



In areas where coincidental, diary, meter or other au- 
dience information isn't available. BMI? coverage data is 
virtualh the only source of detailed information that will 
tell an advertiser whether he's buying a "'rich " or a "poor" 
weekly audience to which to project his message. The addi- 
tion of 3-5 and 6-7 times-per-week listening breakdowns 
in the new studv will provide an invaluable tool for ob- 
taining optimum coverage patterns /// tun urea. 

One problem always has been that of matching coverage 
with distribution. The first BMB report gave sponsors a 
tool for this purpose. It was admittedlv crude, but it was 
better than anything they had until then. The new report, 
while nobody's dream of perfection, is a realistic step to- 
ward enabling advertisers to buv more clearly defined cov- 
erage than ever before. 

A part of the job of matching coverage and distribution 
has always included finding and plugging holes in coverage 
that didn't show up in the study of audience data available 
for the area under consideration. Most advertisers have 
probabl) had the experience of having dealers in some area 
to which distribution has just been expanded complain thc\ 
needed more radio support. 

The advertiser, with announcements or programs on a 
-tat ion whose signal came into the new market area quite 
adequately, may have had no way of knowing, without 
BMB. that strong loyalty to another station was responsible 
for the hole in his own station's coverage. The new break- 
downs will help him avoid to a still greater degree these 
holes that fail to coincide with his distribution. 

The new study offers not so much basic new uses as it 
does opportunities to use old applications more effectively. 
In connection with making distribution and coverage co- 
incide closeK are special product problems. For example, 
wine sales have their own pattern. There are wet and drj 
states: local option: large cities where sales are good: rural 
areas, that aren't worth covering. The finer listening break- 
down enables an advertiser to select his stations county b\ 
count) for the most profitable coverage pattern, where, in 
this case, a high power station might be wasteful. 

The coverage of higher power stations outside their pri- 
marv areas has proved highly profitable to certain kinds 
of advertisers. Just how far does a densitv of listening ex- 
tend that makes further distribution or more merchandising 
profitable'.'' The new stud\ can help make the decision. 
I Please turn to page 60 I 



The new times-per-week breakdown ol Listening puts 
a new face on the "audience level" concept. The "level 
that buyers of broadcast advertising have used most often 
since the first BMB study as a basis for accepting or re- 
jecting radio coverage is a total weekh audience of .">() per- 
cent of the radio families in a given county, or area. 

But the 1946 BMB figures didn t -a\ how often, beyond 
1-2 times weekly, a family tuned an) station. The 1949 
report tells the user what percentage of radio families 
tunes a station or group of stations 3-5 and 6-7 times 
a week in addition to the old figure of 1-2 times a week. 
Still, this analysis of the weekly audience of a station or 
network doesn't so much affect the question of buying radio 
coverage on one or another arbitrary level. What it does 
affect is the flexibility with which a buyer uses the "levels" 
concept in buying coverage. 

Knowing what percent of radio families dials a station 
1-2; 3-5; and 6-7 times a week throws an entirel) new 
light on the otherwise enigmatic total audience figure. 
Suppose two rival stations each have a weekl) audience of 
60 per cent of the radio families in their primary coverage 
areas. It would make a big difference to the advertiser 
whether he were buying coverage divided 20-20-20 among 
1-2: 3-5; 6-7 times-per-week listeners, or divided, sav 20 
per cent who tuned as many as three times or oftener each 
week, and 40 per cent who listened six or oftener times 
each week. Base for all these figures is total radio families. 

Some stations with 40 per cent coverage levels composed 
of a majority of dialers in the 3-7 category could be betlei 
buys than stations with 50 per cent coverage levels com- 
posed mainly of 1-2 times per week dialers. According to 
the new report, roughh 15 per cent of all radio stations 
can't c ] aim "prinnm coverage" on a 50 per cent basis. 
\bout eight per cent -how primal \ coverage of their own 
city. These are other examples of instances in which the 
three-wax listening breakdown will affect the audience 
levels concept in buying radio. 

Specifically, whether 50 per cent is the besl breaking- 
point is a question with main ramifications. Some research 
has been ('one to indicate this is too low in main cases, and 
SPONSOR will explore this question in a future article. It is 
obvious, however, thai the type ol product, kind ol pro- 
gram, location of the market, radio competition, etc., ma) 
drasticall) influence the situation. I nder some conditions 
(Please turn to page 60) 



I I I II I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 




Riders board bus for trip home. Average riding time known Inside, sound from staggered speakers is only few feet from any passenger 

Ipana was the product. 
- - - i ll- share ol total dentil i ice 
sales in the test market shot up 47 per- 
cent in 10 weeks. 

For an old. established brand, a 
brand already heavily promoted na- 
tionally, that seemed phenomenal. 
Evansville. Indiana, was the scene of 
the test. 

The medium was "transit radio. ' 

"Transit radio.*" or "bus radio," as 
it is called in some localities, means 
much more than an installation of FM 
receivers in buses and trollevs. It is 
a special system of broadcasting with 
programs and commercials evolved 
specificallv for transit riders. 

It is definitely emersins from the 
test stase in many of the 19 cities 
where facilities are now available. Ad- 
vertisers report instances of immediate 
sales impact in the best tradition of 
broadcast advertising. 

Transit radio offers advertisers some 
unique features. If it did not. it might 
not have much of a claim upon their 
budgets as an added broadcast service. 

Bristol-Myers, one of the oldest and 
biggest users of radio and television, 
and their agency, Doherty, Clifford, 
and Shenfield. decided to test the ef- 
fectiveness of radio programed For bus 
and trollcv riders. Thev chose Ipana. 
That made the test a hard assignment, 
because Ipana alread\ ranked among 
the top three in sales volume. 

Evansville was selected for the test 
because the market is small enough to 
allow detailed checking of results. It 



Markets on I lie move 

Transit radio, currently in 19 areas, 
piles up exceptional results 

Transit rudio is 19-marhet* Medium 





VEHICLES EQUIPPED 


TOTAL TO BE 


CITY 


As of Jan. 1 5 


INSTALLED 


Allentown, Pa. 


68 


98 


Baltimore, Md. 


60 


600 


Cincinnati, Ohio-Covington, Ky. 


475 


500 


Des Moines, la. 


50 


200 


Evansville, Ind. 


100 


100 


Flint, Mich. 


90 


90 


Houston, Tex. 


250 


400 


Huntington, W. Va. 


35 


80 


Kansas City, Mo. 


30 


800 


Omaha, Nebr. 


20 


235 


Pittsburgh, Pa. ;burban lines] 


150 


150 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


200 


200 


St. Louis, Mo. 


1,000 


1,000 


Tacoma, Wash. 


131 


131 


Topeka, Kans. 


53 


53 


Washington, D. C. 


225 


1,500 


Bradbury Heights, Md. 


35 


35 


Wilkcs-Barrc, Pa. 


100 


100 


Worcester, Mass. 


225 


225 



SPONSOR 




Transit Facts 

ii0 4 % t of all adults (15 or over) are regular transit riders 

ftfi *%) of all adults make 5 or more round trips weekly 

Td f %f of a" men are regular transit riders 

Ht% of all women are regular transit riders 

7f»% of these women riders are housewives 

75% of the national buying income is spent by 61 % of the 
population who live in the 255 urban marketing areas 
— none of which has less than 25.000 population 



*Continuinq Transit Advertising Studies — including 10 passenger sur- 
veys in cities ranging -from 214,000 to 3,640,000 population. 



Many stops are located in shopping centers. Radio gives buying hints 



would not be strongly affected by other 
Ipana promotions. 

In each city where the transit com- 
pany has a tie-in with a local FM sta- 
tion for equiping their buses and trol- 
leys to receive programs, the station 
itself is solely responsible for the pro- 
graming, for commercial standards, 
etc. Each station handles its own local 
sales. 

The 19 stations now operating tran- 
sit radio facilities, however, are all 
represented for national advertising by- 
Transit Radio. Inc., the same organi- 
zation from which thev obtain the 
highly specialized equipment necessary 
for the operation. 

In Evansville, the Transit Radio sta- 
tion is WMML. Bristol-Myers started 
last October with fifteen 25-sec<m<l 
transcribed announcements per week 
for Ipana. This was the only local pro- 
motion used for the product. 

WMML. in order to measure results 
more accurately, conducted bi-weekly 
sales audits of Ipana and competing 
brand sales in a panel of 15 drug 
stores properly cross-sectioned by size 
and location. Audits were made dur- 
ing September, for the base of com- 
parison. 

At the end of the tenth week the 
score for the four leading brands in 
terms of increase or decrease in dol- 
lar sales looked like this: 

Ipana up l(>' , 

Pepsodent down 20' < 
Colgate down 10% 

Amm-i-dent down 36^5 



In terms of increase or decrease of 
each brand's share of to'.al dollar sales, 
score at the end of the tenth week was: 
Ipana up 47% 

Pepsodent up 5% 

Colgate down 10% 

Amm-i-dent down 20' < 

As a result of this showing, Bristol- 
Myers went into another market early 
in December for further tests which 
are still to be reported. 

Miles Laboratories gave bus music 
and news perhaps the toughest product 
on its rosier to test — Nervine. Cin- 
cinnati, where Nervin? was a neshsri- 
ble factor in the field of first aid for 
jittery nerves, was the mark, 1 . 

Setting the stage, a pre-advertis'ng 
store audit of Nervine sales was taken 
over a four-week period, 5 June to 2 
July, 1949. This was done through 
the' WCTS-FM Drug Store Panel con- 
sisting of 24 cross-section drug out- 
lets in Cincinnati. The unit sales of 
Nervin? for these four weeks served as 
the base for comparison with unit sales 
during the period of transit radio ad- 
vertising. The first cycle ran from 5 
July to 19 October, with 17 announce- 
ments per week. 

Using 100 as the base index repre- 
senting pre-transit radio average week- 
ly sales, results for a six and a 12- 
\wvk test period were as follows: 

\\,-i ■■.,,,. 
Sales Index Weekly 
( 100 base I Increase 
Vverage wei U\ >ales 

in 6-week te I 175.7] 7.~>.51% 

Vverage weekl> -air- 
in 12-week tesl -21. i 124.3% 



Miles renewed the WCTS-FM sched- 
ule and placed a 26-week contract with 
KXOX-FM in St. Louis, also calling 
lor 17 announcements per week. (Ad- 
ditional experiences will be aired in 
I his report I . 

Programing for bus riders owes its 

{Please I urn to page 60 1 




Movie-bojnd, but sponsor still gets in a word 



*2c* iMt a r f* j?' &* &* 

* it v1- f' It iftlr?' 




Transit music, news is heard at home as w 



21 FEBRUARY 1950 



31 




This is (IMS... the Columbia Broadcasting System 

. . . where night after night the greatest stars in radio 



deliver to advertisers the largest audiences 



at the lowest cost of 'any major advertising media in. 








1. The Edgar Bergen-Chorlie McCarthy Show 

2. Inner Sanctum 
3Beulah (Haltie McDanie!) 



4. Lux Radio Theatre (William Keighley) 
5. My Friend Irma (Marie Wilson) 
6. The Bing Crosby Show 

7. You Bel Your Life (Groucho Marx) 

8. Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons (B.Kilpack) 

9. Jock Benny (Mory Livingstone, Rochester) 
10. Mystery Theatre (Alfred Shirley) 

I I. The Burns and Allen Show 

12. Lowell Thomas 

1 3. Edward R. Mur row with the News 
U.Eric Sevareid ond the News 

1 5. Meet Corliss Archer (Janet Waldo) 

1 6. Amos V Andy 

I /.Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts 



18. Carnation Contented Hour (Ted Dole) 
1 9. Suspense 

20. The Bob Hawk Show 

2 1. Dr. Christian (Jeon Hersholl) 

22.Mr. S Mrs. North (Alice Frost, J. Curlin) 

23. The Goldbergs (Gertrude Berg) 

24. The Jack Smith-Dinah Shore-Margoret 
Whiting Show 

25. Hallmark Playhouse (Jomes Hilton) 
26. Crime Photographer (Staats Cotsworth) 
27.My Favorite Husband (Lucille Ball) 
28.Skippy Hollywood Theater 

29. Leave It To Joan (Joan Davis) 

30. Our Miss Brooks (Eve Arden) 



3 1. Dick Haymes' Club IS starring 
Andrews Sisters, Evelyn Knight 
32.Gongbuslers 

33. The Vaughn Monroe Show 

34. Family Hour of Stars (Kirk Douglos, 
JaneWymon, Dano Andrews, 
Loretto Young, Irene Dunne) 

35. The Gene Autry Show 

36. Mr. Chameleon (Karl Swenson) 

37. F.B.I, in Peace and War (M. Blaine) 
38. The Horace Heidt Show 

39. Sing It Again (Don Seymour) 
40. Life With Luigi (J. Carrol Naish) 
41. The Red Skellon Show 




TV dictionary for sponsors 



TV director Herbert True compiles video definitions 



"Cet tin- juicer to kill the flood, and then 
freeze it. \n innocent advertiser who hap- 
pened to walk into a video studio on those 
words might deduce that he had blundered into the play- 
room ol an asylum for tin- mechanically-minded. But the 
ton-sighted fellow who had honed up on the definitions in 
siminsohs "T\ Dictionary" would neither falter nor 
blanch. He would mereh sav to himself: "It's elementary. 



really. The television director wants the electrician to 
turn out the kleig light, after which the scene is to be 
executed as planned." 

Below sponsor presents the second in a series of three 
installments of a TV lexicon compiled by Herbert True. 
radio and television director of the Carter Advertising 
Agency. Inc., Kansas City. Advertisers and agency men 
alike will find it invaluable. 



E 

EDITING The final arranging, shortening and eliminating of scenes 

in a film and synchronizing them with the sound track. 

EFFECTS Tricks or techniques used in changing film scenes, usu- 
ally with the use of special cards, plates, etc., on a film negative. 

ELECTRON BEAM A stream of electrons focused in the shape of 

a beam by external electrostatic or magnetic fields. Also known 
as the cathode-ray beam. 

ELECTRON GUN A system of metallic cylinders arranged in the 

narrow ends of both the camera and receiving tubes, in which 
is formed the electron beam which is ultimately used for scan- 
ning the image before the TV camera and for reproducing it in 
the TV receiver. 

EXPANDING SQUARE Film effect wherein an image becomes 

visible as it replaces previous picture from small expanding 
square out. 



FADE IN The TV screen is dark and the picture gradually appears 

to full brightness. 

FADE OUT From full brightness a picture disappears gradually 

until the screen is dark. 

FADER or POT Instrument used to lower or raise sound level. 

FAKING Arrangement of articles or material in an unnatural man- 
ner that when photographed passes as authentic. 

FALSE CEILING — Term used to describe devices such as partial 
ceilings, etc., which are used to create the effect of a room 
completely enclosed from above without affecting an actual 
covering which would prevent effective overhead lighting. 

FIELD PICKUP — The transmission of out-of-studio events by a mo- 
bile unit, and cameras. 

FILM PICKUP — The electronic transmission of motion pictures 
from 16 or 35 mm. films by means of television. 

FILM STRIP — A sequence of several 35 mm. frames shown indi- 
vidually. Also called slides. 

FILTERS TV lens filters used to eliminate or reduce glare, or a 

portion of light spectrum. 



FIXED INSTALLATION Permanent set such as kitchen, news- 
room, etc. 

FLAG Large sheet used to shade light from cameras. 

FLASH An extremely short scene. 

FLASH BACK or CUTBACK To return to a previously shown 

action. 

FLAT Lack of contrast in screen image. 

FLOOD Single kleig light or scoop used to illuminate wide areas. 

FLOOR PLAN Scaled print or plan of studio or stage upon which 

are marked the location of walls, settings, doorways, sound 
effects, working areas, etc. This floor plan is a prerequisite to 
all developments and is used by the producer-director to plot 
action and business prior to rehearsals in the actual setting. 

FOLLOW FOCUS To change the focus of the camera while it is 

on the air, in order to produce a constantly sharp image of an 
object that is moving toward or away from the camera. This 
technique is nearly always used with a Zoomar lens, especially 
in picking up sporting events. 

FRAME A single complete picture containing the American stand- 
ard of 525 lines. 

FRAME FREQUENCY The number of times per second the com- 
plete frame is scanned. 

FREE HEAD A TV camera tripod or mount that swings freely in 

all directions. 

FREE PERSPECTIVE — The deliberate falsification of normal per- 
spective in the painting and or construction of TV settings with 
the intention of achieving a seemingly greater depth or dis- 
tance. 

FREEZE IT — Terms used to indicate that arrangements, designs 
and set or other production facilities are approved and should 
be executed as planned. 

FULL SHOT A distant view which should include full length view 

of actors or talent. 

F.U.O.P. Fix up on printer. Have trick man get effect of siie or 

animation by optical printing or illusion. 

FOCUSING CONTROL Adjustment on receiver and monitor used 

for bringing the picture into sharper definition. 



34 



SPONSOR 



GHOST An undesirable image which appears in your television 

picture, which is usually a result of a reflection or several re- 
flections of the transmitted signal. 

GIZMO — Generic term. In TV something for which a more techni- 
cal definition is lacking or else has been forgotten altogether 
by the speaker. 

GIVE Order to actors to become more a part of their character 

and to get into their parts and act more convincingly. 

GROUND GLASS The glass in the TV camera viewing system on 

which the picture is projected for viewing by cameraman. 

GROUND ROW Any natural materials placed in front of fake 

backgrounds to make a scene more real. 



HALATION A blurred or halo effect that sometimes occurs sur- 
rounding bright or shining objects. 

HAND PROPS Movable materials of all kinds which are used by 

actors in their respective roles, or other small items used to 
dress a set. 

HEAD ROOM Area between the actor's head and the actual top 

of set. This area is important in relation to the amount of up- 
ward camera movement possible without overshooting sets. 

HOT Too much light on talent, set, etc. 

HOT LIGHT — Also pinpoint spot. A concentrated beam of light 
used in emphasizing features, profiles or contours. 



ICONOSCOPE — The earlier camera pickup tube used in the RCA 
TV system. 

IMAGE — The photographic likeness as recorded on TV tube. 

IMAGE-ORTHICON The current super-sensitive camera tube 

developed by RCA which is capable of picking up scenes in 
semi-darkness or without excessive lighting. 

INKY Usually pertains to any incandescent lamp. 

INSERT Any explanatory item, usually a CU, and written, such as 

a letter, sign, trade mark or label. 

INTERFERENCE Disturbance of TV reception caused by undesir- 
able signals such as airplanes, automobiles, FM radio station, 
and hams. 

INTERLACING Technique in which each picture in two sets of 

alternating lines is synchronized and flicker is eliminated. 

IN THE CAN Completed TV film, program or commercials that 

have been checked, found O.K. and are in metal containers 
ready for shipping. 




1 Fixed installation 2 Full shot 3 Give 

4 Handprop 5 Image 6 Live talent 7 MCU 



IRIS IN Also circle in. The gradual appearance of a picture from 

a small spot until it fills the picture through constantly enlarg- 
ing circle. 

IRIS OUT — Reverse action of the above in which the circle closes 
down until it disappears. 

J 

JUICER An electrician. 

JIC — Just in case. 

K 

KEY NUMBERS Footage numbers marked along edge of film at 

intervals. 

KEY LIGHTS Sufficient illumination. 

KINESCOPE — The tube currently used in receivers or monitors on 
which the television picture is reproduced. Trade name as de- 
veloped by RCA. 

KINESCOPE FILM Technique developed by RCA to record on 

film complete TV programs. Costs for 30-minute kinescope film 
usually around $500 for first, and about $25 for each addi- 
tional print. 

KILL To strike out or remove. 

KLEIG LIGHTS or SCOOPS A patented type of lights, famous 

because of their long use on the stage, now used in TV. 



LAP D SSOLVE Cross fading of one scene or image over another. 

Momentarily both pictures are visible. One picture disappears 
as another picture appears. 

LEADER Term used to describe special portion of film commer- 
cial which is used at beginning of library or stock film. 

LENS TURRET — A plate on TV camera on which are fastened 
several lenses (wide angle, narrow angle, telescopic, etc.), and 
which can be rotated to facilitate rapid interchanging. 

LIP SYNC or LIP SYNCHRONIZATION— Direct recording of 
sound from scene that is being photographed. This term usually 
pertains to film commercials where you can see actors and 
their lips moving. 

LIVE TALENT TV broadcast as it originates with live subjects 

or animation. 

LIVE TITLES Titling material which is televised directly in the 

studio rather than supplied from slides, or film. 

LOCAL Restricted to local TV station as opposed to network or 

kinescope film. 

LOCATION Any location outside of TV studio where you are tele- 
vising. 

LOSf THE LIGHT — Term used In directing cameraman as "move 
to next position when you lose the light." 

L.S. Long shot. A full view of set or background usually including 

full length view of actor or actors. 

M 

MAGNISCALE An object produced in larger than actual size in 

order to make clear details that would otherwise be ineffective 
or indistinguishable on TV. 

MAKE UP — Facial makeup, etc., on talent. 

MASKING PIECE or WALL Section arbitrarily used to provide 

a backing for sharp or definite changes in camera angles. 

MCU Medium close-up. A shot that cuts off actors or talent just 

above the knees. 

MINIATURE Any small model of houses, cities, automobiles, etc. 

MIST SHOT A TV shot or still photo that is taken through gauze 

or with lens out of focus to achieve soft or blurred effect. 

(to be eontinuetl in next issue) 



27 FEBRUARY 1950 



35 




\ 



*S**« 



I i 



We knoxo the conse- 
quences and - sob - 
we'll face the music. 
ft was us. We done it. 
We dropped the 

H* BOMB 

m Miami! 

As if this market 
weren't radio active 
enough, too. And us 
having our biggest 
year! 

Well, it's "H oui 
chest. It's going to 
t liange a generation 

of time-buying habits 

but we just couldn't 

keep it in any longer. 



SI A\DS FOR 



1! 



I 



WGBS IS FIRST 

again. (Nov.-Dec. 1949) 

FIRST... 

by 23.6% ahead of 
Station B. 25.7% 
ahead of Station C. 
336.0% ahead of 
Station D. 

WGBS IS FIRST 

all morning, all after- 
noon, all evening long. 

FLASH... Advance 
report on BMB. 
BMB Study No. 2 
Reveals WGBS has 
INCREASED AUDIENCE 
BY 68% DAYTIME . . . 
85% NIGHTTIME 
Now — more BMB 
Audience than ever 
before — highest 
Hoopers in Greater 
Miami ... THE NEW 
1950 WGBS ... at the 
old 1947 rates. 



50.000 WATTS 




BS AFFILIATE 

MIAMI. FLORIDA 



RTS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS... 



-continued from page 2- 

Radio and TV 
contribute to democracy 

Public service awards by National Conference of 
Christians and Jews went to WMAQ, Chicago; WBAL and 
WBAL-TV, Baltimore; NBC and CBS. This marks first 
award to a TV station. 

NBC now 
covers Alaska 

10,000 watt KFAR, Fairbanks and 5,000 watt KENI, 
Anchorage, together with six affiliates of the 
Alaskan Broadcasting System, have become NBC sta- 
tions on a unique basis. Most programs will be 
recorded in Seattle on tape and air expressed to 
Alaskan stations. Unusual interest programs will 
be transmitted via shortwave through facilities of 
Alaska Communications System. KFAR and KENI will 
reciprocate with special programs on same basis. 
Fabulous Captain Austin E. Lathrop owns KFAR and 
KENI. 

Transit Radio 
finds another foe 

Newest threat to Transit Radio of Washington, D. C. 
is bill before the District House Committee. Aimed 
at stifling commercially-sponsored transit radio, 
action could set precedent for local legislatures. 
Measure imposes fine of $1,000 per day for broad- 
casts on street cars or buses. Considerable doubt 
exists as to chances for enactment. 

KXOK to give 

expanded transit-radio service 

KX0K-FM, only commercial station in St. Louis broad- 
casting completely independent FM service, received 
formal FCC approval of expansion plans 10 February. 
Commission okayed sale, by KWK, of a 574-foot tower, 
transmitter, and equipment. Expansion will enable 
KX0K-FM to produce radiated power of 70,000 watts in 
a 17,500 square mile area. 

1949 third best 
year for earnings 

Estimated 1949 corporate earnings during 1949 were 
off 21 percent, after taxes, from 1948 figures, but 
total added up to third best year in our history. 
Despite drop, business was still generally encour- 
aging, though spotty throughout the nation, and 
earnings were about twice those of 1929, the most 
profitable pre-war period. Spottiness is attributed 
to high labor costs, strikes, price-cutting and 
advertising intensification to meet increased com- 
petition. 



36 



SPONSOR 



«"&/ 



QUIET, CHILDREN 



Tn 9 y 



~^ 




V 



\« 







In Detroit, WWJ is more than a great radio station . . . 
more than a source of entertainment for the nearly one million 
homes in the Detroit area. WWJ, Detroit's FIRST station, has 
consistently been the leader in community service and enterprise. 

Its acceptance by advertisers is indicative of the faith 
Detroit has in its voice. One of America's leading advertisers has 
consistently employed WWJ daily with an hour-long program for 
16 years. 

When you give your product story the benefit of WWJ's 
community acceptance, it receives added prestige, more attentive 
ears, less selling resistance . . . resulting in increased sales in a 
market that did three billion dollars retail business last year! 



FIRST IN DETROIT . . . Owned and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS 

National Representatives THE GEORGE P. HOLIINGBERY COMPANY 

Asjooofe Television Station WWJ-TV 



III, 

AM-FM 




Bone NBC Affiliate 



AM— 950 KILOCYCLES— 5000 WATTS FM— CHANNEL 246-97.1 MEGACYCLES 



27 FEBRUARY 1950 



37 




Mr. Sponsor asks.. 




Mr. Leshem 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
>Ir. Shapiro 

I do not believe 
that the stations 
throughout the 
countr y c o u 1 d 
possibl) huild a 
strong enough 
ease to warrant 
an increase in 
rates. V few rea- 
sons against such 
an increase are: 
I. \ recent 
Nielsen survey shows the loss of six 
percent in listening during evening 
hours in the metropolitan radio homes. 
This has been traced to the ever grow- 
ing number of I \ sets. For example, 
during June and Julv. 1949. between 
the hours of 8:00 and 1 I :00 p.m.. 
homes-using-radio levels were oil 17 
percent from L948. A similar sludv in 
the New ^ ork area showed it to be ofl 
21 percent. In the face of an increas- 
ing television market, with a subse- 
quent decrease in radio listening in 
these homes, an increase in radio rates 
based on a "suddenly" discovered out- 
of-home audience is simpl) not logical. 

2. The basi< media market which 
an advertiser pax s for is people. Since 
about 91 percent of all homes in the 
I nited States already have a radio, the 
out-of-home audience i- basically the 
same as the home audience. An in- 
• n ase in rates would be asking an ad- 
vert isei to pa) more for the audience 
he is alread) pa) ing for. 

3. The growth of second and third 

radios in homo can be used just as 
logi< all) as a basis for an im rease in 
rate- since the opportunities for listen- 



W lion I ho out-of-home audience is tallied will it 
entitle stations to increased rates? 



Morris Shapiro 



President in Charge of Advertising 
Trimount Clothing Co., Inc., Boston 



ing within a family have increased with 
the addition of a new radio. Out-of- 
home radios increase opportunities for 
thi> listening but do not increase the 
total number of people in an advertis- 
ii - market. 

I. Advertisers are not likely to go 
along with such an idea when they 
have been reaching this out-of-home 
audience for years, especially during a 
period when all media costs, based on 
more tangible grounds, have risen rap- 
idly. 

The loss in present day listening 
I this is sure to become greater as TV 
sets increase) and the very small num- 
ber of out-of-home radios that are un- 
duplicated seem to be a major fiv in 
the ointment. 

Philip Leshem 

Time buyer 

Grey Advertising Agency 

\ eiv ) ork 

Last night I saw 

upon the stair, 

A little man who 

was not there, 

He was not there 

again today. 
He is an out-of- 
home listener. 
The above just 
about sums up 
what I think of 
your so-called 
"additional audience. It"- actualh 
no more than a "substitute" audience. 
The advertiser is alread) paying for 
the little man who's not at home. He 
shoiildn t have to pa\ for him twice. 

Of course, the stations are NOT en- 
titled to an) increase in rates because 
of OUt-of-home listening. Their rale- 
arc presiimablv based on circulation. 
If the) can prove there is enough out- 

of-home listening to make up for tin- 
lack of in-home listening, then the rates 




Miss Schuebel 




Mr. Boggs 



are justified. If they cant, then a de- 
crease in rates is vcr\ much in order. 
Reggie Schuebel 
Director of Radio & TV 
Duane Jones Company 
New York 

The "revelation" 
about radio's out- 
of-home audience 

— though heart- 
ily acknowledged 

— gives us no 
cause to alter sta- 
tion rates. This 
is a giant step in 
the refinement of 
radio research 
and audience def- 
inition. Rather than delivering a new 
source of purchasing power, the radio 
industry now confronts its sponsors 
with a new challenge in copy appeal. 

The out-of-homer has always been 
there in bis automobile, office, tav- 
ern, etc. Along with the "convention- 
al'' living room listener, he has tuned 
in his favorite program?-, listened to 
the advertising message, has changed 
his smoking, clothing, eating habits de- 
pending on the strength of that com- 
mercial. V\ hen the final results of a 
radio advertising campaign have been 
computed — increased business against 
advertising dollars spent — purchases 
bv the out-of-home listener have been, 
and remain, verv much in the picture. 
Those sales have always been counted 
towards a renewal or cancellation. 

That's the real clue to the develop- 
ment ol "realistic" and saleable" ra- 
dio rates in American broadcasting. 
Station men can run Fridens into nerv- 
ous breakdowns with myriad station 
claims. But when the Missouri-bred 
advertiser checks v on with direct sales. 
premium offers etc., rale- must stand 

up against other stations and other 



38 



SPONSOR 



media. Its all a matter of price or 
programs. Both can be adjusted until 
a station has won its largest possible 
share of listeners I regardless of loca- 
tion • for the lowest cost to the adver- 
tiser and yet at a rate high enough to 
"irate a permanent rate card and satis- 
f\ station stockholders. 

Our personal results with Timet ) 
(aimed at an afternoon woman's audi 
ence) wherein factory and office work- 
ers participate so keenly that several 
have won jackpots suggests that cop\ 
problem to advertisers and cop\ writ- 
ers. No longer can we talk to the 
"ladies'" during the day. Or the house- 
holder alone at night. The sponsor 
would do, well to keep in mind the 
definition of radio's audience. The un- 
seen listener is no longer a nebulous 
character in "blue skv." He has taken 
shape, his position fixed. The adver- 
tising message must reach out and 
sell all of these listeners or the sponsor 
is coasting along on six cylinders when 
the Cadillac is willing and anxious to 
deliver the power of eight. 

Norman Boggs 

Executive Vice-President 

WMCA 

New York 

In spite of the 
fact that recently 
everyone is refer- 
ring to the out- 
of-home radio 
listenership as a 
newly found au- 
dience. I do not 
feel that it is 
newly found at 
all. Actually they 
are the same lis- 
teners in the radio homes being 
reached while away from home sets. 

Of course, an advertiser is reaching 
more of the potential audience in a 
market through out-of-home listening. 
However, I think we have all been con- 
scious of this audience for several 
years and stations have been selling it 
as a plus on which they had no defi- 
nite data. Simply because this audi- 
ence is now more clearly defined does 
not, in my opinion, justify a rate in- 
crease. Rather than a rate increase, 
why not use this new audience as a 
new selling point ... an audienc." tele- 
vision cannot reach? 

Frank A. Daniel 
Chief Timebuyer 
Lennen & Mitchell Inc. 
New York- 




Mr. Daniel 



WDSU'TV 

hits a new note . • 



HIGH "SEE'! 



ONE 3-MINUTE SPOT 
SELLS OVER $1500.00 TO 
TV-WISE NEW ORLEANIANS! 





Inexpensive upholstery fabrics were featured 
in a 3-minute spot by a local department 
store. No other advertising of any sort was 
used. RESULTS: Sales of over $1500.00. 
WDSU-TV HITS AGAIN WITH HIGH "SEE"! 



Ask Your JOHN BLAIR Man! 



s ; ii in in in 
I! 




EDGAR B. STERN, JR 
Portner 



ROBERT D. SWEZEY 
General Manager 



LOUIS READ 
Commercial Manoger 




27 FEBRUARY 1950 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



JEW EERY 



SPONSOR: I). H. Holme* Co. M.I MY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY On a 15-minute telecast 

featuring concert music a three-minute commercial was 
dex oted to drapery fabrics. During the following week, 72 
persons called on the drapery department and specifically 
asked to see ""the draperies advertised on television." Vo 
other advertising of any sort was used. As a result of the 
heavy response to the TV spot, $1,565.60 worth of the 
fabrics was sold. The sponsor knows now that buyers 
stop. LOOK and listen when goods are shown on video! 

WDS1 I \ . New Orleans PROGRAM: Concert music 



SPONSOR: Kranich Brothers AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : This sponsor was left 

with time on his hands until he used TV. Some 500 Howdy 
Doody watches were purchased and advertised through 
the usual channels with very poor response. Then three 
20-second TV announcements adjacent to the Hoody 
Doody Show were used. All the watches were sold with- 
in a week. The Kranich Brothers are quite convinced that 
TV can tick off sales like clockuork and they are now 
year-round advertisers via video. 



W(. VL-TV, Lancaster, Pa 



I 'lit ii ■ I; \ M Announcements 



TV 

results 



-it- 



ACTOMORILES 



SPONSOR: Motor Sales 



AGENCY: Brant Gunts 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: These sponsors made a 

huge profit on one program and it was done as easily 
as this: A 1946 Dodge for $995 was shown as a special on 
a silhouette quiz program. Less than an hour later, the 
car had been sold: this was before it reached the show- 
room. Five others wanted to buy the automobile on the 
spot. Less than 48 hours later, five more used cars were 
sold as a direct result of the show. 

WAAM-TV, Baltimore I'K'Ot.HAM: Shadou Stumpers 



CONFECTIONERY 



SPONSOR: Bishop Candy AGENCY: Franklin Brack 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Video is a sweet medium 

for this manufacturer. His Hail the Cham]) show fea- 
tures a write-in contest allowing children at home to win 
prizes. They send in a candy bar wrapper along with their 
contest answer. The first shoiv drew 700 wrappers — 
reached 15,082 — and is steadily increasing. The client 
reports that sales have increased over 500 percent. Re- 
cently, another Bishop product was plugged ami an im- 
mediate sales increase was the happy result. 

Kl VI TV, Hollywood PROGRAM: Hail the Champ 



HANDICRAFT 



SCHOOLS 



SPONSOR: N. Y. Technical Inst. AGENCY: Moss Associates 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The sponsor got an 

"education ' from his use of video. Four one-minute film 
commercials were used in the second portion of Wrestling 
From Chicago. On a single Saturday evening, a booklet 
was offered. Combined phone and mail response reached 
200. Enrollments reached 78 for a week — an all-time 
high. As a result of their TV activity, the school has in- 
creased both the number of classes in each course and the 
space for same. 



WABD, New York 



I'liiH.li \\l // resiling From Chicago 



SHOE* 



SPONSOR: Burgess Battery Co. AGENCY: Ross Roy-Fogarty 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: TV brought some high 

i ullage results for the Burgess Battery Co. The program 
consists oj intervieu s with famous and interesting hobby- 
ists with a hobbj demons/union by the MC. In one week, 
the show had increased batter ) sales //s much as 156 per- 
cent with mail response hitting as high as 2,000 letters 

and postcards in one neck. The show's producers expat 

response to be even better this spring with the show's ac- 
tion being stepped up for the "younger audience in the 
for rrinlii e bit) mil Sta ■ 



SPONSOR: National Shoes AGENCY: Emil Mogul Co. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : Sponsor and agency fig- 

ured on 1,500 replies to a test offer and got 7,772 letters. 
The offer consisted of a certificate entitling sender to a 20 
percent discount on national merchandise. A time limit of 
48 hours was imposed to minimize mail from people who 
had been informer/ of the offer by someone else. Only two 
brief mentions uere made during the firm's hour-long 
Western film telecast and 7.772 letters and postcards 
poured in. Iclual sales because to profit by the offer cus- 
tomer had to bin '. 



\\(.\ I \. ( hicago 



PROGR Wl. Hobb) Paradt 



\\ VIA. Newark 



PROGRAM: Western feature 



WILMINGTON I DELAWARE 




t 



4 4 



f 



on* 



(tfUAs 



m/H 



WDEL-TV advertisers are certain 
of three important things. First, 
they are assured the clearest picture 
for their products. Second, they 
reach the entire Wilmington, 
Delaware market — the chemical 
capital of the world. Third, their 
advertising is seen and heard by an 
established, enthusiastic audience 
show ing a consistent and phenomenal 
growth. NBC network shows and 
versatile local programming make 
WDEL-TV a necessity in this 
market. Write. 





LANCASTER, PENNA. 




WGAL-TV is an advertising must 

in the large, prosperous Lancaster, 

Pennsylvania market. It is the 

first and only television station 

in the area, no other TV station 

reaches this important section. 

The number of its viewers is 

showing an amazing growth. 

Audience loyalty and appreciation 

are assured through skillful local 

programming and the top shows of 

all four television networks — 

NBC, CBS, ABC and DuMont. 

No matter what your product 

— if you want to sell this extensive 

Pennsylvania area you need 

WGAL-TV. Write. 




TV- AFFILIATES 





Represented by Robert Meek 


er Associates 




CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO 1 


•JEW YORK LOS ANGELES 




STEINMAN 


STATIONS 




Clair R. McColloug 


h, General Manager 




WGAL WGAL-TV WGAL-FM 


WDEL WDEL-TV WDEL-FM 




Lancaster, Pa. 


Wilmington, Del. 




WKBO WRAW 


WORK WEST WEST-FM 




Harrisburg, Pa. Reading, Pa. 


York, Pa. Easton, Pa. 



21 FEBRUARY 1950 



41 




ij~~~ IN POPULARITY BY 

^ W= SURVEY 



V 



Sunday thru Saturday 


WCPO-TV 


TV Station 'B' 


TV Station 'C 


C. E. HOOPER 

6:00 pm-IO:30 pm Nov. -Dec. 
Latest 


54.3% 


31.5% 


14.2% 


PULSE (January) 

6:00 pm - Midnite 


48.7% 


27.0% 


24.3% 


VIDEODEX (January) 
6:00 pm - Midnite 


46.7% 


36.5% 


16.8% 






WCPO-TV 
Channel 7 

Affiliated with the 

Cinti. Post 

Represented 

by the 

BRANHAM CO. 




fi 




WEWS, Cleveland 

is another 

Scripps-Howard 

TV Station— 1st 

in the market. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 




510 Madison 



^Continued from page 7) 

affect the other. All media affect each 
other whin you have money to spend. 
I elc\ ision takes away more from radio 
Listening than from other media and. 
therefore, with the growth of television 
there must come a retrogression of 
radio. All this does not mean that 
1950 will not he a good year for radio. 
Television has a Ion- wa\ to go. Radio 
i- -'ill the basic huv. 

I he advertiser who takes his radio 
money and throws it in the television 
is naturally not getting the homes per 
dollar that radio gives him. The way 
I feel, a certain percent of the dollars 
you spend on television should be ac- 
tual advertising budget money. The 
rest of what \ou spend on television 
should come out of a fund set up for 
an investment in the future. In other 
words, if you have a four million dol- 
lar budget and can afford to spend 
s Kid.dlli i ol \ mil budget on telex ision, 
you might well go as high as $600,000 
or $700,000, but be careful to take the 
money out of profits and future and 
not from other media. 

I eventually see radio networks as 
supplementary buys to a television net- 
work for nighttime purchases. What 
happens in the daytime is anvbody's 
guess right now. 

Don P. Nathanson 
Director of Advertising 
Toni Company 
Chicago 



COMMENTS ON BMB 

I ha\c noted \our BMB editorial in 
a recent issue. 

Let me hold up a red lighl before 
you fall into an error that man) have 
stumbled into. You lament the fact 
that BMB has lapsed into a measure of 
popularih instead of staying in the 
circulation field. You call the pro- 
gram ratings measures of popularity. 
The\ are. But so is BMB. Ever) mea- 
sure of circulation is a measure of 
popularit) . 

IVople don't bin a newspaper miles.- 
the) like it. 

People don't bin your magazine mi- 
le-- the) like it. 

People don'l listen to a i adio station 
iinle-.s thc\ like it. 



42 



SPONSOR 




CIRCLE Four . . . CHANNEL Four . . . Four O'CLOCK 



1 his brand can pull audience for your brand in Washington, D. C. Just a few short weeks ago, 
(five, to be exact) WNBW began the "Circle Four Roundup" providing an organized vehicle for 
Western movies at four o'clock each afternoon, Monday through Friday. To prove audience and meas- 
ure reaction, WNBW offered the "Circle Four Roundup Rangers" membership card to youthful viewers. 



T. 



he results have been literally overwhelming. O/er 20,000 members have written in to date. The 
one-hour-and-fif teen-minute period holds a 24 rating, ten times the highest rated competition on three 
other stations at the time.* These loyal WNBW fans are waiting for your message. Participation 
in regular meetings of the "Circle Four Rangers" are available. Call WNBW salesmen, or NBC Spot 
Sales. 



Re 



^easons for the sensational audience acceptance of "Circle Four" promotion and programming hint 
of other choice locations. A hard-hitting threesome is yours on WNBW .... habit viewing, 
strong promotion and choice programming. In a recently concluded survey,* it was not by chance 
that WNBW, with at least two other stations on the air, held 76 ( \ of the 149 quarter-hour periods 
rated as either first or second in popularity. 



Res 



ch Bi 




NBC TELEVISION IN WASHINGTON 



21 FEBRUARY 1950 



43 




ARE 
YOU 
DYING 
TO GET 
READY (Ky.) 

., to „et Ready {&■) ~ W * 
lf you Ju* can't ««" « ainH wi lHng, 

w enUee y o«a/eer«.ar* .No, 

or able, to get Beady. .^ Trad ing 

But «e've already got ^ ^.^ 

Area , W itbo»t ?»« where realization * a 

to one plaee in KenlU ^ n , „,, . 2 7-connty area 
»ot better tnanant.e : pa»O betteo#ihantheir 

wb ere tbe people - fihestate 

— T — 1, „eat,y Prepay Parage, 
WAVE give* yon th« what 9ay . are 

you stiU itching to g 
rather get results? 

WAVE 



HBC MHLIWE 
FREE & PETERS, INC 




5000 WATTS • 970 KC 
NRTl 0NAL REPRESENTATIVES 



Conclusion : "Circulation" and "Pop- 
ularity" cannot he separated. Circula- 
tion is a reflection of popularity. 

The technical question boils down 
simply to a matter of whether, in his 
reporting of stations used, the listener 
is undid) influenced b) his most fa- 
vored programs. The comparisons we 
have made with diary studies and with 
telephone coincidental indicate he is 
not. But we also know we have to be 
careful in the wording of the question 
in order to get valid results. 

I think this adds up to the fact that 
circulation-wise and popularity-wisi 
the network affiliates will usuallv draw 
down the larger audiences. The ex- 
ception, ol course, will be those times 
of the day and those seasons of the 
\car when the independent program- 
ing excels the network programing in 
quality and audience acceptance. 

Kenneth II. Baker 

Broadcast Measurement 
Bureau Inc. 
Vew York City 



99 TV RESULTS 

I am very much interested in obtain- 
ing a complete file of all of the tele- 
vision success stories which you have 
published. I think you have done an 
outstanding job in the field, and you 
certainly have won the acclaim of the 
entire tele\ ision industry. 

I would like to get a copy of the 
brochure which you had made up in- 
cluding a great many of the television 
success stories, as well as am of the 
subsequent issues of SPONSOR which 
contained additional television success 
>Ioi ic>. 

Please bill the station for whatever 
charges are involved for this material 
"ii TV results. 

Albert J. Gillein 
WSYR-TV 

Syracuse, New York 



On page 7 of the 16 January issue, 
1 read thai you ha\<> a report on "99 
l\ Mesults." and that a copy is avail- 
able. 1 would appreciate one of these 
verj much. 

C. E. Ri< k \m> 
Executive Vice-President 
Clark & Richard Inc 
Detroit 

','"•', " "•-"-" •*« off ,.„ p WIi n ,. x , 

'"■"" ' li ■- an expanalon ..f tl„. <>r iui..nl r,.p„rt. 
ii «.ll be complete!) Indexed ;....! categorlacd. 



Memo From Alaska 



TD: _J('( NBC advertisers 

FROM: KFAR a ,J KENI 



are 



(Effective immediately, nr/itl and hfclil 

affiliated with liijL and our facilities are avail- 
able to IiIjL advertisers. 



Uloii should Know that fir/ill in ^rairbanhs is 
10,000 watts on 660 he and llhlil in ^tnchor- 
5,000 watts on 550 he — s^rlasha s two areat 



aae is 



f/ 



tations seitina ^rtasha s two taraest markets ! 



"/ 



r 



we Suaaest uou contact 



or uonr 



r 



M< 



am 



^Jo buu sates in — ^ftash, 
the llHL Scales .^Department 
Ulouna office. 

Kl Alt £_ 

Fairbanks p^M> 

ft 

Affiliates 

Represented by Adam J. Young, Jr. — I\'ew York and Chicago 

National Advg. Mgr. — G. A. Wellington 

822 White-Henry Stuart Bldg. 

Seattle 1, Washington 



KKM 

Anchorage 



27 FEBRUARY 1950 



45 



FARMER WANTS TO BUY 

{Continued from i>age 21 i 

One tack apologists for radios neg- 
1' ■< I lake is this: that manufacturers of 
farm equipment have cut advertising 
budgets because demand has consis- 
tently exceeded supply. The facts do 
not substantiate this. 

\< curding to P.I.B. reports, such 
manufacturers -pent $40,691,829 for 
newspaper and magazine advertising 
in L945; $13,682,862 for radio. In 
L948 (at this writing, figures for 1949 



have not been broken down), the) 
spent $79,655,398 in magazines and 
newspapers, an increase of 96 percent. 
That same \ear. expenditures allocated 
to radio were $19,128,150, an increase 
of onl\ 4(1 percent. It is impossible to 
report what percentage of the radio 
figure was spent in direct appeal to 
the farm potential, but all indications 
are that it was so nominal as to be 
practically non-existent. Heaviest in- 
crea>c- were in the automotive indus- 
try, via network radio, with no hard- 
hitting, direct selling to the farmer. 



It 



CUESS WE OUGHTA BUY EM 

BOTH, ELM! REV!" 




w, 



ith incomes far higher than the national average, 
our wealthy Ke<l River hayseeds have all the dough they 
need for fux-vour-rious living! ARE YOU GETTING 
VOIR SHARE? 

There's a sure-fire way to sell our high-spemlin' farm- 
ers. It's WDAY. Fargo. This remarkable station got 
the nation's highest urban Hoopers (for Total Hated 
Periods, Dee. '48-Apr. '49) and in addition, WDAY has 
a phenomenal rural coverage of the whole Red River 
\ alley! 

Our wealthy hayseeds and "city-folk" not only listen 
to WDAY ahout five times as nut. h as to any other sta- 
tion; thev also hay the products they hear advertised 
over II DM .' 

\\ rite to us or ask Free «!C Peters for all the facts 
about this fabulous station! 



wwy 




FARGO, N. D. 

NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 
FKFF «X FFIFKS. INC.. Exclusive National Representatives 



And Farm Journal figures show that 
75 percent of the entire new potential 
customers live on farms and non-rural 
farms . . . that 60 percent of the wait- 
ing markets exist where only 40 per- 
cent of the people live. 

According to an estimate based on 
the results of a sampling survey com- 
pleted late in 1949 by the Edison Elec- 
tric Institute's Farm Section, three- 
quarters of a billion dollars is the im- 
mediate market for electrical appli- 
ances on the American farm. 

There are 200 separate uses for 
electricity on the farm, including 
household appliances; 90 for electric 
motors used outside the home. Frank 
\\ atts. executive assistant of the Farm 
Journal, has done exhaustive studies 
on the farmer and how he plans to 
spend hi- money in 1950; he states 
that there is a farm appliance and 
working equipment potential of $4,- 
226,367 for every working dav! 

Interviews with 2,377 farm electric 
customers in 19 states representing 
every section of the country indicate 
an average retail market for electrical 
appliances of about $150 per cus- 
tomer. The survey was conducted 
among farm customers by 26 electric 
operating companies. 

It shows more than 40 different 
types of electrical equipment are de- 
sired immediately : home freezers, elec- 
tric water systems, and ranges respec- 
tively lead in demand. The study, 
projected on the basis of the total num- 
ber of electrified farms, indicates that 
nearly a quarter of a billion dollars in 
retail sales is represented by the de- 
mand for food freezers; and over $90.- 
000.000 would be expended for the 
pumps alone in water s\stem installa- 
tions. Willi 41 percent of rural cus- 
tomers already cooking with electric- 
ity, an additional 12 percent want elec- 
tric ranges. 

Fourth in demand are electric wa- 
ter heaters, representing about $70.. 
1)00.000 in dealers sales. Over $50.- 
000.000 worth of electric refrigerators 
is also indicated, despite the fact that 
about 85 percent of farm customers 
Imi e them already. 

The surve) further reveals that 36 
percent of farm electric customers 
cook with wood, coal, oil or kerosene, 
while 23 percent use bottled gas. Elec- 
tric water systems are being used 1»\ 
65 pen cut of these customers. In the 
number of such systems already sold 
to those interviewed, the greater num- 
ber of sales were made by hardware 



46 



SPONSOR 



all 
time buyers 
get 
into fixes 
like this 



And use SRDS to help 
get out of them 



Late one afternoon the agency's top client phoned. 
Would the Time Buyer ready a list of station recom- 
mendations in 22 cities by the next afternoon? The 
client had just got wind of a competitor's plan to 
break a test in those cities and wanted to get in at 
the same time to jam it. Had to work fast! 

The Time Buyer buckled down to a double day's 
work. No time to call the reps. No time for look- 
ing up information. No time for any help, except 
his own long experience and the Radio Section of 
SRDS. 

The next afternoon his recommended list was ap- 
proved. 





STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE, Inc. 

The National Authority Serving the Media Buying Function 

Walter E. Botthof, Publisher 

333 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO I, ILLINOIS 

NEW YORK • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES 



Such Service-Ads as this in the SRDS 

Radio Section help Time Hu\crs pick the 

right stations. 

Main radio stations help Time Buyers working un- 
der such pressures by supplementing and expanding 
the information in their SRDS listings with Service- 
Ads, like the WHDH Service-Ad shown here. 

"When I'm using STANDARD RATE," one Time 
Buyer tells us, "I'm looking for certain things. I'm 
not reading. But, if I see an ad which gives station 
coverage or other useful facts not in the listing. I 
make it a point to check it. I have to be familiar 
with each station. That's what makes SRDS so im- 
portant to me." 

When you re comparing stations, make sure to check 
the station Service-Ads as well as their listings in 
SRDS. 



Note to Station Man- 
agers: The SPOT 
RADIO PROMOTION 
II VNDBOOK reports in 

detail what sort of in- 
formation helps buyers 
decide "which stations 
they want." Copies are 
available from any 
SRDS office or repre- 
sentative at a dollar 
each. 



27 FEBRUARY 1950 



47 



dealers, with plumbers second and 
electric appliance dealers third. 

Of the 1.754 customers having wa- 
ter systems, only 224 had been solicit- 
ed by the dealer for their business. 
Phere's nothing wrong with over-the- 
transom business, but think how much 
brand impetus could be gained by 
speaking directl) to the fanner, in his 
own language, on the cherished, estab- 
lished farm programs. 

An extensive surve) of its farm au- 
dience was recently completed b) the 
WI.W Research Department to ap- 
praise what the WLW-land farmers 
plan to buy: and how much they plan 



to buy in 1950. The survey covered 
458 farm families and verifies the larg- 
er surve\ s : 

Percent of 
Farm Families 
Planning 
Farm Consumer Market to Buy 

1. home freezer 22.9% 

2. electric hand iron 11.5 

3. vacuum sweepei 11.1 

1. electric range . 10.8 

5. wringer type washing 
machine 9.9 

6. new refrigerator 9.6 

7. television set 7.3 

8. fully automatic washing 
machine 4.8 

9. automatic ironer _ 2.9 

Id. spinner type washing 

machine 1.9 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PiO+t&eA, RADIO STATION 



M** 



-^.o QTXT10N AUDIENCE W DE *' ™£ 1N !* 
•HOOPER STATION # RoaNO re,v. 

SHARE OF BROADCASTS 

HOMES USING SETSj^J^ 

24.9 1 19.1 

Monday thru Friday 20 .5 

8 ,00AM-V2.00Noon \ __j 1.4.0 °- 

r 4.5 

Monday thru Friday ■ 



TIME 



^WNoon-6:00PM 

Sunday thru Saturday 
6;00 PM-10.30PM 



15.4 



1.5 



68.8 I l4 - 3 

Get the entire story from 
FREE & PETERS 



Ml 


It 


BJ 


CBS • 5000 WATTS .960 KC 


Jjj 




M 


Owned and Operated by the 
TIMES- WORLD CORPORATION 


M ■ 


II 


w 


W0W 


ROANOKE. VA. 

JC, National Representatives 


7m ^5i 


FRE) 


Z & PETERS. II 



Farm Industrial Market 

1. fencing }<> i, 

2. new farming implements 35.4 

3. paint-: 

house __ 27.9 

harn 15.1 

outhuildings 17.2 

4. truck- 7| 

In terms of number of farm fami- 
lies planning to buy. this totals 690.- 
000 in the WLW listening area. In 
terms of cash — based on estimated 
unit prices obtained from dealers and 
distributors— it adds up to $890,000.- 
000. 

Yet Donald L. Miller. WLW Direc- 
tor of Research, has this to say : 

"I am sorry that we are not able 
, to relate . . . any 'success stories' as 
regards advertisers taking advantage 
of this great, new farm market which 
has just opened up to them. Our sales 
department advises me that they have 
not. It seems to me that advertisers 
are missing a good thing, when a re- 
gional station such as ours, with em- 
phasis on rural coverage, cannot point 
to increased advertising of electrical 
appliances to the farm and rural mar- 
ket." 

Using home freezers as a yardstick, 
let's see how the national picture look-. 
The Big Five of home freezer manu- 
facturers are. in ranking order, Gen- 
eral Electric. Philco. Frigidaire, West- 
inghouse, and Deepfreeze (Division of 
Motor Products Cot p. > 

General Electric used no radio dur- 
ing 1949 to plug freezers generalK or 
directly to the farm audience. None is 
planned for 195(1. Freezers were ad- 
vertised on GE's House Part) via CBS. 
but the program went off the air in 
December of 1948. 

Philco occasionally plugs refrigera- 
tors and freezers as a participant on 
the Don McNeil Break fast Club on 
ABC. but tlii* is directed to the general 
audience. No increase in radio adver- 
tising is planned during 1950. 

Frigidaire directed no radio spe- 
cially to the farmer in L949, plans 
none this year. 

\\ cstinghouse. too, has no plans for 
the farm market. \ ia radio. 

Deepfreeze spent $500,000 in 19 

media during L949, but none of it 

for radio, and use of the medium is 
not planned llii- \ ear. 

Other home freezer manufacturers 
listed in the Standard Advertising Reg- 
islet last \car slack up like this I fig- 
ures and breakdowns are given wher- 
ever available i : 

Amana Societ) Refrigeration i<>tal 
of $150,000 in 18 media, includ- 



48 



SPONSOR 



Real-Hfe e.xumplvs 00 f 



how to make a TIME sale 



Example 1 : 

A large beer distributor using a list of New England 
stations carefully analyzed a SPONSOR round-up 
story titled "Beer on the Air." Result: it increased its 
radio appropriation 100% on every station over which 
it advertised. 



Example 3: 

Two advertising agencies in a large city told an iden- 
tical story. In both cases a client had curtailed radio 
advertising for the 1949 summer. In both cases the 
agency gave its client a copy of SPONSOR'S summer- 
selling issue. Result: in one case $12,000 of radio 
advertising was reinstated; in the other $48,000 was 
reinstated in one area alone. 



Example 2: 

A 50,000-watt station in North Carolina advertised 
an available daily program via a full page in SPON- 
SOR. Result: the advertising manager of a large drug 
firm contacted his advertising agency and requested 
that they buy it. They did. 



Example 4: 

A station in Virginia had failed to dispose of its ex- 
pensive baseball package and the season was about to 
start. Then the manager received his current SPON- 
SOR containing an article on baseball sponsorship. 
Result: over the week-end he showed a prospect the 
SPONSOR "evidence" and landed his contract. 



These are only several of the many scores of sales which have been reported to SPONSOR as a 
result of its "use value" concept of publishing. One third of all radio stations contacted during 

a thirty-day across-the-desk survey reported one or more sales that had come about, di- 
rectly or indirectly, through the use of SPONSOR. 
SPONSOR is 100% devoted to the use-interest of broadcast-minded agency and advertiser 

executives. Its paid subscriptions among broadcast-minded buyers is the largest in its 
field. Its pinpointed appeal, bright format, and easy-to-read pages insure intensity of reader- 
ship. Whether your list permits only one magazine or several, SPONSOR is the buy. 



SPONSOR 



For buyers of Radio and Television 



Mr. Advertiser: 

TELEWAYS 
TRANSCRIPTIONS 

One manufacturer increased his 
business 20', with one 15 minute 
TELEWAYS show per week. YOU 
can do the same! 



The following transcribed shows 
now available: — 

• TOM. DICK & HARRY 

156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• MOON DREAMS 

156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• DANGER! DR. DANFIELD 
26 30-Min. Mystery Programs 

• STRANGE ADVENTURE 
260 5-Min. Dramatic Programs 

• CHUCKWAGON JAMBOREE 

131 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 
260 15-Min. Hymn Programs 

• SONS OF THE PIONEERS 
260 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 
156 15-Min. Musical Programs 

• STRANGE WILLS 

26 30-Min. Dramatic Programs 

• FRANK PARKER SHOW 

132 15-Min. Musical Programs 



TELEWAYS 



RADIO 

PRODUCTIONS, 

INC. 

Send for Free Audition Platter and low rates on 
any of the above shows to: 

8949 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 46, Calif. 
Phon« CRestview 67238 — BRadshaw 21447 





To SELL the PEOPLE Who Buy 
The MOST in the 



POPULATION 
Over 4 Million 

RETAIL SALES 
Over 2 Billion 



Use 




•v 



v \\ \\ \ 1 ' ' ' // / / 



On 



>JCFAB 



°°0 WATTS OMAHA »»*" cs 



•'J 



ing radio. 
\merican Refrigerator — 10 media; 

no radio. 
Coolerator — 17 media, with $150.- 
000 allocated to magazines; $25,- 
(l(M) to trade papers; $100,000 to 
farm papers, and S75.000 to mis- 
cellaneous; no radio. 
S haefer Co. — nine media; no radio. 
Sub-Zero Freezer Co. — trade papers 

onl\ . 
Whiting Corp. — newspapers, busi- 
ness papers, and magazines only. 
Wilson Refrigerator — trade and 

farm papers only . 
The tenor of WLW's comments to 
SPONSOR are echoed by the majority of 
farm stations. There are exceptions, 
of course, and when they occur they 
stand out brightly in a dull picture. 

The W N \X (Yankton) Farmstead 
Improvement Program is paying off 
on its basic idea of "stimulating the 
imagination of farm families in achiev- 
ing a more gracious way of life on the 
Midwest farmstead. " Currently par- 
ticipating are General Mills Tru-Heal 
irons; Utility sanders-polishers: West- 
inghouse coffee makers, electric grid- 
dles and toasters: Waters-Conley home 
pasteurizers; Speed Queen washers 
and ironers. and Tokheim air com- 
pressors. In addition, there is a daily 
news program sponsored by the Cres- 
cent Electric Co. I GE distributor!. D. 
K. Baxter Co. sponsors a 15-minute 
strip for Frigidaires. International 
Harvester used a substantial announce- 
ment schedule to promote their new 
line of refrigerators and home freez- 
ers. 

WGY and WRCB-TV. Schenectady, 
noted an increase in such advertising, 
but on a pre-Christmas level. 

WMT. Cedar Rapids, currently has 
10 appliance sponsors: one national 
manufacturer, three distributors, and 
-i\ dialers. Three of the dealers spe- 
cifically bought farm time: two of the 
remaining three have so-called general 
lime when a farm audience is avail- 
able. 

Writes Bill Ouarton, WMT's gen- 
eral manager, "When you sav there is 
a tremendous made-to-order market on 
the farms, you are putting it mildly! 
The electrical appliance people seem 
to be catching on — finally. Now, if 
we can just get the farm machinery 
manufacturers started, we will have 
accomplished a great deal." 

But, as we say, these are exceptions. 
More typical arc these, picked at ran- 
dom from the several dozen received 



by sponsor. 

KAYX. Waterloo: "Although we 
have experienced a small increase in 
volume of business from electrical ap- 
pliance dealers, which is all coopera- 
tive on the part of the manufacturers, 
these increases, in our opinion, have 
not been proportionate to the increased 
demand or ability to huv. especially 
on the part of our farm listeners." 

WGAR. Cleveland: "As of this date, 
none of the manufacturers, distribu- 
tors, or dealers of electrical appliances 
have advertised on either our own 
farm broadcasts or those of other sta- 
tions in this area . . . though it is obvi- 
ous there is a strong market." 

WPTF. Raleigh: "Generally, adver- 
tising for electrical appliances has not 
kept up with the demand for these 
items. The reason for this is partly 
our own failing. Advertising money 
is handled largely by the distributors. 
Most of them have preferred to spend 
this money through their dealers. A 
50.000 watt outlet doesn't get much of 
this. Guess it is just going to take time 
to wear out their resistance." 

KDKA: "From my contact with 
many farmers in our 117-county area, 
I personally feel that the buying pow- 
er is very high. We feel that sellers, 
dealers, and distributors are not tak- 
ing advantage of this situation." 

WFBM. Indianapolis: "I would say 
that the sellers, dealers and distribu- 
tors are NOT making capital of the 
situation." 

KMA. Shenandoah: "During the 
past four years. KM \ has received less 
time orders for electrical appliances, 
but more for hardware, poultry and 
hog feeds. In 1946, we had approxi- 
mately 200 minutes of appliance ad- 
vertising every week. Today we have 
100 minutes, a 50 percent decrease. 
Yet the increase in income and rural 
electrification shows the manufactur- 
ers are missing the boat. 

"More than that, here's an example 
of what can be done in farm radio: 
Continental-Keller Co. (retail store in 
Council Bluffs. Iowa i started with a 
small spot schedule on KMA 10 years 
ago and grossed $200,000 a year. To- 
day they're across-the-board with our 
7.45 to 8 a.m. newscast and last year 
grossed over $1,000,000. The com- 
pany president. Julius Bosenfeld. cred- 
its KM \ with this remarkable in- 
crease, and their advertising is done 
solely on home appliances." 

Whv this low-vitamin revenue diet 
in the midst of plenty? 



50 



SPONSOR 



Off-the-record comments among ad- 
vertising men connected with large 
manufacturers point the finger toward 
the front office where, they say, a lot 
of "hide-bound thinking" and "old- 
fashioned selling ideas" are en- 
trenched in the driver's seat. Most 
manufacturers think in terms of the 
overall, national picture, second-hand- 
edlv of regional markets. They expect 
the distributor to carry the load local- 
ly. Manufacturers, they continue, just 
can't be convinced a customer will bin 
his product sight unseen, hence con- 
centrate on pictorial papers and maga- 
zines. One company man thought it 
"would be a heck of a fine idea" to hit 
the farm market by radio, but wasn't 
hopeful of selling the idea. 

If the manufacturer remains uncon- 
vinced, what's being done now to 
change his mind? Actually, very lit- 
tle. Radio has done a crackerjack job 
of developing farm programs; of win- 
ning the loyalty of the most individual- 
istic segment of American listeners. 
But when it comes to selling the manu- 
facturer on taking advantage of that 
made-to-order audience, it's another 
story. Some stations admit they 
haven't tried hard enough; that their 
efforts have lacked consistency and 
drive. 

One station representative expressed 
it this way: "There's a big selling job 
to be done which isn't being done. 
Reps are aware of the tremendous po- 
tential market, have talked about it, 
but are 'too busy' to make the neces- 
sary consistent client calls. It's an 
industry job. and it's difficult — physi- 
cally, financially, and because of in- 
evitably directed interests — to do an 
institutional job. 

"The networks are too busy knock- 
ing themselves out competing with 
each other to develop this and other 
markets, and most agencies and reps 
are following the same line of least 
resistance." 

Concensus is that the BAB is the 
agency for the job. though it is work- 
ing on a relatively small budget 
(ANPA, which does a constructive sell 
for newspapers, has a yearly budget of 
$1,000,000.) "Once the BAB has the 
time and backing to operate to its full 
potentialities," added another repre- 
sentative, "we can look for them to 
carry the farm and other stories to 
the top and, with no axe to grind, talk 
in an unbiased manner with no sta- 
tion or group of stations in mind- 
something no station rep or network 

27 FEBRUARY 1950 




He Fences In 

All Types of Homes 



His audience is as wide as the country; he appeals to 
housewives in Oregon, farmers in Texas, laboring men 
in Michigan. Says Mr. D. W. Thompson, Secy-Treas. 
of the Angelina County Lumber Co., Lufkin, Texas, to 
Station KTRE: 

"Mr. Lewis' stand on old-time Americanism is just what 
this company likes to keep before the public. We are 
pleased to tell you that his program has a very wide 
listening audience in all types of homes: that is. among 
the laboring class, as well as among the business-men 
and management, and farmers. Our company owns 
foresllands in other counties . . . and the wide coverage 
afforded by KTRE facilitates our taking to the people a 
very fine daily news commentary." 

Lively, stimulating, widely followed, the Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
broadcast is currently sponsored on more than 300 sta- 
tions, ll offers local advertisers the prestige of a network 
feature, at local time cost with pro-rated talent cost. 

Since there are more than 500 MBS stations, there may be 
an opening in your city. If you want a ready-made audience 
for a client lor yourself), investigate now. Check vour 
local Mutual outlet -or the Co-operative Program De- 
partment. Mutual Broadcasting System, 1 1 10 Broad- 
way. NYC 1!! ior Tribune Tower. Chicago 11). 



51 



can do. 

I BAB has already started the ball 
rolling in this direction. The Bureau 
is currentl) working with Internation- 
al Harvester on a cooperative rate card 
for its Cub, Farm-All and other farm 
tractors. The card will bring to field 
men. dealers, and member stations full 
information about cooperative radio 
advertising available on a short-time 
basis in an effort to stimulate dealei 
use of broadcasting. In the planning 
stage are similar cards for Firestone 
Tire & Rubber. Montgomerv Ward. 
and Sears. Roebuck. I 

Whatever the solution, radio is still 
asleep at the electric switch. The farm 
market is waiting but not indefinite- 
ly. • • • 



CRACK A STONE WALL 

(Continued from page 23) 

I he) also bought a Saturday participa- 
tion in Quincy Howe- new- program. 
For added incentive, the) buttressed 
these shows with a letter-writing con- 
test "'I like Tumbo puddings be- 
cause . awarding cash pri/es to the 
winners, lo keep their radio salesmen 



on their toes. Taylor and Reed used 
the transparent lull highlv effective de- 
vice of pitting them against each other. 
I he competitive urge, thus channeled, 
paid off handsomely in rising sale- 
curves. Each radio pitchman with a 
I umbo commercial outdid himself in 
his zeal to keep up with the Joneses 
on a neighboring frequencv. 

R\ January, l ( 'i;;. when Taylor-Reed 
hit the market with its new product. 
Q-T Frosting for cakes and pastry, the 
firm was able to flex its biceps a bit, 
radio-wise. Instead ol a niggling $5,- 
000, the partners earmarked $50,000 
for radio alone. "But we still fell.— 
as we do today," Mac Taylor sa\s. 
" that we had to make e\er\ dollar 
spent for advertising jump through the 
hoop two or three times." 

For Q-T Frosting, the partners 
bought participations in nine shows in 
separate markets across the country, 
plus a scattering of announcements. 
The) bought "Mr. President."' the Ed- 
ward Arnold dramatic series, in De- 
troit. Chicago, and New York: Herb 
Sheldon. Maggie McNellis. Nanc) 
Craig, and Walter Kiernan in New 
York; "Breakfast in Hollywood in 
Los Angeles, Detroit. New York, and 




WSYR-TV 

means 

Bright, Clear, 
PICTURES 

From its antenna atop Sentinel 
Heights, 1,2(111 feet above Syracuse 
and vicinity, WSYR-TV's full radi- 
ating power of 23,500 watts on 
Channel 5 assures Central New 
"l orkers clear, steady reception of 
the outstanding TV shows — on NBC 
— exclusive. 

the Only COMPLETE 
Broadcast Institution 



•4.5 *•! 



in 






Central New York 



ACUSE 




AM • F M • TV 



Ch«nn«> 5 



NBC Affiliate in Central New York 
Headley-Reed, National Representatives 



52 



Chicago: the Fitzgeralds, in New 
York; Singin" Sam and Abbott & Cos- 
tello. in Detroit. 

The company also scheduled a heavy 
spot concentration in Boston, placing 
Q-T Frosting announcements on WBZ, 
\\ \ \C. WHDH. and \\ F.F.I. Tax lor 
and Heed credit their Boston campaign 
with doubling Q-T sales in that area 
within a 60-day period. The giant Kro- 
gei grocery chain, after a test in a 
Pittsburgh store, accepted Q-T for na- 
tional distribution through all of its 
branches-— and backed it up with a 
thorough-going promotion campaign. 
This including newspaper ads. point-of- 
sale cards and window streamers, and 
store demonstrations. 

Taylor-Reed itself, meanwhile, care- 
tulh integrated its radio activity for 
QT- with campaigns in other media, 
including newspapers, consumer and 
trade magazines, car cards, outdoor 
posters, and even a blimp — a Douglas 
Leigh "spectacular." American Express 
truck placards were added to the Q-T 
schedule in 1010. 

I he Q-T campaign again underlined 
Taylor-Reed s radio credo — that par- 
ticipations in established programs al- 
ways pa) off. As for ratings, they feel 
that a good show deserves their con- 
tinued support — and will do a solid 
selling job for them — even if its Hoop- 
er is a source of embarrassment. I The 
Q- 1 campaign, incidentally, was in- 
cluded by the Harvard School of Busi- 
ness in one of its standard textbooks as 
a model of merchandising— a point of 
quiet satisfaction to , > alemen Taylor 
and Reed. I 

The firm's most ambitious single ra- 
dio campaign was launched in support 
of its first product — Cocoa Marsh, a 
< hocolate mixture for enriching milk. 
In January, I'M", the partners bought 
a 15-minutc kid show. "Hop Harrigan. 
Ace of the Airways," three times week- 
1\ on the full Mutual network. A pre- 
mium offer of a Hop Harrigan Movie 
Scope for 25c and a Cocoa Marsh la- 
bel pulled more than 100.000 replies. 

Taylor and \\vvi\ were obliged re- 
gretfullv to ground Hop Harrigan alter 
26 weeks, because of a low budget ceil- 
ing. Thev were happv with the show, 
however, and believe that it sold a lot 
of Cocoa Marsh: thev were unable to 
determine just how much because the 
chocolate syrup market was in a murkv 
state at the time, from an inventory 
standpoint, looking back on Hop Har- 
rigan, the) feel thai probabl) thev had 
bitten olT a little more than they could 

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matter how impressive your story 
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these important facts can often mean 
a lost sale. 

The correct interpretation and pres- 
entation of station coverage figures 
is just one of the reasons more and 
more stations of all sizes are turning 
to O'Brien & Dorrance. With a staff 
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NORTH CAROLINA 



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Canada 150 

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You are assured of 
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■'■■As of February 16, 1950 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



chew at that point. Since then Cocoa 
Marsh advertising has been restricted 
to printed media — mainly point-of-sale 
material and grocery trade publica- 
tions. 

Tav lor-Reed's advertising budget last 
year was "'over 8250.000. "' with about 
one-third of that total invested in ra- 
dio. (The company's gross sales in 
1949 approximated $2,000,000.) As 
for printed media. Taylor-Reed has 
been running full-color ads for Q-T 
Frosting in such newspaper supple- 
ments as This Week and Parade, and 
black-and- whites in Family Circle and 
Western Family. Although a big piece 
of Taylor-Reed's advertising dollar is 
spent in printed media, the company's 
radio planning outlay has climbed 
steadilv since the initial $5,000 plunge. 
Tavlor and Reed are planning in- 
creased use of radio this year, and fur- 
ther exploration of television. 

Like many another firm. Taylor- 
Reed has only been playing footie- 
footie with video thus far. but they 
have already found it to be a "surpris- 
ingly effective"' sales medium. They 
discovered, for instance, after four or 
five announcements on a run-of-the- 
mill WJZ-TV opus, that results per dol- 
lar spent compared ver\ favorably with 
those of their highest-rated AM shows. 

On another occasion the partners 
bought a five-minute slice of a WNBT 
puppet show, and were amazed at the 
number of Q-T labels which descended 
on them in response to an offer of a 
simple paper cutout. They are especial- 
ly intrigued by television's ability to 
demonstrate their products — such as 
Q-T Frosting; it can be prepared be- 
fore the camera in almost the time it 
takes to read the label. Thev have been 
probing the film commercial field, but 
at this stage are still wary of produc- 
tion costs. 

The key fact about 1 av lor-Reed's 
outlook on TV is that they are genuine- 
ly open-minded about it : they are per- 
fectly willing to be shown how the) 
can increase their sales. This attitude 
is a clue to the \outhful partners da/- 
zlingly rapid rise in a field in which 
most of their competitors trace their 
histor) 1>\ generations rather than by 
a mere lew \ ears. 

It's a matter of record thai Mac Tay- 
lor and Charlie Heed hegan their busi- 
ness in 10.'!!! will) an untried formula 
for Cocoa Marsh, an oversize cooking 
pot, and ST. 200. Thev "d been at prep 
school and al Yale together, and while 
still at New Haven planned a joint 



business career. After their graduation 
in 1933, each went his separate wav 
for a time, with an eye to backlogging 
some business experience and some 
cash before joining forces for a stab at 
the brass ring on their own. 

\\ hen that day came, both Tavlor 
and Reed were on the downhill side of 
27. They sandbagged friends and rel- 
atives into investing in their new en- 
terprise, split 60 percent of the stock 
between them. Taylor became pres- 
ident of the corporation, with full re- 
sponsibility for sales and merchandis- 
ing: Reed, who is board chairman, 
handled production. 

Mac Taylor and Charlie Reed have 
definite ideas about expansion, as thev 
do about radio advertising and every- 
thing else connected with their busi- 
ness. 'I hey want their business to grow, 
of course, but not too much. They 
don't want the Taylor-Reed Corp. to 
get so big and unwieldy that thev can't 
keep a close personal tab on things. 
Nonetheless, the company's testing 
kitchens always have an idea or two 
for a new Taylor-Reed product on the 
fire. When they are ready to start serv- 
ing, it's a safe bet that radio will get 
its share. * * * 



HOW TV SELLS WOMEN 

I Continued from page 27 I 
has 11 sponsors, eight of whom are re- 
newals. Recently, a local store with 
doubts about the effectiveness of TV, 
bought one announcement to introduce 
a sandwich griller. The stock was 
cleaned out the same day. 
A Dish a Day, Tuesdav and Thursday, 
5.30 to 6 p.m.. WDSU-TV, New Or- 
leans, Louisiana. 

The delectability of their cuisine is 
a point of pride with New Orleaneans. 
To further prove the point — and the 
claims of its advertisers — WDSU-TV 
chose one of the South's best-known 
Negro cooks and gourmets, Lena Rich- 
ards. Assisted bv her daughter. Marie. 
and ad-libber Woodrow Leafer. she 
turns out meals and laughter with 
equal skill. Because of a waiting list 
of food and appliance sponsors, the 
show recentl) went from a one-a-week 
to tw ice weeklv schedule. 

HOMEM VMM. 

// hat's Vew in the Home, Monday 
through Friday, 3.45 to 4.1S p.m., 
WTMJ-TV, Milwaukee. Wis. 

\ .hi .in- I'm i.i i.i MMi and I ionnie 
Daniel! pul this -how through its paces 



54 



SPONSOR 



"Imitation is the 
sincerest form of flattery" 



SPONSOR is the most 



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trade publication 



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510 MADISON AVENUE 

NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK 



27 FEBRUARY 1950 



55 



covering cooking demonstrations, 

household hints, home planning, in- 
terior decorating and interviews. W ith 
over 30 years' experience in the nutri- 
tion field — and no newcomer to the 
airwaves — Mrs. Griem has been head 
woman on the show since it started in 
June. 19-145. Currently, it has Id spon- 
sors. One of them. Hehenstreit Furni- 
ture Co., which has been with it since 
its inception, offered a whisk broom 
In viewers. It took just one announce- 
ment to exhaust the suppl) <>f user 
2,300 brooms. It took two announce- 
ments to persuade the audience to 
stop writing the station. A series of 
announcements to plug fro/en chicken 
turn-over upped the sponsors turn- 
over from 60 to 300 sales a dav inside 
of two weeks. 

INTERVIEWS 

Just Make It Music. Monday through 
Friday, 4 to 4.30 p.m., KSD-TV, St. 
Louis. Mo. 

To SPONS<m"s knowledge, the onl\ 
male to invade the female domain thus 
far is Russ Serverin. who started a 
disk jockey show last Mav . Gradual- 
ly, it evolved its present format: inter- 
views and demonstrations of sponsors 



products. The ten quarter-hour seg- 
ments are sponsored by nine adver- 
tisers, all renewals. 

A la Mode, Wednesday, 5-5.30 p.m., 
\\ DSU-TV, New Orleans. La. 

Interesting vocations and avocations 
are the theme of this show, which fea- 
tures Joyce Smith. Director of Wom- 
en's Programs for the station. (She 
also handles The Floral Trail evening 
program. I Guests range from poets 
to FBI men. and each is chosen with 
an eve to visual interest. Thus the 
chef carves, the artist brings his etch- 
ings. 

Among many success stories to its 
credit is that of Royal Crown Cola. 
Not satisfied with results of a premium 
offer, ad agency \\ hitlo< k-Swigart de- 
cided to experiment with TV. Two 
davs later, it had orders for 1.000 
beanies (39c plus a specified number 
of bottle caps); in four days, over 
3.000 orders — and this on a program 
definitely not slanted to small fry. 

WOMEN'S TV MAGAZINE 

Market Melodies, Wednesday through 
Saturday. 2 to 4 p.m., WJZ-TV. New 
York, N. Y. 

To help the housewife lighten her 



GETS 1VE 



mt'i 



SETS! 



In Worcester, more and more sets are being tuned to inde- 
pendent WNEB! Look over the latest Hooper Index. See 
for yourself that both MORNINGS and AFTERNOONS, WNEB 
has 

MORE LISTENERS THAN THREE 
NETWORK STATIONS COMBINED! 

Worcester, Mass. Share of Audience November-December 1949 



TIME 


WNEB 


Network 

Station 

A 


Network 

Station 

B 


Network 

Station 

C 


Network 

Station 
D 


Weekday 

Morning 

8 AM-12 noon 

Weekday 
Afternoon 
12 noon-6 PM 


30.8 


11.3 


1.9 


16.7 


38.0 


34.5 


4.4 6.0 


8.6 41.1 





WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Represented by: The Holling Company, Inc. and Kettell-Carter, Inc. 



chores. Anne Russell and Walter Her- 
liby give efficiency hints. Then the 
show breaks into strictly professional 
entertainment sprinkled with fashion 
shows, dancing lessons, hair styling 
and suchlike, demonstrated by talent 
from radio, stage and night clubs. 

Show was hatched full-grown in 
May. 1949, with a saturation schedule 
of five sponsors five days a week. 
(Schedule was subsequently cut to 
four days in line with ABC's general 
program curtailment.) Sponsors were 
Stahl-Meyer meats. Hills Bros. Drome- 
dary Mixes. Brooklyn Union Gas, 
Snow 7 Crop Orange Juice and Fore- 
most Ice Cream. Of these, three have 
renewed on a full schedule, with Snow 
Crop participating on a reduced sched- 
ule. Foremost Ice Cream, a seasonal 
advertiser, went off the air with the 
advent of cool weather. 

Market Melodies reports these sales 
results: Over 700 sales of $2.95 set of 
plastic Christmas tree ornaments from 
five announcements: over 300 sets of 
$1.00 toy balloons from one announce- 
ment: and requests running into the 
thousands for free samples. Weekly 
mail averages 5.000 letters and post- 
cards. 

/ anity Fair. Monday through Friday. 
12.30 to 1 p.m.. CBS (New York. Phil- 
adelphia. Washington. D. C.) 

Big in concept as well as coverage. 
Dorothy Doan's program believes that 
modern woman wants to know how to 
live happily and usefull) in the mod- 
ern world instead of attempting to es- 
cape from it. In audience apprecia- 
tion and sponsors' sales results, it has 
been proving the soundness of that 
conception since November. 1948. 

Guests discussing such subjects as 
racial discrimination and civil rights 
have included Mrs. Franklin I). Roose- 
velt, Fanny Hurst. Mrs. Alfred Gwynne 
Vanderbilt. Walter White and Ralph 
Bunche. Guests on topics more mun- 
dane have been stylists Sally Victor 
and John Frederics, chef Louis Diat 
of the Ritz. hair stylist Victor, and 
decorators and designers like I heodore 
Muller and Elizabeth Draper. 

Typical comments on the effective- 
ness of / anity Fair are: "Simplj over- 
whelmed b\ response from over 1.100 
people" I Creative Playthings). "The 
mail was over 1.500 . . . beyond de- 
scription" i Fur Craftsmen & Stylists). 
"There were approximately 1.000 in- 
quiries from New York, Connecticut. 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania. Maryland 
and Delaware . . . about $3,500 worth 



56 



SPONSOR 



of Phenoplast sold" (Phenoplast Co.). 
Current sponsors arc Maidenforrn 
and Air Wick i William Weintraub 
agency). Monday. Wednesday. Fri- 
day; Fashion Frocks (just renewed by 
Franklin Rruck agencv I, Tuesday and 
Thursday. 

DAYTIME SHOPPING 
PROGRAMS 

Virginia Patterson Shops, Monday 
through Friday. 3.30-4. WLW-D, Day- 
ton, Ohio. 

When the station decided on a video 
shopping program in October. 1949. it 
was trying the unknown in the Dayton 
market. Armed mostly with enthusi- 
asm, the sales force went to work. And 
they did such a bang-up job that even 
before the debut of the show, it was 
completely sold out. Mrs. Patterson's 
easy combination of conversation and 
music has kept it that way ever since. 
The program has 14 sponsors who 
participate from one to five times a 
week. Each offers one TV-special a 
week, and sellouts are the rule rather 
than the exception. 

Kitty Dierken Shops for You, Mondav 
through Friday. 2.30 to 3 p.m. and 
6.30 to 7 p.m., WAAM. Raltimore. 

Innovation on this show last Sep- 
tember occurred when m.c. Kitty Dier- 
ken I fashion commentator, actress and 
entertainer I offered to take telephone 
orders for the merchandise demon- 
strated. There were seven calls, re- 
sulting in the sale of a cake sheer and 
one ash tray — considered quite a 
showing. These days, weekly phone 
calls average 900; sales have hit an 
average of $400, and the barometer is 
rising. 

Rright idea, too, was the decision to 
give the business girl a break by tele- 
vising a similar show in the evening, 
using the same merchandise. The femi- 
nine grapevine of daytime viewers is 
no small item in building the evening 
audience. 

To date, 21 local advertisers have 
used the show\ together with six na- 
tional sponsors: Ideal Toy & Novelty 
Co., Ward Raking, Brown & William- 
son for Kool cigarettes, Reddi Wip. 
Pequot Mills, and Zippy Products for 
starches. All report sales increases, 
and Hooperatings show that Miss Dier- 
ken's 6.45 p.m. share of the audience 
is 44.8 percent, substantially higher 
than either of the competing shows. 
Kathi A orris, Your Television Shopper, 
Monday through Friday. 11 a.m. to 12 
noon, WABD, New York, N. Y. 



It took a Gotham \ia\ to crack one 
of the traditional holdouts of airborne 
advertising — the department store. 
\\ ben Saks-34th decided to trv video 
last November, it was no secret at the 
huge stoic thai SO] >f the advertis- 
ing brains weren't exactl) enthusiastic. 
\ I most overnight, they became rooters 
for the stoic- sponsorship of the first 
half-hour of Kathi Norris. 

In a speech before the National Re- 
tail Dry Goods Association in Janu- 
ary, sales promotion manager Arthur 
See said: "We have just completed the 
first 10 weeks of sponsorship . . . and 



I can sav with dead earnestness that 
I \ looks to me like a natural for re- 
tailers who want to sell merchandise 
hard, and move merchandise quickly. 
Let me give you the best for-instance 
that proves mv point: on one program 
our Kathi Norris devoted about three 
minutes to a $6.95 dress. We sold L10 
dresses dircctlv lie cable to the pro- 
gram. Another day she showed men's 
overcoats — even put one on her hus- 
band. Wilbur Stark, and brought his 
enthusiasm into the sale. At the close 
she told the audience, 'Call your hus- 
band now. and tell him to go over to 



a SOUP fftOKT for 

KRNT IN DES MOINES' 
NEWSCAST HOOPERADE 



KRNT NEWS SHOWS OUTHOOPER ALL 
NEWSCASTS OPPOSITE THEM ON 
ALL OTHER STATIONS 




VANDYKES 

t HA TS DYNAMIC 



City Zone, May thru Sept., 1949 



EXPERIENCE, VISION, INITIATIVE ENERGY, SHOWMANSHIP KEEP KRNT IN THE 
LEAD ALWAYS — IN ALL WAYS! 




The station with the fabulous personalities and the astronomical Hoopers 



21 FEBRUARY 1950 



57 



Saks-34th on his lunch hour and get 
one of these coats.' That afternoon 
five men showed up and each bought 
a $59 overcoat. All five said their 
wives had called them after seeing the 
TV program. 

". . . We're behind OUR television 
shopper 100 percent. We've backed up 
the program by setting aside one of 
our windows to plug the show . . . 
circulars have been distributed 
throughout the store and dropped into 
all out-going packages: we run a line 
or two in nearh e\crv ad. . . ." 

Other Saks-34th sales results which 



followed single pitches include: 2,258 
pairs of nylon hose sold at 78c; 141 
bras at $4.00; 57 knit dresses at 
S10.95; 296 six-piece doll sets at 
S3.00; 300 children's dresses at $2,98; 
two fur coats at $299. 

Part of the Kathi Norris success is 
undoubtedly due to her infectious per- 
sonality and unusually photogenic face 
and figure. Rut the showmanship be- 
hind the program must also be cred- 
ited for the fact that it is considered 
one of the hottest properties in TV; 
it has a long waiting list of sponsors, 
and Kathi has had invitations from 




Wm 



Dominant radio coverage in central Ohio 
is WBNS plus WELD-FM. This rich market 
has retail sales of $785,533,000 . . . And 
most of that is spent by WBNS families. 
That is why WBNS does the most profitable 
selling job in central Ohio. The tremendous 
selling power of this station has been proven 
again and again by local and national ad- 
vertisers. 

ASK JOHN BLAIR 



POWER 5000 D 1000 N CBS COLUMBUS, OHIO 



other \ ideo stations to "please come to 
our city and do likewise." 

In addition to its topflight selling 
job, the show is very effective public 
relationswise. OriginalK it had no 
sponsors: it was designed as a public 
service for viewers, who had onlv to 
call or write to have Kathi purchase 
items for them and mail them off. At 
that time, it was a one-woman propo- 
sition: now there is a staff of seven to 
handle mail orders and help hunt up 
non-sponsored items to feature on the 
program. Kathi loses monev on the 
deal — but certainly no audience lov- 
alty. inn potential sponsors. Of the 
more than 3,800 items displaved dur- 
ing its first 11 months on the air. 
about 3,600 were non-sponsored. 

Another liil of showmanship which 
lends intimacy and salesmanship is the 
occasional appearance of Kathi's hus- 
band. Friend hubby savs he got into 
the picture as a "sort of human cough 
drop." to give Kathi's throat a rest 
during the full hour she's on the air. 
His unaffected interest in the products 
is a distinct advantage. 

Over 50 advertisers have partici- 
pated in the show, and more than 70 
percent have renewed. Current spon- 
sors include, in addition to Saks-34th. 
A & P for Jane Parker bakeries I Paris 
& Peart) : Sunkist Oranges (Foote. 
Cone & Relding t : Goodman Noodles 
and Claridge canned hamburgers ( Al 
Paul Lefton I : Vodora (J. D. Tarch- 
er) ; Fashion Frocks I Franklin 
Rruck I : Swanson Chicken Mix (Ca- 
ples Co. I : Gravymaster I Samuel 
Croot) : Mueller Manufacturing for 
bottle stoppers I Cramer - Krasselt) ; 
and Spin detergent I \\ . S. Hill Co.) 

Space prohibits a roster of sales fig- 
ures for the show, but a small sample 
is indicative of the overall picture. 
Fashion Frocks, a Cincinnati dress 
manufacturer who hires women to sell 
dresses directly to other women, signed 
more agents per dollar of advertising 
than the companj had in over 40 years 
of magazine, newspaper and radio ad- 
vertising: and the company shows a 
net profit of $25,000 directlj traceable 
to the program. 

\s a test. Coty, Inc.. agreed to let 
Kathi offer a perfume sample — once — 
and set aside 500 samples to cover re- 
quests. The company was pleasantly 
disconcerted when il was deluged with 
12.202 requests hut not too discon- 
certed to sign a renewal contract im- 
mediatel) . 

The West Coast manufacturer of 



58 



SPONSOR 



Jiffy-Stitcher, a hand gadget retailing 
for $2.95 which speeds up sew ing time, 
report 156 phone orders and $400 in 
immediate sales from one participa- 
tion. In two days, the program sold 
over 300 machines totaling $885. The 
company says. "This is the greatesl 
volume of results per dollar spent than 
from any other television or radio used 
in the country." 

NIGHTTIME PARTICIPATION 
PROGRAMS 

FASHIONS 

The Model Speaks, Monday. 7.40 to 
8 p.m., WFIL-TV, Philadelphia. 

Violet Hale, former Powers model. 
charm authority and first president of 
the Models Guild of Philadelphia, pre- 
sents two models each week to demon- 
strate and discuss the costumes and ac- 
cessories heing shown. 

Current sponsors are Corliss Furs, 
Scotch Tape (national account), and 
Gruber's Ginger Ale. Most spectacu- 
lar sale: a mink coat, at $3,200, which 
the customer said she first saw on the 
program. Seller Corliss Furs is a 
$120-per-week participant. 

GARDENING 

The Floral Trail, Monday, 7.30 to 
7.45 p.m., WDSU-TV, New Orleans. 

Joyce Smith, leading garden expert 
of the South (who also telecasts the 
station's daytime A la Mode) is a 
virtual encyclopedia on what the gar- 
dener should know. She reallv digs 
into her subject, too, showing viewers 
how to plant and transplant anything 
from a seed to a large shrub. The 
oldest participating show on the sta- 
tion, it recently celebrated its first 
birthday; it averages 200 letters a 
week. One of its sponsors, a garden 
magazine, averaged 20 to 25 sub- 
scriptions a week. 

INTERVIEWS 

Hi Lights, Tuesday. 6.45 to 7 p.m.. 
WICU-TV. Erie, Pa. 

Miss Hy Yaple, society editor of the 
Erie Dispatch, is mistress of cere- 
monies of this show, which features 
interviews with business girls, career 
women, college girls and Junior 
League presidents. 

It carries two regular sponsors, both 
of whom have renewed since it started 
in September, 1949. One, the Allen & 
Morril Bauman Co., local upholsterers, 
furnished a living room set for the 
show. The other, the Darne Shop, an 
exclusive shop for women's wear, sup- 



plies three models, with outfits, for 
each show, and reports seasonal sales 
have increased b\ more than half. 
The PeggJ Tonne Show. \\ednesda\. 
7.30 to 7.45 p.m.. WFIL-TV, Philadel- 
phia. Pennsj K ania. 

Featuring the actress and fashion 
authority of that name, this show is 
built around interviews with local and 
visiting celebrities. 

Current sponsors are Scotch Tape. 
Magic Wrap. Del Monte foods and 
Quaker State Mushrooms. The latter 
sponsor credits the program with in- 
creasing sales of his own brand, and 
extending general consumption of 
mushrooms. 

WOMEN'S TV MAGAZINE 

Designed for Women, Friday, 8.30 to 
9 p.m., KNBH, Hollywood, Calif. 

This video potpourri pivots around 
Lee Hogan. erstwhile NBC fashion edi- 
tor who entered radio some ten years 
ago. But far from being limited to 
fashions, it runs the gamut of sports, 
education, food, music, and the family. 
In more serious mood, it presents re- 
porters who uncover some of the dark- 
er side of L.A. life, such as the hous- 
ing and blood bank situations. 

And although it is designed for 
women, letters prove it has a loyal 
male following. Sold out almost con- 
tinuously, the show is currently spon- 
sored by MJB Coffee. Safeway Stores, 
and Sears. Roebuck. 

NIGHTTIME SHOPPING 
PROGRAMS 

KPIX Teleshopper, Friday, 7.15 to 
7.45 p.m., KPIX, San Francisco, Calif. 

Comparative newcomer to the TV 
ranks is Bunty Fabian, whose weekly 
video visits climax daily shopping 
tours. Along with good buys culled 
from her browsing, Bunty gives view- 
ers advice on home decorating and 
budgeting, fashions, styles and charm. 
She brings along a guest, too . . . usu- 
ally an expert on the subject at hand. 

Most outstanding sales record hung 
up by the four-month-old program was 
for Fresherator Co., manufacturers of 
a refrigerator dish. Four weekly an- 
nouncements sold 50.000 dishes; were 
the only form of advertising used dur- 
ing that period. 

Window Shopping, Tuesday. 7.35 to 8 
p.m., WFIL-TV, Philadelphia. 

A show window type of presenta 
tion, with models "coming to life" in 
view of women shoppers, is handled b\ 
Violet Hale (also of the station's The 



in Sound 
Reproduction 





UMG-VIOffi 



mmgii^s 



LAM-WORTH 

FEATURE PROGRAMS, lie. 

113 WEST 57th STREET, 
NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

Network Calibre Programs 
at Cocal Station Cost 




We have a happy answer to the 
frequently asked question: "How's 
Business?" During January, 1950, 
KQV's local and national spot hill- 
ings ran well ahead of the same 
month last year. Since January 
23, we have renewed a Vt day- 
time strip . . . sold a V2 on Sun- 
day nights, and early in March 
will begin the "Meet The Men- 
jous" series commercially five 
days a week for 52 weeks. For 
further details and availabilities 
ask Weed and Company. 



KQV 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 
MBS — 5,000 Watts — 1410 



21 FEBRUARY 1950 



59 



MR. ADVERTISER: 



Did you see page 
13 in the February 
13 issue of Spon- 
sor? 

i^kech bach anil 
recta it. 



To Cover the 
Greater Wheeling 
(W.Va.) Metropolitan 
Market Thoroughly 
YOU NEED 

WTRF 

AM-FM 
Proof . . . 

Consult the Hooper Area Coverage 
Index, 3-County Area 1949, and see 
how well WTRF covers the Wheeling 
Metropolitan Market of Northern 
West Virginia and Eastern Ohio. 

Studios and Transmitter: 
WOODMONT, BELLAIRE, OHIO 

Represented by 

THE WALKER CO. 



Model Speaks). Sponsors include Cor- 
liss Furs, Scotch Tape. Gruber's Gin- 
gei Ue. Guitare Lipstick, and a local 
hairdresser. 

Ruth Crane's Shop by Television 
(Tuesday, 7.30-8 p.m., WMAL-TV, 
Washington, I). C.) is not a participat- 
ing program like the others described 
I ere. It lias one regular sponsor. But 
it- format resembles that of several 
participating shows. 

Miss Crane, Director of Women's 
Activities for the station sine- I'M I. 
was the first woman to step before 
the cameras on a regular schedule in 
the nation s capital, and [pioneered in 
shopping programs . . . particularly in 
the technique of having viewers phone 
in and actually place orders for the 
items being demonstrated (see picture 
page 0(1 1 . Sponsored by the lleclit 
department store, the program plugs 
numerous low-COSl items: calls run to 
nearl) L50 a week: sales average over 
$800. 

The conclusion to this roundup of 
Luis and figures is: If you want to 
sell a woman, get another woman to 
do it — and getting her to do it on TV 
doesn t hurt either. * * * 



BMB POSERS FOR SPONSORS 

(Continued from pages 2!i. 2 ( J l 

Ol ISTION 1 

verj bigness of the radio coverage pic- 
lure makes man) advertisers imagine it 

to he equall) expensive. The fact is 
that it is the leas! costlv of anv major 
media. The new BMB sludv will help 
demonstrate that. 

Ol ESTION 2 

Outside densel) populated areas, par- 
ticularly, there is the question of evalu- 
ating a better time availabilit) against 
a better l!\ll!. The new studv offers 
more concrete help in deciding the best 
huv . 



satis! i 



Ol ESTION 3 

ten pel cent might he a vi 
tor) level. 

BMB ha- always discouraged the 
idea of arbitrar) levels in huv ing radio 
coverage, and buyers land sellers I 
have -one right on their arbitral v wav. 
This was hold natural and inevitable. 
BMB doesn't claim statistical accuracj 
within five per cent either way. Know- 
ing thai bordei line cases could just as 
well he included or excluded, BMB has 
officiall) frowned upon arbitrar) di- 
visions. Despite this -land, nobod) 
i Please linn iii page 63 • 



MARKETS ON THE MOVE 

i Continual from pain' .'51 i 

emergence to the commercial!) signifi- 
cant fact that 82 percent of the adult 
population rides public transportation 
in urban centers. This is the public 
that likes radio, both at home and in 
transit, when radio-as-\ ou-ride is prop- 
erlv programed. 

I'he basic ingredient in transit radio 
programing i- music. Extremes are 
avoided. Preferred are "listenable" 
popular tunes of todav and yesterday 
— musical comedy, Hawaiian, organ, 
novelt) . and ballad. 

News is universall) popular, but is 
limited to capsuled, headline items, 
with heavy accent on local material. 
I he local slant has proved popular. 
Other favored breaks in the musical 
fare are provided bv weather reports. 
time signal-, -ports scores, etc. 

Commercials are usuallv spaced a 
minimum of five minutes apart, but 
mav average as main as 18 in an 
hour. Transit radio in all 19 transit 
radio cities is the province of FM sta- 
tions, whose static-free signals make 
possible this kind of broadcasting. 
Homes equipped with FM sets get the 
same programs. I lev general!) re- 
port that tlie combination of music, 
short features, and commercials make 
easy listening. 

But it is the moving market, the 
bus and street car audience, which is 
the immediate concern ol transit radio 
sponsors. I hi- is a "counted" audi- 
ence, transit companies know the 
approximate number ol riders on their 
s) stem during anv hour or half-hour 
in tlie dav. \n advertiser knows bow 
man) ears he is huv ing for a given 
sei ies ol announcements. 

Of equal import, the sponsor knows 
who i- bearing his message. Each sta- 
tion (with the aid of transit statistics) 
can furnish detailed breakdowns on 
rider occupations, income, and ages — 
and when they ride. This makes il 
possible to time and slant cop) to a 
sponsors natural prospects with a re- 
markable degree ol precision. 

The statistical pattern varies from 
<itv to city. But in general the picture 
looks about like this: At 6:00 in the 
morning, laborers and factor) work- 
ers start for work. Bv 7:30, the white 
collar workers, including men and 
women office workers, are on their 
wav . 

\l i!:l.") the passengers include a 
high percentage of the upper income 



60 



SPONSOR 



levels business executives, profession- 
al men and women (the group who 
reach their offices between 9:00 and 
9:30). 

About 8:45, the riders are heavil) 
sprinkled with teenagers and college 
students (tomorrow's ke) customers as 
well as eurrent specialized buyers). 
H\ 9:30, and continuing to around 
1:00, the transit audience consists 
mainl) of housewife shoppers on their 
way to market — purses and shopping 
bags much in evidence. Most ol these 
women ride alone: then the) re bettei 
listening prospects. 

In mid and late afternoon Mrs. 
Housewife treks home, followed l>\ the 
various groups who preceded her on 
their \\a\ to work thai morning. From 
about 7:01) | (1 midnight the transit au- 
dience consists chief!) of people enter- 
tainment-bound and returning home. 

One group of riders in this mass 
dail\ movement has more than ordi- 
nary interest for the transit advertiser 
anxious to sell women. 

For the most part this group is not 
available to daytime radio. It can be 
reached by printed media —but main 
national advertisers (see ""Facts That 
Talk."" sponsor. 30 January, page 40) 
have found that the impact of the hu- 
man voice is thejr most effective ad- 
vertising medium. 

The group referred to consists ol 
women employed outside their homes 
during the daytime. Married and un- 
married, mothers, daughters, widows — 
they are not onl) consumers, but in a 
great man) cases also buyers for their 
families. 

It is known in Cincinnati, for ex- 
ample, that on an average weekda) 
there are over 76,000 women rider.; 
alone homeward bound after work. 
Between 1:00 and 1:30 in the after- 
noon 13.000 of them start trips that 
last for an average of 2b! minutes. Bv 
5:00 the total jumps to nearly 23.000. 

Nighttime listening b\ this group 
has certain advantages, but it's expen- 
sive for a specialized audience. \n 
advertising impression intended to 
make a woman remember to bin a 
product "the next lime she is out shop- 
ping" can be particularl) important in 
the case of employed women: for the\ 
usually make a great main purchase* 
during their lunch hour and while the) 
are in the city. Thus announcements 
timed to catch a woman going to and 
from work are distinctly advantageous. 

The basic commodit) of am transit 
radio station is the 50-word announcc- 

27 FEBRUARY 1950 



ments. The rate l"i such announce- 
ments i- calculated b) most stations on 
the basis i at maximum frequenc) i ol 
$0.75 to $1.00 per thousand riders 
during class "" \ time I rush hours) 
and S 1 .00 oi inoi P for "B" and "C" 
time (shopping and entertainment 
hours and Sundays). One-time an- 
noun ements w ould be proporl ionatel) 
higher. 

While each station sets its own time 
classification. "A" time i- normall) 
the period w hen 75 pi reenl oi more "I 
the transit vehicles are in use. "I» 
time i- period when 1(1 percent or 
more are in use: "C time when [ess 
than Id percent are in use. 

Here are other transit-radio success 
-lories. 

Swift started a campaign of 12 an- 
nouncements per week on Wednes- 
day, Thursda) and Frida) for Jewel 
Shortening on KPRC-FM, Houston, in 
May of last year. In the index. March- 
April sales in 24 chain supermarkets 
are used as a comparative base (Jewel 
vs. a leading rival brand I . 



lul) 


132 


65 


VugUSl 


188 


108 


Septi mber 


185 


132 


( October 


171 


120 


Novembei 


189 


87 



Ovei the seven-month transit radio 
pei iod Jewel -i ored a sales in< rease ol 
51 ' , : brand " \." w ithout transit ra- 
dio, increased sales -' < . 

A downtown St. Louis women - spe- 
cialt) -tore advertised a $69.00 Fur- 
trimmed coal in both newspapers and 
on transit radio. KXOK-FM engaged 

the market research fir Edward 

{,. Dood) and Company to check the 
effectiveness of the transit advertised 
sale. The Dood) representative inter- 
viewed 116 women from Thursda) 
through Saturda) I 10-13 August) 
who approached coat racks marked for 
the sale. These women were asked, 
"How did you hear about this fur- 
trimmed coal for $69.00?" Half said 
the) heard ii advertised while riding 
a bus or streetcar. 

The billowing -ales were traced di- 
rectlv to transit radio listeners: 



March- \pnl 
May _... 
June 



sw ill Jewel Brand "A" 

100 I Index) 100 (Index) 

85 Hil 

106 nil 





Quantity 




Price 


Total 


Thu. 


2 


ui 


$ 69.00 


- 138.00 


Fri. 


3 


(a 


69.00 


207.00 




1 


(a 


98.00 


98.00 




1 


<a 


224.00 


221.00 




1 


Ui 


2o;\iiii 


298.00 



Puts basic market facts 
at your fingertips — 



CONSUMER MARKETS makes basic 
market measurement data for every 
State, enmity and city easily get-at-able. 
Its 77 1 pages of fact- and figures are so 
arranged that you can ea.-ilv extract am 
-ingh index you may want; or get a com- 
plete -tati-tieal picture of an\ consumer 
market in the U. S., U. S. Territories and 
Possessions, Canada, or the Philippines. 

Conveniently located Service-Ads, like 
The Cleveland Press' shown here, sup- 
plement and expand the listed data with 
information about the market coverage 

of indh idual media. 

"CONSUMER MARKETS is a quick, 
easy, informative reference," says one 

agenex executive. *" \ delight to a 1 1 \ 
media or market research department." 

If you are not using the 1949-1950 Edi- 
tion ol CM, -end for Full Explanation 

bolder detailing the information it makes 
a\ ailable to you. 




LOOK AT 
NORTHEASTERN 
OHIO THIS WAY- 

So* 4 major martotiT $•« why 
you notd Th. Clovoland Pnil 
ond at r*oil 3 otktr nowipopon? 



H 1 O 



Tbf IV-. .h^rlully Mlmi 

>*>bi Jlr MB I I 



Ni-v-ju(»r- ■ 






adfc 






fca c na a 



Consumer IHaita 



One of 258 Cervice-Ads that supplement 

market data listings in the 1949-1950 

CONSUMER MARKETS. 

A Section of Standard Rate & Data Service 
Walter E. Botfhof, Publisher 

333 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, III. 
New York • lot Angeles 



61 



- 



L3 



1 <§ 

i <n 



69.00 897.00 

55.00 55.00 

108.00 108.00 



$2,025.00 

Nearl) half of the 58 persons who 
heard about the sale through transit 
radio had not been in Garland's for 
periods ranging from two months to 
five years. Vnother 13.8' < said the) 
couldn't remember when the) had vis- 
ited < larland's last. 

\\ hat department stores have accom- 
plished with promotions for special 
items gives more than a faint clue to 
what nationally advertised brands can 
accomplish in special promotions for 
their own brands. In Cincinnati, the 
John Shillito Companv used eight an- 
nouncements to sell S5.95 washable 
junior size dresses. No other media 
were used. One hour and 20 minutes 
after the store opened ( 12:30 p.m. on 
Mondays) the entire stock of 250 
dresses had been sold and the balance 
of the schedule had to be hurriedly 
cancelled. 

In Houston the Danburg chain of 
1 I neighborhood department stores 
featured seven items on transit radio 
for only three days. All stores sold 
out all seven items. And it rained all 




COMMERCIAL MANAGER 

Progressive, personable, married, 
educated, experienced young man 
available for Sales or Commercial 
Manager of sound established 
station. Experience includes pro- 
duction and air work; Sales man- 
ager, Commercial manager and 
General manager of 250 watt 
radio station, and two years 
Printing and Publishing Company 
executive. Best of professional 
and personal references available 
upon request. Write H. J. Forbes, 
103 Holland Ave., Morgantown, 
West Virginia. 



three da\ - ! 

Foley's Department Store. Houston, 
selected sport shirts, pillow cases, and 
diapers for promotion on transit radio 
only, and did not display these sale 
items in the store; customers had to 
ask for them specifically. Mondav. fol- 
lowing Father's Day ( normally a slow- 
day i. was test day. Only S61.00 worth 
of announcements were used. At the 
close of business Tuesday all shirts 
were gone (630 units I ; pillow cases 
were gone I 720 units I : diapers sold. 
59 dozen. 

The Fanny Farmer candy stores in 
Cincinnati recently reported that be- 
fore their campaign began, sales were 
limning about 1% below last year. 
\llcr 12 weeks of bus and trollev ra- 
dio, sales are averaging T/< above last 
\ ear's. Cincinnati is currently the 
leading < it\ in the Fanny Farmer dis- 
trict, which includes Detroit. This 
leadership is considered unusual by 
the ( and\ chain's management, be- 
cause man) of the other cities in the 
same district have no competing 
chains, while in Cincinnati both Maud 
Muller and Mary Lee chains battle 
Fanny Farmer for business. 

Such national advertisers as Frigid- 
aire Sales Corp., Ford. Chevrolet, and 
Plymouth dealers, Feltman & Curme 
Shoes. Bond Stores, Household Fi- 
nance Corp., General Baking Co., 
United Fruit Co., Loft Candy Shops, 
Johnson Candy Co., Arthur Murrav 
Dance Studios and Gruen Watch Co. 
sponsor transit radio. Regional and 
local sponsors in many other categor- 
ies are using the medium. 
Do riders like it? 

In no city have more than 10 per- 
cnt of the riders expressed disapprov- 
al. In most cities approval has ranged 
from 95 percent up. Bui radio-as-you- 
ride is encountering enough opposi- 
tion. In St. Louis, it's the Post-Di.s- 
• <itch. in Washington. 1). C. the Post 
and in the New York Grand Central 
Terminal light it was the editor of The 
New ) orker. Thus, much of the dis- 
approval stems from printed-media ef- 
forts to strangle the newly-born medi- 
um before it can grow. The (.rand 
Central Terminal operation, however, 
should not be confused with transit 
radio. The former utilized not radio. 
but a public address system and was 
not programed by radio people. 

Among riders, those who don't like 
transit radio are mainly the vocal mi- 
nority who don't like radio — period. 
Hut it will take more than the protests 



of competing media, the disgruntled 
complaints of the minority, to perma- 
nently stunt this new mode of radio 
application. 

Negotiations are in progress by 
Transit Radio Inc. in about 100 of the 
country s leading markets for addition- 
al transit radio systems, \lanv of these 
markets will be added during 1950 to 
the 19 now open to advertisers. * * * 



THE BIG PLUS 

^Continued from page 25) 

new study the middle and upper in- 
come groups comprise 78 percent of 
the audience compared to 70.1 percent 
in August. 

Listening at work moved up to sec- 
ond place in the November study. It 
ranked third in August when the at- 
work audience is cut into by vacation- 
ing employees. The at-work audience 
increased to 25.1 percent in Novem- 
ber from 20.8 percent in August. 

A small increase was registered in 
November for out-of-home listening 
while visiting. People spend less time 
outdoors during cold weather, more 
time visiting friends and relatives. 

Increased listening in restaurants 
and bars reported in the November 
survey is attributed to the absence of 
TV baseball broadcasts in winter. 

\\ here does all "I this "big plus ' 
listening take place? 

The lion's share of it is done in auto 
mobiles. Since more than one-half of 
the 43.8 million families in the U. S. 
own cars, there obviousl) remains a 
tremendous number of uncounted lis- 
teners. The November study showed 
that 41.2 percent of the out-of-home 
audience in metropolitan New \ ork 
listened in cars. 

An automobile audience survey 
taken by Pulse 10-16 December for the 
Southern California Broadcasters As- 
sociation throws additional light on 
auto listening: it showed that 72.5 per- 
cent of the 8.908 autos polled were 
radio equipped; the survey took in 
eight counties. Listening was at its 
peak at 2:45 p.m. with 38.5 percent of 
all car radios turned on. High for the 
evening was 30.6 percent registered at 
7 p.m. During an average day people 
listened to car radios 32.1! percent of 
the time they were driving. 

A WRC study showed that approxi- 
matelv 156.000 persons listen to auto- 
mobile radios in Washington. I). C. 
\vcragc on-the-road listening time was 



62 



SPONSOR 



about 50 minutes daily. 

At the time this article went to press 
Dr. Etoslow had not completed process- 
ing an out-of-home listening surve\ of 
metropolitan Chicago. However, he 
did reveal that 32.9 percent of all Chi- 
cago families reported some out-of- 
home listening every day. He added 
that there were considerably more men 
in the out-of-home audience than wom- 
en. The 20-34 age group was again 
the largest in the out-of-home audience. 

Often "the big plus" is a vital factor 
in transforming a negligible program 
rating into an impressive one. For 
WNEW's 3:30 period on Friday the 
at-home rating was 2.3, or about 110,- 
900 listeners. Adding its out-of-home 
rating of 1.4 boosted the program 
mark to 3.3. The show was actually 
reaching 148,900 listeners. 

W.XKW has lon» been aware <>l the 
value of the plus audience. For the 
past several years it has aired shows 
designed to interest such listeners. 

Programing for the out-of-home 
audience is not exclusively a New York 
technique. Station K.CBC. Des Moines, 
has had phenomenal out-of-home suc- 
cess. It uses a minimum of voice, and 
a maximum of music with news broad- 
casts on the hour and frequent service 
spots through the day. KCBC has had 
an average audience increase of 97 
percent since it adopted this music and 
news format. When a local Ford dealer 
made a car listening survey in Des 
Moines, he discovered that his "big 
plus" was tremendous. 

But out-of-home programing isn't re- 
stricted to musical shows. The WMCA. 
New York, giveaway show Tune-0 is 
geared to snare a large share of the at- 
work listening group. The program is 
heard Monday-Friday from 1:30-2 
p.m. After two weeks there were two 
out-of-home winners: one from a fac- 
tory, the other from an office. 

In the future out-of-home listening 
figures will be one of radio's biggest 
selling tools. This segment of listeners 
will remain comparatively unaltered by 
the influx of new media. It is unlikely 
that television sets will be installed in 
automobiles; and for obvious reasons 
TV will not replace radio at work. In 
the November studv these two cate- 
gories amounted to 66.3 percent of the 
total out-of-home audience. It is ap- 
parent that millions of out-of-home lis- 
teners remain uncounted. When they 
are. advertisers will have an accurate 
estimate of the total radio audience for 
the first time. * * • 



BMB POSERS FOR SPONSORS 

{Continued from /'</;:<' 60) 

know- better than BMB thai there are 

practical considerations which in some 
instances make the divisions into "pri- 
mary," "secondary," and "terciary' 
coverage, based on arbitrary listening 

levels, the onl\ realistic way of doing 
business. 

Whether 50 per cent should be the 
line of demarcation between primal) 
and secondary coverage is obviously a 
question on which unanimous agree- 
ment isn't possible. Coverage level? 
are a matter of practicality. If 50 pe 
cent weren't the bottom level for in- 
tense coverage, it would be some other 
figure. 

This is particularly true for big 
power stations and network stations 
g( nerally. Timebuyers and others want 
to visualize the area of a station's pri- 
mary coverage. They can then go to 
the detailed county figures for the so- 
lution of special problems. 

For numerous smaller stations the 
cost of producing a coverage map on 
any other than a "levels" basis would 
be prohibitive. Nevertheless, the new 
listening breakdown will enable buy- 
ers to cut right across arbitrary level? 
in obtaining the best coverage pat 
terns. When an advertiser or agency 
asks for coverage data, he should re- 
ceive not just the minimum "levels" 
data, but the complete story. Too much 
vital to the interests of the man who 
pays the bills is hidden in the county 
listening breakdowns. 

In order to maintain comparability 
with 1946 coverage maps, the Colum- 
bia Broadcasting System tentatively 
plans to use the same basis for its new 
map. In the market data box it will 
show 1-7: 3-7: 6-7 times-per-week 
listening figures. 

The thought to showing listening on 
a 3-7 basis may indicate a feeling 
known to be shared by some others in 
the industry, that in some instances the 
6-7 figure may be cutting it a little too 
fine. One instance in which it could be 
unrealistic would be listening to a sin- 
gle program 0-7 times a week. A great 
many programs command that kind of 
listening. 

Without audience or popularity mea- 
surements in main areas, advertisers 
have little other than BMB data on 
which to base plans for merchandising 
programs. It isn't detailed data in these 
cases, but an arbitral) coverage divi- 
sion that is needed. 




FOR NEW YORK'S 

THIRD GREAT 

MARKET 

ALBANY 

TROY 

SCHENECTADY 

• WROW offer, 

• YOU complete 

• COVERAGE and 

• PROMOTION end 

• SERVICE 

5000 Watts • 590 K.C. 

Ask 
THE BOLLINC COMPANY 




BASIC MUTUAL 



27 FEBRUARY 1950 



63 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



199 TV results 

Since its creation sponsor has been 
dedicated to the concept that the best 
way to help the broadcast advertiser 
was to ferret out meaningful facts and 
figures — and best of all conclusive re- 
sults. 

Nearly two years ago the first batch 
of TV results were published in SPON- 
SOR. We kept them brief and we kepi 
them factual. 

\\ hen we printed 99 TV Results, in 
booklet form, earl) in 1949. the first 
edition went faster than we thought 
possible. The next printing was also 
exhausted in record time. Our third 
printing was larger, bul now thai is 
nearl) sold out. 

Were printing a much larger sup- 
pi) of L99 TV Results, to be off the 



press next month. The expanded edi- 
tion will be indexed and categorized. 
How fast copies move should be a fair 
indication of how fast television i> 
moving. 

We think the\"ll go like hotcakes. 



BMB permissions and prohibitions 

II you're thinking ol publicizing 
\our BMB statistics, here are several 
1 asic points to bear in mind : 
i 1 i Station and network subscribers 
must use the latest published reports, 
although previous BMB reports may 
be used tor purposes of comparisons 
and trends. 

i2i You may publicize your own 
BMB data by name, but not compari- 
sons with other named stations or net- 
works. 

(3) Interpretations, mathematical cal- 
culations, conclusions, and inferences 
based on BMB reports must never be 
attributed to the Bureau, must always 
be attributed to the subscriber. 
l4l Maps and tables based on BMB 
data must not be used to imply an aver- 
age or uniform penetration throughout 
a reported area. 

(5) Where maps or tables are limited 
to portions of the full report, both 
maps and tables must be restricted to 
the same areas and the restrictions 
must be noted. Further, complete BMB 
report data must be offered without 
charge on request, even though only 
partial data is published. 



They do it in Hollywood 

What's wrong with LIGHTNING THAT 
TALKS i- more a question of what's 
wrong with industr\ relations than any- 
inherent shortcoming in the film. 

Along with other trade paper repre- 
sentatives, sponsor's editor saw the 
prevue in New York. And like the 
others, we had harsh words of criti- 
cism about various scenes. 

But. keen as our interest is in the 
film, the negative factors didn't disturb 
our sleep. For we knew that what 
would transform lightning that 
talks into a well-paced, well-woven, 
sparkling documentary was nothing 
more than the sort of analysis and cut- 
ting and editing that goes on in Holly- 
wood studios every day. 

No, we're not worried about the 
film. We think it will do all right. 

W hat concerns us more was the fail- 
ure to really impress the press with the 
fact that the prevue was actually a 
showing-in-the-rough. so they could re- 
port it accordingly: the showing for 
the NAB Board in Arizona jolloiving a 
cocktail party; the grave concern (in 
some quarters more than warranted) 
for the feelings of the newspaper com- 
petition. In reversed circumstances, 
would newspaper people raise com- 
parable protests? 

We think LIGHTNING THAT TALKS 
will do all right. We hope that indus- 
try relations techniques will do as 
well. 



Applause 



Radio is getting bigger 

I he out-of-home audience i- radio s 
ace in the hole. 

Radio's uncounted millions are be- 
ginning to be counted. The net effect 
will he honafide evidence to the adver- 
tiser that he's been getting a bonus 
audience of anywhere between 2 per- 
cent and 25 percenl (depending on the 
time of day i with bis purchase of time. 

Imagine the newspaper statisticians 
failing to include the barber -hop 
< opies. the -licet car and bus readers, 
the numerous out-of-home places where 
newspapers are read. Magazines nol 

onl\ count all the reception room 
copies, hut multiply by three, four. 
five, and sometimes ten to get theii 

64 



projected readership. 

Badio has been counting radio 
homes . . . and that's that. The indus- 
try has even failed to take credit for 
the multiple listening that has come 
into being in recent years with the 
"radio in every room" concept. And 
that's a factor worth calculating. 

Radio has been a sales-naive medi- 
um. Its rates are based on what it 
counts . . . and radio is just learning 
to count. 

In New York, Los Vngeles, Chicago. 
Baltimore, Boston. Des Moines and a 
lew additional areas the out-of-home 
tallies are being made. Before long 
more markets will come in for similar 
treatment. Such enterprising organi- 
zation- as Pulse, W M W . Southern 



California Broadcasters. KCBC, WITH, 
and WOR, who are inspiring and bank- 
rolling the big plus analyses, are real 
industry pioneers. Their lead will be 
eagerly followed. 

Advertisers and agencies, contrary 
to the expectations of some, are de- 
lighted with the additional arithmetic. 
They like to know what they're getting. 
In the grand tradition of American 
enterprise, they're willing to pay for it. 

W hen the counting is on a scientific 
basis, the net result will he more busi- 
ness for radio and a healthier respect 
lor the medium. Out-of-home listening 
i- only one phase of the counting. 
Multiple sets in the home is another. 

Radio is getting bigger. 

SPONSOR 



I -.~,w S. » AlC ' , 3 ot* that \ 






,ral ma» ag :, r ; r ve ar *M \N *V 



•^ AX a^ <* aUaB ?a« » . 

F a^ on a ' yt Coffee, ha ? -vvhU'-y 

ed tke" ^ . 00 p-m- 

n ew* P l '.,.,<; the l-\ l ,,, u « Via 



npW s P^we's the ^ 2 \ n r ,; ul has 
This ^ k \* a t Butternut 

carried a OIA tn» n . 

Common he r. staw e; w- 



^ £S£St* 



Paxton and Gallagher, makers of Butter- 
nut Coffee, began an advertising schedule 
on WNAX January 2, 1939. Recently they 
began their twelfth uninterrupted year on 
WNAX, with a 52-week renewal of a Class 
A quarter-hour news strip. 

Like many other blue chip advertisers, 
Butternut has found that WNAX advertis- 
ing is a continuing good investment. These 
advertisers renew their WNAX schedules 
year after year because they get a consist- 
ent return on every advertising dollar in- 
vested with Big Aggie. 

Big Aggie Land, a Major Market, served 
only by WNAX embraces more than a 
million radio families in 308 BMB counties 
of Minnesota, the Dakotas, Nebraska and 
Iowa. 



In 1948, folks in Big Aggie Land with a 
buying income of nearly $5-biIlion — greater 
than Milwaukee, San Francisco or St. Louis 
. . . accounted for $ 1-billion in retail sales — 
greater than Los Angeles, Philadelphia or 
Detroit.* 

Ask your Katz man to show you how 
WNAX can produce good will, increase 
sales of your product or service. 



•Compiled from 1949 Sales Management Survey Of 
Buying Power. 





If WWDC did a selling job with 250 
watts, what do you think it will do for 
you with 5000 watts? This new power 
means new listeners for your message 
on WWDC— 250,000 of them! It means 
more value, more results from every 
advertising dollar you spend on WWDC, 
now more than ever Washington'' s big 
independent. Get the whole story from 
your Forjoe man today. 

WWDC-FM- 20,000 WATTS -THE 
TRANSIT RADIO STATION FOR WASHINGTON 



250,000 NEW i LISTENERS 




-n 

WWDf 

WASHINGTON, Fl~r\ D. C. 




MARCH 1950 • $8.00 a Year 



^sor 






' 1 




_i 







iple sets 
»*- in the he Tie— p. 27 




MR/\L > 



C^OTrrVinutu ^ ., sanity pays off for sponsor — See p. 4 




• - u F 









S'v'i 




X 





vV. Alton 
(ones 

page U 




page 18 
page 24 

I- 



Planned 
spontaneity 

page 



Coffee on 
the air 

page 28 



Disk 
jockeys 





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on 



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in 



Lou 



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p\tt« r ' 

ille 



Gene' ^ 



o„tv <* anne c 2 9teel above 

TrCq hiah 9«n antenna, ^ 

„ ne terrain 
overage i" 

lvv0 studios, 

**° """"".To lichen 
imp studio K " 1 - 

ComP n,era cbam 

Standard SV« * 
Opaqoe H*« 



... «nd »Ot 






facffrties tor 



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loomar tens 




WHASTV 



Coming March 20: Television in the WHAS Tradition 




REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY £ CO. • PRIMARY AFFILIATE CBS TELEVISION NETWORK 

ASSOCIATED WITH THE COURIER-JOURNAL & LOUISVILLE TIMES 




TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



Confusion ends with 

sale of national 

Hooperatings 



Kaiser-Fraser 

launches vigorous 

spot drive 



Interest in spot 
continues at 
record pace 



$100,000 for Army 
recruiting drive 



Family income 
on rise 



13 March 1950 

Confusion era of national ra